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Antimicrobial exposure and the risk of delirium in critically ill patients.
Grahl JJ, Stollings JL, Rakhit S, Person AK, Wang L, Thompson JL, Pandharipande PP, Ely EW, Patel MB
(2018) Crit Care 22: 337
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Anti-Infective Agents, Cohort Studies, Critical Illness, Cross-Sectional Studies, Delirium, Female, Humans, Intensive Care Units, Length of Stay, Male, Middle Aged, Multivariate Analysis, Retrospective Studies
Show Abstract · Added December 16, 2018
BACKGROUND - Prior retrospective cross-sectional work has associated antimicrobials with a non-specific phrase: encephalopathy without seizures. The purpose of this study is to determine whether different classes of antimicrobials have differential associations with the daily risk of delirium after critical illness is adjusted for.
METHODS - Our study was a nested cohort that enrolled non-neurological critically ill adults from a medical or surgical intensive care unit (ICU) with daily follow-up to 30 days. Our independent variable was exposure to previous-day antimicrobial class: beta-lactams (subclasses: penicillins, first- to third-generation cephalosporins, fourth-generation cephalosporins, and carbapenems), macrolides, fluoroquinolones, and other. We adjusted for baseline covariates (age, comorbidities, cognition scores, sepsis, and mechanical ventilation), previous-day covariates (delirium, doses of analgesics/sedatives, and antipsychotic use), and same-day covariates (illness severity). Our primary outcome of delirium was measured by using the Confusion Assessment Method for the ICU. A daily delirium logistic regression model was used with an ICU time-restricted sensitivity analysis including daily adjustment for sepsis and mechanical ventilation.
RESULTS - Of 418 ICU patients, delirium occurred in 308 (74%) with a median of 3 days (interquartile range 2-6) among those affected and 318 (76%) were exposed to antimicrobials. When covariates and ICU type were adjusted for, only first- to third-generation cephalosporins were associated with delirium (logistic regression model odds ratio (OR) = 2.2, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.28-3.79, P = 0.004; sensitivity analysis OR = 2.13, 95% CI 1.10-4.10, P = 0.024).
CONCLUSIONS - First-, second-, and third-generation cephalosporins doubled the odds of delirium after baseline co-morbidities, ICU type, the course of critical care, and other competing antimicrobial and psychotropic medication risks were adjusted for. We did not find an association between delirium and cefepime, penicillins, carbapenems, fluoroquinolones, or macrolides.
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15 MeSH Terms
The Cost of ICU Delirium and Coma in the Intensive Care Unit Patient.
Vasilevskis EE, Chandrasekhar R, Holtze CH, Graves J, Speroff T, Girard TD, Patel MB, Hughes CG, Cao A, Pandharipande PP, Ely EW
(2018) Med Care 56: 890-897
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Coma, Comorbidity, Costs and Cost Analysis, Critical Illness, Delirium, Dialysis, Female, Humans, Intensive Care Units, Male, Middle Aged, Prospective Studies, Respiration, Artificial, Risk Factors
Show Abstract · Added September 5, 2018
RATIONALE - Intensive care unit (ICU) delirium is highly prevalent and a potentially avoidable hospital complication. The current cost of ICU delirium is unknown.
OBJECTIVES - To specify the association between the daily occurrence of delirium in the ICU with costs of ICU care accounting for time-varying illness severity and death.
RESEARCH DESIGN - We performed a prospective cohort study within medical and surgical ICUs in a large academic medical center.
SUBJECTS - We analyzed critically ill patients (N=479) with respiratory failure and/or shock.
MEASURES - Covariates included baseline factors (age, insurance, cognitive impairment, comorbidities, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II Score) and time-varying factors (sequential organ failure assessment score, mechanical ventilation, and severe sepsis). The primary analysis used a novel 3-stage regression method: first, estimation of the cumulative cost of delirium over 30 ICU days and then costs separated into those attributable to increased resource utilization among survivors and those that were avoided on the account of delirium's association with early mortality in the ICU.
RESULTS - The patient-level 30-day cumulative cost of ICU delirium attributable to increased resource utilization was $17,838 (95% confidence interval, $11,132-$23,497). A combination of professional, dialysis, and bed costs accounted for the largest percentage of the incremental costs associated with ICU delirium. The 30-day cumulative incremental costs of ICU delirium that were avoided due to delirium-associated early mortality was $4654 (95% confidence interval, $2056-7869).
CONCLUSIONS - Delirium is associated with substantial costs after accounting for time-varying illness severity and could be 20% higher (∼$22,500) if not for its association with early ICU mortality.
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16 MeSH Terms
Clinical phenotypes of delirium during critical illness and severity of subsequent long-term cognitive impairment: a prospective cohort study.
Girard TD, Thompson JL, Pandharipande PP, Brummel NE, Jackson JC, Patel MB, Hughes CG, Chandrasekhar R, Pun BT, Boehm LM, Elstad MR, Goodman RB, Bernard GR, Dittus RS, Ely EW
(2018) Lancet Respir Med 6: 213-222
MeSH Terms: Aged, Cognitive Dysfunction, Critical Illness, Delirium, Female, Humans, Incidence, Intensive Care Units, Linear Models, Male, Middle Aged, Phenotype, Prospective Studies, Respiratory Insufficiency, Risk Factors, Shock, Survivors, Time Factors
Show Abstract · Added June 26, 2018
BACKGROUND - Delirium during critical illness results from numerous insults, which might be interconnected and yet individually contribute to long-term cognitive impairment. We sought to describe the prevalence and duration of clinical phenotypes of delirium (ie, phenotypes defined by clinical risk factors) and to understand associations between these clinical phenotypes and severity of subsequent long-term cognitive impairment.
METHODS - In this multicentre, prospective cohort study, we included adult (≥18 years) medical or surgical ICU patients with respiratory failure, shock, or both as part of two parallel studies: the Bringing to Light the Risk Factors and Incidence of Neuropsychological Dysfunction in ICU Survivors (BRAIN-ICU) study, and the Delirium and Dementia in Veterans Surviving ICU Care (MIND-ICU) study. We assessed patients at least once a day for delirium using the Confusion Assessment Method-ICU and identified a priori-defined, non-mutually exclusive phenotypes of delirium per the presence of hypoxia, sepsis, sedative exposure, or metabolic (eg, renal or hepatic) dysfunction. We considered delirium in the absence of hypoxia, sepsis, sedation, and metabolic dysfunction to be unclassified. 3 and 12 months after discharge, we assessed cognition with the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS). We used multiple linear regression to separately analyse associations between the duration of each phenotype of delirium and RBANS global cognition scores at 3-month and 12-month follow-up, adjusting for potential confounders.
FINDINGS - Between March 14, 2007, and May 27, 2010, 1048 participants were enrolled, eight of whom could not be analysed. Of 1040 participants, 708 survived to 3 months of follow-up and 628 to 12 months. Delirium was common, affecting 740 (71%) of 1040 participants at some point during the study and occurring on 4187 (31%) of all 13 434 participant-days. A single delirium phenotype was present on only 1355 (32%) of all 4187 participant-delirium days, whereas two or more phenotypes were present during 2832 (68%) delirium days. Sedative-associated delirium was most common (present during 2634 [63%] delirium days), and a longer duration of sedative-associated delirium predicted a worse RBANS global cognition score 12 months later, after adjusting for covariates (difference in score comparing 3 days vs 0 days: -4·03, 95% CI -7·80 to -0·26). Similarly, longer durations of hypoxic delirium (-3·76, 95% CI -7·16 to -0·37), septic delirium (-3·67, -7·13 to -0·22), and unclassified delirium (-4·70, -7·16 to -2·25) also predicted worse cognitive function at 12 months, whereas duration of metabolic delirium did not (1·14, -0·12 to 3·01).
INTERPRETATION - Our findings suggest that clinicians should consider sedative-associated, hypoxic, and septic delirium, which often co-occur, as distinct indicators of acute brain injury and seek to identify all potential risk factors that may impact on long-term cognitive impairment, especially those that are iatrogenic and potentially modifiable such as sedation.
FUNDING - National Institutes of Health and the Department of Veterans Affairs.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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18 MeSH Terms
Acute Kidney Injury and Subsequent Frailty Status in Survivors of Critical Illness: A Secondary Analysis.
Abdel-Kader K, Girard TD, Brummel NE, Saunders CT, Blume JD, Clark AJ, Vincz AJ, Ely EW, Jackson JC, Bell SP, Archer KR, Ikizler TA, Pandharipande PP, Siew ED
(2018) Crit Care Med 46: e380-e388
MeSH Terms: APACHE, Acute Kidney Injury, Adult, Aged, Critical Illness, Female, Frailty, Humans, Intensive Care Units, Male, Middle Aged, Prospective Studies, Risk Factors, Severity of Illness Index, Survivors
Show Abstract · Added November 29, 2018
OBJECTIVES - Acute kidney injury frequently complicates critical illness and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Frailty is common in critical illness survivors, but little is known about the impact of acute kidney injury. We examined the association of acute kidney injury and frailty within a year of hospital discharge in survivors of critical illness.
DESIGN - Secondary analysis of a prospective cohort study.
SETTING - Medical/surgical ICU of a U.S. tertiary care medical center.
PATIENTS - Three hundred seventeen participants with respiratory failure and/or shock.
INTERVENTIONS - None.
MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS - Acute kidney injury was determined using Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes stages. Clinical frailty status was determined using the Clinical Frailty Scale at 3 and 12 months following discharge. Covariates included mean ICU Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score as well as baseline comorbidity (i.e., Charlson Comorbidity Index), kidney function, and Clinical Frailty Scale score. Of 317 patients, 243 (77%) had acute kidney injury and one in four patients with acute kidney injury was frail at baseline. In adjusted models, acute kidney injury stages 1, 2, and 3 were associated with higher frailty scores at 3 months (odds ratio, 1.92; 95% CI, 1.14-3.24; odds ratio, 2.40; 95% CI, 1.31-4.42; and odds ratio, 4.41; 95% CI, 2.20-8.82, respectively). At 12 months, a similar association of acute kidney injury stages 1, 2, and 3 and higher Clinical Frailty Scale score was noted (odds ratio, 1.87; 95% CI, 1.11-3.14; odds ratio, 1.81; 95% CI, 0.94-3.48; and odds ratio, 2.76; 95% CI, 1.34-5.66, respectively). In supplemental and sensitivity analyses, analogous patterns of association were observed.
CONCLUSIONS - Acute kidney injury in survivors of critical illness predicted worse frailty status 3 and 12 months postdischarge. These findings have important implications on clinical decision making among acute kidney injury survivors and underscore the need to understand the drivers of frailty to improve patient-centered outcomes.
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15 MeSH Terms
Incorporating Markers of Disease Severity into Near Real-Time Influenza Surveillance.
Grijalva CG, O'Donnell M, Talbot HK
(2017) Ann Am Thorac Soc 14: 1766-1767
MeSH Terms: Humans, Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype, Influenza, Human, Intensive Care Units, Morbidity
Added July 27, 2018
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Subsyndromal Delirium and Institutionalization Among Patients With Critical Illness.
Brummel NE, Boehm LM, Girard TD, Pandharipande PP, Jackson JC, Hughes CG, Patel MB, Han JH, Vasilevskis EE, Thompson JL, Chandrasekhar R, Bernard GR, Dittus RS, Ely EW
(2017) Am J Crit Care 26: 447-455
MeSH Terms: Aged, Critical Illness, Delirium, Female, Humans, Institutionalization, Intensive Care Units, Length of Stay, Male, Middle Aged, Prospective Studies, Risk Factors
Show Abstract · Added June 26, 2018
BACKGROUND - The prognostic importance of subsyndromal delirium is unknown.
OBJECTIVE - To test whether duration of subsyndromal delirium is independently associated with institutionalization.
METHODS - The Confusion Assessment Method for the Intensive Care Unit (CAM-ICU) was used twice daily to assess for subsyndromal delirium in patients with respiratory failure or shock. Delirium was considered present if the assessment was positive. Subsyndromal delirium was considered present if the assessment was negative but the patient exhibited any CAM-ICU features. Multivariable regression was used to determine the association between duration of subsyndromal delirium and institutionalization, adjusting for age, education, baseline cognition and disability, comorbidities, severity of illness, delirium, coma, sepsis, and doses of sedatives and opiates.
RESULTS - Subsyndromal delirium, lasting a median of 3 days, developed in 702 of 821 patients (86%). After adjusting for covariates, duration of subsyndromal delirium was an independent predictor of increased odds of institutionalization ( = .007). This association was greatest in patients with less delirium ( for interaction = .01). Specifically, of patients who were never delirious, those with 5 days of subsyndromal delirium (upper interquartile range [IQR]) were 4.2 times more likely to be institutionalized than those with 1.5 days of subsyndromal delirium (lower IQR).
CONCLUSIONS - Subsyndromal delirium occurred in most critically ill patients, and its duration was an independent predictor of institutionalization. Routine monitoring of all delirium symptoms may enable detection of full and subsyndromal forms of delirium.
©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.
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Effectiveness of β-Lactam Monotherapy vs Macrolide Combination Therapy for Children Hospitalized With Pneumonia.
Williams DJ, Edwards KM, Self WH, Zhu Y, Arnold SR, McCullers JA, Ampofo K, Pavia AT, Anderson EJ, Hicks LA, Bramley AM, Jain S, Grijalva CG
(2017) JAMA Pediatr 171: 1184-1191
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Anti-Bacterial Agents, Child, Child, Preschool, Community-Acquired Infections, Drug Therapy, Combination, Hospitalization, Humans, Infant, Intensive Care Units, Pediatric, Length of Stay, Macrolides, Patient Readmission, Pneumonia, Bacterial, Propensity Score, Radiography, Treatment Outcome, beta-Lactams
Show Abstract · Added July 27, 2018
Importance - β-Lactam monotherapy and β-lactam plus macrolide combination therapy are both common empirical treatment strategies for children hospitalized with pneumonia, but few studies have evaluated the effectiveness of these 2 treatment approaches.
Objective - To compare the effectiveness of β-lactam monotherapy vs β-lactam plus macrolide combination therapy among a cohort of children hospitalized with pneumonia.
Design, Setting, and Participants - We analyzed data from the Etiology of Pneumonia in the Community Study, a multicenter, prospective, population-based study of community-acquired pneumonia hospitalizations conducted from January 1, 2010, to June 30, 2012, in 3 children's hospitals in Nashville, Tennessee; Memphis, Tennessee; and Salt Lake City, Utah. The study included all children (up to 18 years of age) who were hospitalized with radiographically confirmed pneumonia and who received β-lactam monotherapy or β-lactam plus macrolide combination therapy. Data analysis was completed in April 2017.
Main Outcomes and Measures - We defined the referent as β-lactam monotherapy, including exclusive use of an oral or parenteral second- or third-generation cephalosporin, penicillin, ampicillin, ampicillin-sulbactam, amoxicillin, or amoxicillin-clavulanate. Use of a β-lactam plus an oral or parenteral macrolide (azithromycin or clarithromycin) served as the comparison group. We modeled the association between these groups and patients' length of stay using multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression. Covariates included demographic, clinical, and radiographic variables. We further evaluated length of stay in a cohort matched by propensity to receive combination therapy. Logistic regression was used to evaluate secondary outcomes in the unmatched cohort, including intensive care admission, rehospitalizations, and self-reported recovery at follow-up.
Results - Our study included 1418 children (693 girls and 725 boys) with a median age of 27 months (interquartile range, 12-69 months). This cohort was 60.1% of the 2358 children enrolled in the Etiology of Pneumonia in the Community Study with radiographically confirmed pneumonia in the study period; 1019 (71.9%) received β-lactam monotherapy and 399 (28.1%) received β-lactam plus macrolide combination therapy. In the unmatched cohort, there was no statistically significant difference in length of hospital stay between children receiving β-lactam monotherapy and combination therapy (median, 55 vs 59 hours; adjusted hazard ratio, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.74-1.01). The propensity-matched cohort (n = 560, 39.5%) showed similar results. There were also no significant differences between treatment groups for the secondary outcomes.
Conclusions and Relevance - Empirical macrolide combination therapy conferred no benefit over β-lactam monotherapy for children hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia. The results of this study elicit questions about the routine empirical use of macrolide combination therapy in this population.
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Circulating levels of soluble Fas (sCD95) are associated with risk for development of a nonresolving acute kidney injury subphenotype.
Bhatraju PK, Robinson-Cohen C, Mikacenic C, Harju-Baker S, Dmyterko V, Slivinski NSJ, Liles WC, Himmelfarb J, Heckbert SR, Wurfel MM
(2017) Crit Care 21: 217
MeSH Terms: Acute Kidney Injury, Adult, Aged, Biomarkers, Critical Illness, Female, Hospital Mortality, Humans, Intensive Care Units, Male, Middle Aged, Phenotype, Risk, fas Receptor
Show Abstract · Added September 19, 2017
BACKGROUND - Critically ill patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) can be divided into two subphenotypes, resolving or nonresolving, on the basis of the trajectory of serum creatinine. It is unknown if the biology underlying these two AKI recovery patterns is different.
METHODS - We measured eight circulating biomarkers in plasma obtained from a cohort of patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) (n = 1241) with systemic inflammatory response syndrome. The biomarkers were representative of several biologic processes: apoptosis (soluble Fas), inflammation (soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 1, interleukin 6, interleukin 8) and endothelial dysfunction, (angiopoietin 1, angiopoietin 2, and soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule 1). We tested for associations between biomarker levels and AKI subphenotypes using relative risk regression accounting for multiple hypotheses with the Bonferroni correction.
RESULTS - During the first 3 days of ICU admission, 868 (70%) subjects developed AKI; 502 (40%) had a resolving subphenotype, and 366 (29%) had a nonresolving subphenotype. Hospital mortality was 12% in the resolving subphenotype and 21% in the nonresolving subphenotype. Soluble Fas was the only biomarker associated with a nonresolving subphenotype after adjustment for age, body mass index, diabetes, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation III score (p = 0.005).
CONCLUSIONS - Identifying modifiable targets in the Fas-mediated pathway may lead to strategies for prevention and treatment of a clinically important form of AKI.
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Relationship Between Body Mass Index and Outcomes Among Hospitalized Patients With Community-Acquired Pneumonia.
Bramley AM, Reed C, Finelli L, Self WH, Ampofo K, Arnold SR, Williams DJ, Grijalva CG, Anderson EJ, Stockmann C, Trabue C, Fakhran S, Balk R, McCullers JA, Pavia AT, Edwards KM, Wunderink RG, Jain S, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Etiology of Pneumonia in the Community (EPIC) Study Team
(2017) J Infect Dis 215: 1873-1882
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Asthma, Body Mass Index, Child, Child, Preschool, Community-Acquired Infections, Comorbidity, Female, Hospitalization, Humans, Intensive Care Units, Length of Stay, Male, Middle Aged, Obesity, Odds Ratio, Pneumonia, Prospective Studies, Respiration, Artificial, Treatment Outcome, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added July 27, 2018
Background - The effect of body mass index (BMI) on community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) severity is unclear.
Methods - We investigated the relationship between BMI and CAP outcomes (hospital length of stay [LOS], intensive care unit [ICU] admission, and invasive mechanical ventilation) in hospitalized CAP patients from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Etiology of Pneumonia in the Community (EPIC) study, adjusting for age, demographics, underlying conditions, and smoking status (adults only).
Results - Compared with normal-weight children, odds of ICU admission were higher in children who were overweight (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-2.8) or obese (aOR, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.4-3.2), and odds of mechanical ventilation were higher in children with obesity (aOR, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.3-5.6). When stratified by asthma (presence/absence), these findings remained significant only in children with asthma. Compared with normal-weight adults, odds of LOS >3 days were higher in adults who were underweight (aOR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.1-2.4), and odds of mechanical ventilation were lowest in adults who were overweight (aOR, 0.5; 95% CI, .3-.9).
Conclusions - Children who were overweight or obese, particularly those with asthma, had higher odds of ICU admission or mechanical ventilation. In contrast, adults who were underweight had longer LOS. These results underscore the complex relationship between BMI and CAP outcomes.
Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.
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The ABCDEF Bundle in Critical Care.
Marra A, Ely EW, Pandharipande PP, Patel MB
(2017) Crit Care Clin 33: 225-243
MeSH Terms: Critical Care, Critical Illness, Humans, Intensive Care Units, Patient Care Bundles, Patient Care Team
Show Abstract · Added June 26, 2018
The ABCDEF bundle represents an evidence-based guide for clinicians to approach the organizational changes needed for optimizing intensive care unit patient recovery and outcomes. This article reviews the core evidence and features behind the ABCDEF bundle. The bundle has individual components that are clearly defined, flexible to implement, and help empower multidisciplinary clinicians and families in the shared care of the critically ill. The ABCDEF bundle helps guide well-rounded patient care and optimal resource utilization resulting in more interactive intensive care unit patients with better controlled pain, who can safely participate in higher-order physical and cognitive activities at the earliest point in their critical illness.
Published by Elsevier Inc.
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