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Patients with familial adenomatous polyposis harbor colonic biofilms containing tumorigenic bacteria.
Dejea CM, Fathi P, Craig JM, Boleij A, Taddese R, Geis AL, Wu X, DeStefano Shields CE, Hechenbleikner EM, Huso DL, Anders RA, Giardiello FM, Wick EC, Wang H, Wu S, Pardoll DM, Housseau F, Sears CL
(2018) Science 359: 592-597
MeSH Terms: Adenomatous Polyposis Coli, Animals, Bacterial Toxins, Bacteroides fragilis, Biofilms, Carcinogenesis, Colon, Colonic Neoplasms, DNA Damage, Escherichia coli, Gastrointestinal Microbiome, Humans, Interleukin-17, Intestinal Mucosa, Metalloendopeptidases, Mice, Peptides, Polyketides, Precancerous Conditions
Show Abstract · Added March 20, 2018
Individuals with sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC) frequently harbor abnormalities in the composition of the gut microbiome; however, the microbiota associated with precancerous lesions in hereditary CRC remains largely unknown. We studied colonic mucosa of patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), who develop benign precursor lesions (polyps) early in life. We identified patchy bacterial biofilms composed predominately of and Genes for colibactin () and toxin (), encoding secreted oncotoxins, were highly enriched in FAP patients' colonic mucosa compared to healthy individuals. Tumor-prone mice cocolonized with (expressing colibactin), and enterotoxigenic showed increased interleukin-17 in the colon and DNA damage in colonic epithelium with faster tumor onset and greater mortality, compared to mice with either bacterial strain alone. These data suggest an unexpected link between early neoplasia of the colon and tumorigenic bacteria.
Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.
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19 MeSH Terms
Bacteroides fragilis Toxin Coordinates a Pro-carcinogenic Inflammatory Cascade via Targeting of Colonic Epithelial Cells.
Chung L, Thiele Orberg E, Geis AL, Chan JL, Fu K, DeStefano Shields CE, Dejea CM, Fathi P, Chen J, Finard BB, Tam AJ, McAllister F, Fan H, Wu X, Ganguly S, Lebid A, Metz P, Van Meerbeke SW, Huso DL, Wick EC, Pardoll DM, Wan F, Wu S, Sears CL, Housseau F
(2018) Cell Host Microbe 23: 203-214.e5
MeSH Terms: Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Protein, Animals, Bacterial Toxins, Bacteroides fragilis, Carcinogenesis, Cell Line, Tumor, Colon, Colorectal Neoplasms, Enzyme Activation, Epithelial Cells, Female, Gene Deletion, HT29 Cells, Humans, Inflammation, Interleukin-17, Male, Metalloendopeptidases, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Myeloid Cells, Receptors, Interleukin-17, Receptors, Interleukin-8B, STAT3 Transcription Factor, Transcription Factor RelA
Show Abstract · Added March 20, 2018
Pro-carcinogenic bacteria have the potential to initiate and/or promote colon cancer, in part via immune mechanisms that are incompletely understood. Using Apc mice colonized with the human pathobiont enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF) as a model of microbe-induced colon tumorigenesis, we show that the Bacteroides fragilis toxin (BFT) triggers a pro-carcinogenic, multi-step inflammatory cascade requiring IL-17R, NF-κB, and Stat3 signaling in colonic epithelial cells (CECs). Although necessary, Stat3 activation in CECs is not sufficient to trigger ETBF colon tumorigenesis. Notably, IL-17-dependent NF-κB activation in CECs induces a proximal to distal mucosal gradient of C-X-C chemokines, including CXCL1, that mediates the recruitment of CXCR2-expressing polymorphonuclear immature myeloid cells with parallel onset of ETBF-mediated distal colon tumorigenesis. Thus, BFT induces a pro-carcinogenic signaling relay from the CEC to a mucosal Th17 response that results in selective NF-κB activation in distal colon CECs, which collectively triggers myeloid-cell-dependent distal colon tumorigenesis.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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26 MeSH Terms
IL-17RC is critically required to maintain baseline A20 production to repress JNK isoform-dependent tumor-specific proliferation.
Yan C, Lei Y, Lin TJ, Hoskin DW, Ma A, Wang J
(2017) Oncotarget 8: 43153-43168
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Line, Tumor, Cell Proliferation, Female, Interleukin-17, Isoenzymes, MAP Kinase Kinase 4, Male, Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental, Melanoma, Melanoma, Experimental, Mice, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Receptors, Interleukin-17, Signal Transduction, Transcription Factors, Transfection, Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha-Induced Protein 3
Show Abstract · Added May 15, 2018
The IL-17/IL-17R axis has controversial roles in cancer, which may be explained by tumor-specific results. Here, we describe a novel molecular mechanism underlying IL-17RC-controlled tumor-specific proliferation. Triggered by IL-17RC knockdown (KD), B16 melanoma and 4T1 carcinoma cells inversely altered homeostatic tumor proliferation and tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. In contrast to the existing dogma that IL-17RC-dependent signaling activates the JNK pathway, IL-17RC KD in both tumor cell lines caused aberrant expression and activation of different JNK isoforms along with markedly diminished levels of the ubiquitin-editing enzyme A20. We demonstrated that differential up-regulation of JNK1 and JNK2 in the two tumor cell lines was responsible for the reciprocal regulation of c-Jun activity and tumor-specific proliferation. Furthermore, we showed that A20 reconstitution of IL-17RCKD clones with expression of full-length A20, but not a truncation-mutant, reversed aberrant JNK1/JNK2 activities and tumor-specific proliferation. Collectively, our study reveals a critical role of IL-17RC in maintaining baseline A20 production and a novel role of the IL-17RC-A20 axis in controlling JNK isoform-dependent tumor-specific homeostatic proliferation.
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MeSH Terms
Mucosal Expression of Type 2 and Type 17 Immune Response Genes Distinguishes Ulcerative Colitis From Colon-Only Crohn's Disease in Treatment-Naive Pediatric Patients.
Rosen MJ, Karns R, Vallance JE, Bezold R, Waddell A, Collins MH, Haberman Y, Minar P, Baldassano RN, Hyams JS, Baker SS, Kellermayer R, Noe JD, Griffiths AM, Rosh JR, Crandall WV, Heyman MB, Mack DR, Kappelman MD, Markowitz J, Moulton DE, Leleiko NS, Walters TD, Kugathasan S, Wilson KT, Hogan SP, Denson LA
(2017) Gastroenterology 152: 1345-1357.e7
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Area Under Curve, Case-Control Studies, Child, Colitis, Ulcerative, Colon, Crohn Disease, Female, Gene Expression, Humans, Immunity, Mucosal, Interleukin-13, Interleukin-13 Receptor alpha2 Subunit, Interleukin-17, Interleukin-23, Interleukin-5, Interleukins, Intestinal Mucosa, Male, Predictive Value of Tests, Prognosis, Prospective Studies, RNA, Messenger, ROC Curve, Rectum, Transcriptome, Up-Regulation
Show Abstract · Added January 31, 2017
BACKGROUND & AIMS - There is controversy regarding the role of the type 2 immune response in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis (UC)-few data are available from treatment-naive patients. We investigated whether genes associated with a type 2 immune response in the intestinal mucosa are up-regulated in treatment-naive pediatric patients with UC compared with patients with Crohn's disease (CD)-associated colitis or without inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and whether expression levels are associated with clinical outcomes.
METHODS - We used a real-time reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction array to analyze messenger RNA (mRNA) expression patterns in rectal mucosal samples from 138 treatment-naive pediatric patients with IBD and macroscopic rectal disease, as well as those from 49 children without IBD (controls), enrolled in a multicenter prospective observational study from 2008 to 2012. Results were validated in real-time reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses of rectal RNA from an independent cohort of 34 pediatric patients with IBD and macroscopic rectal disease and 17 controls from Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center.
RESULTS - We measured significant increases in mRNAs associated with a type 2 immune response (interleukin [IL]5 gene, IL13, and IL13RA2) and a type 17 immune response (IL17A and IL23) in mucosal samples from patients with UC compared with patients with colon-only CD. In a regression model, increased expression of IL5 and IL17A mRNAs distinguished patients with UC from patients with colon-only CD (P = .001; area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, 0.72). We identified a gene expression pattern in rectal tissues of patients with UC, characterized by detection of IL13 mRNA, that predicted clinical response to therapy after 6 months (odds ratio [OR], 6.469; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.553-26.94), clinical response after 12 months (OR, 6.125; 95% CI, 1.330-28.22), and remission after 12 months (OR, 5.333; 95% CI, 1.132-25.12).
CONCLUSIONS - In an analysis of rectal tissues from treatment-naive pediatric patients with IBD, we observed activation of a type 2 immune response during the early course of UC. We were able to distinguish patients with UC from those with colon-only CD based on increased mucosal expression of genes that mediate type 2 and type 17 immune responses. Increased expression at diagnosis of genes that mediate a type 2 immune response is associated with response to therapy and remission in pediatric patients with UC.
Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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27 MeSH Terms
TLR9 activation suppresses inflammation in response to Helicobacter pylori infection.
Varga MG, Piazuelo MB, Romero-Gallo J, Delgado AG, Suarez G, Whitaker ME, Krishna US, Patel RV, Skaar EP, Wilson KT, Algood HM, Peek RM
(2016) Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol 311: G852-G858
MeSH Terms: Animals, Gastric Mucosa, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Inflammation, Interleukin-17, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Toll-Like Receptor 9
Show Abstract · Added October 22, 2016
Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) induces chronic gastritis in humans, and infection can persist for decades. One H. pylori strain-specific constituent that augments disease risk is the cag pathogenicity island. The cag island encodes a type IV secretion system (T4SS) that translocates DNA into host cells. Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) is an innate immune receptor that detects hypo-methylated CpG DNA motifs. In this study, we sought to define the role of the H. pylori cag T4SS on TLR9-mediated responses in vivo. H. pylori strain PMSS1 or its cagE mutant, which fails to assemble a T4SS, were used to infect wild-type or Tlr9 C57BL/6 mice. PMSS1-infected Tlr9 mice developed significantly higher levels of inflammation, despite similar levels of colonization density, compared with PMSS1-infected wild-type mice. These changes were cag dependent, as both mouse genotypes infected with the cagE mutant only developed minimal inflammation. Tlr9 genotypes did not alter the microbial phenotypes of in vivo-adapted H. pylori strains; therefore, we examined host immunological responses. There were no differences in levels of T1 or T2 cytokines in infected mice when stratified by host genotype. However, gastric mucosal levels of IL-17 were significantly increased in infected Tlr9 mice compared with infected wild-type mice, and H. pylori infection of IL-17A mice concordantly led to significantly decreased levels of gastritis. Thus loss of Tlr9 selectively augments the intensity of IL-17-driven immune responses to H. pylori in a cag T4SS-dependent manner. These results suggest that H. pylori utilizes the cag T4SS to manipulate the intensity of the host immune response.
Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.
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9 MeSH Terms
The myeloid immune signature of enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis-induced murine colon tumorigenesis.
Thiele Orberg E, Fan H, Tam AJ, Dejea CM, Destefano Shields CE, Wu S, Chung L, Finard BB, Wu X, Fathi P, Ganguly S, Fu J, Pardoll DM, Sears CL, Housseau F
(2017) Mucosal Immunol 10: 421-433
MeSH Terms: Animals, Arginase, Bacterial Toxins, Bacteroides Infections, Bacteroides fragilis, Carcinogenesis, Cell Differentiation, Cell Proliferation, Cells, Cultured, Colon, Colorectal Neoplasms, Disease Models, Animal, Epithelial Cells, Genes, APC, Humans, Immune Tolerance, Interleukin-17, Metalloendopeptidases, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Mutant Strains, Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells, Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II, T-Lymphocytes, Transcriptome
Show Abstract · Added March 20, 2018
Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF), a human commensal and candidate pathogen in colorectal cancer (CRC), is a potent initiator of interleukin-17 (IL-17)-dependent colon tumorigenesis in Min mice. We examined the role of IL-17 and ETBF on the differentiation of myeloid cells into myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and tumor-associated macrophages, which are known to promote tumorigenesis. The myeloid compartment associated with ETBF-induced colon tumorigenesis in Min mice was defined using flow cytometry and gene expression profiling. Cell-sorted immature myeloid cells were functionally assayed for inhibition of T-cell proliferation and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression to delineate MDSC populations. A comparison of ETBF infection with that of other oncogenic bacteria (Fusobacterium nucleatum or pksEscherichia coli) revealed a specific, ETBF-associated colonic immune infiltrate. ETBF-triggered colon tumorigenesis is associated with an IL-17-driven myeloid signature characterized by subversion of steady-state myelopoiesis in favor of the generation of protumoral monocytic-MDSCs (MO-MDSCs). Combined action of the B. fragilis enterotoxin BFT and IL-17 on colonic epithelial cells promoted the differentiation of MO-MDSCs, which selectively upregulated Arg1 and Nos2, produced NO, and suppressed T-cell proliferation. Evidence of a pathogenic inflammatory signature in humans colonized with ETBF may allow for the identification of populations at risk for developing colon cancer.
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25 MeSH Terms
Idiopathic subglottic stenosis is associated with activation of the inflammatory IL-17A/IL-23 axis.
Gelbard A, Katsantonis NG, Mizuta M, Newcomb D, Rotsinger J, Rousseau B, Daniero JJ, Edell ES, Ekbom DC, Kasperbauer JL, Hillel AT, Yang L, Garrett CG, Netterville JL, Wootten CT, Francis DO, Stratton C, Jenkins K, McGregor TL, Gaddy JA, Blackwell TS, Drake WP
(2016) Laryngoscope 126: E356-E361
MeSH Terms: Airway Obstruction, Case-Control Studies, Humans, Inflammation Mediators, Interleukin-17, Interleukin-23, Larynx, Signal Transduction, Trachea, Tracheal Stenosis
Show Abstract · Added January 25, 2017
OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS - Idiopathic subglottic stenosis (iSGS) is a rare and devastating extrathoracic obstruction involving the lower laryngeal and upper tracheal airway. It arises without known antecedent injury or associated disease process. Persistent mucosal inflammation and a localized fibrotic response are hallmarks of the disease. Despite the initial clinical description of iSGS more than 40 year ago, there have been no substantive investigations into the pathogenesis of this enigmatic and progressive airway obstruction. In these studies, we present the initial characterization of the molecular pathogenesis underlying the fibrosing phenotype of iSGS.
METHODS - Utilizing 20 human iSGS and healthy control specimens, we applied histologic, immunohistochemical, molecular, and immunologic techniques.
RESULTS - We demonstrate significant activation of the canonical IL-23/IL-17A pathway in the tracheal mucosa of iSGS patients, as well as identify γδ T cells as the primary cellular source of IL-17A.
CONCLUSION - Our results suggest that aberrant mucosal immune activation is a component in of the pathogenesis of iSGS. Most critically, our work offers new targets for future therapeutic intervention.
LEVEL OF EVIDENCE - NA Laryngoscope, 126:E356-E361, 2016.
© 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.
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10 MeSH Terms
Interleukin-17A Regulates Renal Sodium Transporters and Renal Injury in Angiotensin II-Induced Hypertension.
Norlander AE, Saleh MA, Kamat NV, Ko B, Gnecco J, Zhu L, Dale BL, Iwakura Y, Hoover RS, McDonough AA, Madhur MS
(2016) Hypertension 68: 167-74
MeSH Terms: Acute Kidney Injury, Analysis of Variance, Angiotensin II, Animals, Blood Pressure Determination, Cells, Cultured, Disease Models, Animal, Hypertension, Immunoblotting, Interleukin-17, Kidney Tubules, Proximal, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Random Allocation, Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction, Sensitivity and Specificity, Sodium Chloride Symporters, Solute Carrier Family 12, Member 3
Show Abstract · Added September 7, 2017
Angiotensin II-induced hypertension is associated with an increase in T-cell production of interleukin-17A (IL-17A). Recently, we reported that IL-17A(-/-) mice exhibit blunted hypertension, preserved natriuresis in response to a saline challenge, and decreased renal sodium hydrogen exchanger 3 expression after 2 weeks of angiotensin II infusion compared with wild-type mice. In the current study, we performed renal transporter profiling in mice deficient in IL-17A or the related isoform, IL-17F, after 4 weeks of Ang II infusion, the time when the blood pressure reduction in IL-17A(-/-) mice is most prominent. Deficiency of IL-17A abolished the activation of distal tubule transporters, specifically the sodium-chloride cotransporter and the epithelial sodium channel and protected mice from glomerular and tubular injury. In human proximal tubule (HK-2) cells, IL-17A increased sodium hydrogen exchanger 3 expression through a serum and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1-dependent pathway. In mouse distal convoluted tubule cells, IL-17A increased sodium-chloride cotransporter activity in a serum and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1/Nedd4-2-dependent pathway. In both cell types, acute treatment with IL-17A induced phosphorylation of serum and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1 at serine 78, and treatment with a serum and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1 inhibitor blocked the effects of IL-17A on sodium hydrogen exchanger 3 and sodium-chloride cotransporter. Interestingly, both HK-2 and mouse distal convoluted tubule 15 cells produce endogenous IL-17A. IL17F had little or no effect on blood pressure or renal sodium transporter abundance. These studies provide a mechanistic link by which IL-17A modulates renal sodium transport and suggest that IL-17A inhibition may improve renal function in hypertension and other autoimmune disorders.
© 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.
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19 MeSH Terms
Targeting IL-17A attenuates neonatal sepsis mortality induced by IL-18.
Wynn JL, Wilson CS, Hawiger J, Scumpia PO, Marshall AF, Liu JH, Zharkikh I, Wong HR, Lahni P, Benjamin JT, Plosa EJ, Weitkamp JH, Sherwood ER, Moldawer LL, Ungaro R, Baker HV, Lopez MC, McElroy SJ, Colliou N, Mohamadzadeh M, Moore DJ
(2016) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 113: E2627-35
MeSH Terms: Animals, Animals, Newborn, Antibodies, Monoclonal, Female, Interleukin-17, Interleukin-18, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Molecular Targeted Therapy, Neonatal Sepsis, Survival Rate, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added April 27, 2016
Interleukin (IL)-18 is an important effector of innate and adaptive immunity, but its expression must also be tightly regulated because it can potentiate lethal systemic inflammation and death. Healthy and septic human neonates demonstrate elevated serum concentrations of IL-18 compared with adults. Thus, we determined the contribution of IL-18 to lethality and its mechanism in a murine model of neonatal sepsis. We find that IL-18-null neonatal mice are highly protected from polymicrobial sepsis, whereas replenishing IL-18 increased lethality to sepsis or endotoxemia. Increased lethality depended on IL-1 receptor 1 (IL-1R1) signaling but not adaptive immunity. In genome-wide analyses of blood mRNA from septic human neonates, expression of the IL-17 receptor emerged as a critical regulatory node. Indeed, IL-18 administration in sepsis increased IL-17A production by murine intestinal γδT cells as well as Ly6G(+) myeloid cells, and blocking IL-17A reduced IL-18-potentiated mortality to both neonatal sepsis and endotoxemia. We conclude that IL-17A is a previously unrecognized effector of IL-18-mediated injury in neonatal sepsis and that disruption of the deleterious and tissue-destructive IL-18/IL-1/IL-17A axis represents a novel therapeutic approach to improve outcomes for human neonates with sepsis.
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13 MeSH Terms
IL-17a and IL-22 Induce Expression of Antimicrobials in Gastrointestinal Epithelial Cells and May Contribute to Epithelial Cell Defense against Helicobacter pylori.
Dixon BR, Radin JN, Piazuelo MB, Contreras DC, Algood HM
(2016) PLoS One 11: e0148514
MeSH Terms: Animals, Anti-Infective Agents, CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes, Epithelial Cells, Epithelium, Gastritis, Gastrointestinal Tract, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Humans, Inflammation, Interleukin-17, Interleukin-8, Interleukins, Leukocyte L1 Antigen Complex, Lipocalins, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Transgenic, Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction, Stomach
Show Abstract · Added April 28, 2016
Helicobacter pylori colonization of the human stomach can lead to adverse clinical outcomes including gastritis, peptic ulcers, or gastric cancer. Current data suggest that in addition to bacterial virulence factors, the magnitude and types of immune responses influence the outcome of colonization. Specifically, CD4+ T cell responses impact the pathology elicited in response to H. pylori. Because gastritis is believed to be the initiating host response to more detrimental pathological outcomes, there has been a significant interest in pro-inflammatory T cell cytokines, including the cytokines produced by T helper 17 cells. Th17 cells produce IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-21 and IL-22. While these cytokines have been linked to inflammation, IL-17A and IL-22 are also associated with anti-microbial responses and control of bacterial colonization. The goal of this research was to determine the role of IL-22 in activation of antimicrobial responses in models of H. pylori infection using human gastric epithelial cell lines and the mouse model of H. pylori infection. Our data indicate that IL-17A and IL-22 work synergistically to induce antimicrobials and chemokines such as IL-8, components of calprotectin (CP), lipocalin (LCN) and some β-defensins in both human and primary mouse gastric epithelial cells (GEC) and gastroids. Moreover, IL-22 and IL-17A-activated GECs were capable of inhibiting growth of H. pylori in vitro. While antimicrobials were activated by IL-17A and IL-22 in vitro, using a mouse model of H. pylori infection, the data herein indicate that IL-22 deficiency alone does not render mice more susceptible to infection, change their antimicrobial gene transcription, or significantly change their inflammatory response.
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22 MeSH Terms