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Regulation of Glucose-Dependent Golgi-Derived Microtubules by cAMP/EPAC2 Promotes Secretory Vesicle Biogenesis in Pancreatic β Cells.
Trogden KP, Zhu X, Lee JS, Wright CVE, Gu G, Kaverina I
(2019) Curr Biol 29: 2339-2350.e5
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cyclic AMP, Glucose, Golgi Apparatus, Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors, Insulin-Secreting Cells, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred ICR, Microtubules, Organelle Biogenesis, Secretory Vesicles
Show Abstract · Added August 6, 2019
The microtubule (MT) network is an essential regulator of insulin secretion from pancreatic β cells, which is central to blood-sugar homeostasis. We find that when glucose metabolism induces insulin secretion, it also increases formation of Golgi-derived microtubules (GDMTs), notably with the same biphasic kinetics as insulin exocytosis. Furthermore, GDMT nucleation is controlled by a glucose signal-transduction pathway through cAMP and its effector EPAC2. Preventing new GDMT nucleation dramatically affects the pipeline of insulin production, storage, and release. There is an overall reduction of β-cell insulin content, and remaining insulin becomes retained within the Golgi, likely because of stalling of insulin-granule budding. While not preventing glucose-induced insulin exocytosis, the diminished granule availability substantially blunts the amount secreted. Constant dynamic maintenance of the GDMT network is therefore critical for normal β-cell physiology. Our study demonstrates that the biogenesis of post-Golgi carriers, particularly large secretory granules, requires ongoing nucleation and replenishment of the GDMT network.
Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
1 Communities
0 Members
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12 MeSH Terms
The Pdx1-Bound Swi/Snf Chromatin Remodeling Complex Regulates Pancreatic Progenitor Cell Proliferation and Mature Islet β-Cell Function.
Spaeth JM, Liu JH, Peters D, Guo M, Osipovich AB, Mohammadi F, Roy N, Bhushan A, Magnuson MA, Hebrok M, Wright CVE, Stein R
(2019) Diabetes 68: 1806-1818
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Proliferation, Chromatin Assembly and Disassembly, DNA Helicases, Gene Expression Regulation, Glucose Intolerance, Homeodomain Proteins, Insulin, Insulin-Secreting Cells, Mice, Mice, Transgenic, Nuclear Proteins, Pancreas, Trans-Activators, Transcription Factors
Show Abstract · Added June 28, 2019
Transcription factors positively and/or negatively impact gene expression by recruiting coregulatory factors, which interact through protein-protein binding. Here we demonstrate that mouse pancreas size and islet β-cell function are controlled by the ATP-dependent Swi/Snf chromatin remodeling coregulatory complex that physically associates with Pdx1, a diabetes-linked transcription factor essential to pancreatic morphogenesis and adult islet cell function and maintenance. Early embryonic deletion of just the Swi/Snf Brg1 ATPase subunit reduced multipotent pancreatic progenitor cell proliferation and resulted in pancreas hypoplasia. In contrast, removal of both Swi/Snf ATPase subunits, Brg1 and Brm, was necessary to compromise adult islet β-cell activity, which included whole-animal glucose intolerance, hyperglycemia, and impaired insulin secretion. Notably, lineage-tracing analysis revealed Swi/Snf-deficient β-cells lost the ability to produce the mRNAs for and other key metabolic genes without effecting the expression of many essential islet-enriched transcription factors. Swi/Snf was necessary for Pdx1 to bind to the gene enhancer, demonstrating the importance of this association in mediating chromatin accessibility. These results illustrate how fundamental the Pdx1:Swi/Snf coregulator complex is in the pancreas, and we discuss how disrupting their association could influence type 1 and type 2 diabetes susceptibility.
© 2019 by the American Diabetes Association.
1 Communities
3 Members
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15 MeSH Terms
β-Cell-intrinsic β-arrestin 1 signaling enhances sulfonylurea-induced insulin secretion.
Barella LF, Rossi M, Zhu L, Cui Y, Mei FC, Cheng X, Chen W, Gurevich VV, Wess J
(2019) J Clin Invest 129: 3732-3737
MeSH Terms: Animals, Genotype, Glyburide, Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors, Hypoglycemic Agents, Insulin Secretion, Insulin-Secreting Cells, Male, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Mice, Transgenic, Phenotype, Signal Transduction, Sulfonylurea Compounds, Tolbutamide, beta-Arrestin 1, beta-Arrestin 2
Show Abstract · Added March 18, 2020
Beta-arrestin-1 and -2 (Barr1 and Barr2, respectively) are intracellular signaling molecules that regulate many important metabolic functions. We previously demonstrated that mice lacking Barr2 selectively in pancreatic beta-cells showed pronounced metabolic impairments. Here we investigated whether Barr1 plays a similar role in regulating beta-cell function and whole body glucose homeostasis. Initially, we inactivated the Barr1 gene in beta-cells of adult mice (beta-barr1-KO mice). Beta-barr1-KO mice did not display any obvious phenotypes in a series of in vivo and in vitro metabolic tests. However, glibenclamide and tolbutamide, two widely used antidiabetic drugs of the sulfonylurea (SU) family, showed greatly reduced efficacy in stimulating insulin secretion in the KO mice in vivo and in perifused KO islets in vitro. Additional in vivo and in vitro studies demonstrated that Barr1 enhanced SU-stimulated insulin secretion by promoting SU-mediated activation of Epac2. Pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation experiments showed that Barr1 can directly interact with Epac2 and that SUs such as glibenclamide promote Barr1/Epac2 complex formation, triggering enhanced Rap1 signaling and insulin secretion. These findings suggest that strategies aimed at promoting Barr1 signaling in beta-cells may prove useful for the development of efficacious antidiabetic drugs.
0 Communities
1 Members
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17 MeSH Terms
B lymphocytes protect islet β cells in diabetes prone NOD mice treated with imatinib.
Wilson CS, Spaeth JM, Karp J, Stocks BT, Hoopes EM, Stein RW, Moore DJ
(2019) JCI Insight 5:
MeSH Terms: Animals, Autoimmunity, B-Lymphocytes, Cell Proliferation, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1, Disease Models, Animal, Homeodomain Proteins, Hyperglycemia, Imatinib Mesylate, Insulin, Insulin-Secreting Cells, Islets of Langerhans, Maf Transcription Factors, Large, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Inbred NOD, Mice, Knockout
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2019
Imatinib (Gleevec) reverses type 1 diabetes (T1D) in NOD mice and is currently in clinical trials in individuals with recent-onset disease. While research has demonstrated that imatinib protects islet β cells from the harmful effects of ER stress, the role the immune system plays in its reversal of T1D has been less well understood, and specific cellular immune targets have not been identified. In this study, we demonstrate that B lymphocytes, an immune subset that normally drives diabetes pathology, are unexpectedly required for reversal of hyperglycemia in NOD mice treated with imatinib. In the presence of B lymphocytes, reversal was linked to an increase in serum insulin concentration, but not an increase in islet β cell mass or proliferation. However, improved β cell function was reflected by a partial recovery of MafA transcription factor expression, a sensitive marker of islet β cell stress that is important to adult β cell function. Imatinib treatment was found to increase the antioxidant capacity of B lymphocytes, improving reactive oxygen species (ROS) handling in NOD islets. This study reveals a novel mechanism through which imatinib enables B lymphocytes to orchestrate functional recovery of T1D β cells.
0 Communities
1 Members
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17 MeSH Terms
Point mutations in the PDX1 transactivation domain impair human β-cell development and function.
Wang X, Sterr M, Ansarullah , Burtscher I, Böttcher A, Beckenbauer J, Siehler J, Meitinger T, Häring HU, Staiger H, Cernilogar FM, Schotta G, Irmler M, Beckers J, Wright CVE, Bakhti M, Lickert H
(2019) Mol Metab 24: 80-97
MeSH Terms: Adult, Carboxylic Ester Hydrolases, Cell Differentiation, Cell Line, Diabetes Mellitus, Female, Homeodomain Proteins, Humans, Insulin Secretion, Insulin-Secreting Cells, Loss of Function Mutation, Male, Point Mutation, Protein Domains, RNA, Long Noncoding, Trans-Activators, Transcription Factors
Show Abstract · Added April 2, 2019
OBJECTIVE - Hundreds of missense mutations in the coding region of PDX1 exist; however, if these mutations predispose to diabetes mellitus is unknown.
METHODS - In this study, we screened a large cohort of subjects with increased risk for diabetes and identified two subjects with impaired glucose tolerance carrying common, heterozygous, missense mutations in the PDX1 coding region leading to single amino acid exchanges (P33T, C18R) in its transactivation domain. We generated iPSCs from patients with heterozygous PDX1, PDX1 mutations and engineered isogenic cell lines carrying homozygous PDX1, PDX1 mutations and a heterozygous PDX1 loss-of-function mutation (PDX1).
RESULTS - Using an in vitro β-cell differentiation protocol, we demonstrated that both, heterozygous PDX1, PDX1 and homozygous PDX1, PDX1 mutations impair β-cell differentiation and function. Furthermore, PDX1 and PDX1 mutations reduced differentiation efficiency of pancreatic progenitors (PPs), due to downregulation of PDX1-bound genes, including transcription factors MNX1 and PDX1 as well as insulin resistance gene CES1. Additionally, both PDX1 and PDX1 mutations in PPs reduced the expression of PDX1-bound genes including the long-noncoding RNA, MEG3 and the imprinted gene NNAT, both involved in insulin synthesis and secretion.
CONCLUSIONS - Our results reveal mechanistic details of how common coding mutations in PDX1 impair human pancreatic endocrine lineage formation and β-cell function and contribute to the predisposition for diabetes.
Copyright © 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.
1 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
17 MeSH Terms
Neurog3-Independent Methylation Is the Earliest Detectable Mark Distinguishing Pancreatic Progenitor Identity.
Liu J, Banerjee A, Herring CA, Attalla J, Hu R, Xu Y, Shao Q, Simmons AJ, Dadi PK, Wang S, Jacobson DA, Liu B, Hodges E, Lau KS, Gu G
(2019) Dev Cell 48: 49-63.e7
MeSH Terms: Animals, Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors, Cell Differentiation, Cell Lineage, Endocrine Cells, Homeodomain Proteins, Insulin-Secreting Cells, Islets of Langerhans, Mice, Nerve Tissue Proteins, Organogenesis, Pancreas, Transcription Factors
Show Abstract · Added February 6, 2019
In the developing pancreas, transient Neurog3-expressing progenitors give rise to four major islet cell types: α, β, δ, and γ; when and how the Neurog3 cells choose cell fate is unknown. Using single-cell RNA-seq, trajectory analysis, and combinatorial lineage tracing, we showed here that the Neurog3 cells co-expressing Myt1 (i.e., Myt1Neurog3) were biased toward β cell fate, while those not simultaneously expressing Myt1 (Myt1Neurog3) favored α fate. Myt1 manipulation only marginally affected α versus β cell specification, suggesting Myt1 as a marker but not determinant for islet-cell-type specification. The Myt1Neurog3 cells displayed higher Dnmt1 expression and enhancer methylation at Arx, an α-fate-promoting gene. Inhibiting Dnmts in pancreatic progenitors promoted α cell specification, while Dnmt1 overexpression or Arx enhancer hypermethylation favored β cell production. Moreover, the pancreatic progenitors contained distinct Arx enhancer methylation states without transcriptionally definable sub-populations, a phenotype independent of Neurog3 activity. These data suggest that Neurog3-independent methylation on fate-determining gene enhancers specifies distinct endocrine-cell programs.
Published by Elsevier Inc.
1 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
13 MeSH Terms
Transgene-associated human growth hormone expression in pancreatic β-cells impairs identification of sex-based gene expression differences.
Stancill JS, Osipovich AB, Cartailler JP, Magnuson MA
(2019) Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 316: E196-E209
MeSH Terms: Animals, Female, Gene Expression, Genes, Reporter, Green Fluorescent Proteins, Human Growth Hormone, Humans, Insulin, Insulin-Secreting Cells, Male, Mice, Mice, Transgenic, Promoter Regions, Genetic, RNA, Messenger, Sex Factors, Transgenes
Show Abstract · Added December 14, 2018
Fluorescent protein reporter genes are widely used to identify and sort murine pancreatic β-cells. In this study, we compared use of the MIP-GFP transgene, which exhibits aberrant expression of human growth hormone (hGH), with a newly derived Ins2 allele that lacks hGH expression on the expression of sex-specific genes. β-Cells from MIP-GFP transgenic mice exhibit changes in the expression of 7,733 genes, or greater than half of their transcriptome, compared with β-cells from Ins2 mice. To determine how these differences might affect a typical differential gene expression study, we analyzed the effect of sex on gene expression using both reporter lines. Six hundred fifty-seven differentially expressed genes were identified between male and female β-cells containing the Ins2 allele. Female β-cells exhibit higher expression of Xist, Tmed9, Arpc3, Eml2, and several islet-enriched transcription factors, including Nkx2-2 and Hnf4a, whereas male β-cells exhibited a generally higher expression of genes involved in cell cycle regulation. In marked contrast, the same male vs. female comparison of β-cells containing the MIP-GFP transgene revealed only 115 differentially expressed genes, and comparison of the 2 lists of differentially expressed genes revealed only 17 that were common to both analyses. These results indicate that 1) male and female β-cells differ in their expression of key transcription factors and cell cycle regulators and 2) the MIP-GFP transgene may attenuate sex-specific differences that distinguish male and female β-cells, thereby impairing the identification of sex-specific variations.
2 Communities
3 Members
1 Resources
16 MeSH Terms
Human islets expressing HNF1A variant have defective β cell transcriptional regulatory networks.
Haliyur R, Tong X, Sanyoura M, Shrestha S, Lindner J, Saunders DC, Aramandla R, Poffenberger G, Redick SD, Bottino R, Prasad N, Levy SE, Blind RD, Harlan DM, Philipson LH, Stein RW, Brissova M, Powers AC
(2019) J Clin Invest 129: 246-251
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1, Genetic Variation, Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 1-alpha, Heterozygote, Humans, Insulin-Secreting Cells, Male, Transcription, Genetic
Show Abstract · Added December 7, 2018
Using an integrated approach to characterize the pancreatic tissue and isolated islets from a 33-year-old with 17 years of type 1 diabetes (T1D), we found that donor islets contained β cells without insulitis and lacked glucose-stimulated insulin secretion despite a normal insulin response to cAMP-evoked stimulation. With these unexpected findings for T1D, we sequenced the donor DNA and found a pathogenic heterozygous variant in the gene encoding hepatocyte nuclear factor-1α (HNF1A). In one of the first studies of human pancreatic islets with a disease-causing HNF1A variant associated with the most common form of monogenic diabetes, we found that HNF1A dysfunction leads to insulin-insufficient diabetes reminiscent of T1D by impacting the regulatory processes critical for glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and suggest a rationale for a therapeutic alternative to current treatment.
0 Communities
4 Members
0 Resources
10 MeSH Terms
Ectonucleoside Triphosphate Diphosphohydrolase-3 Antibody Targets Adult Human Pancreatic β Cells for In Vitro and In Vivo Analysis.
Saunders DC, Brissova M, Phillips N, Shrestha S, Walker JT, Aramandla R, Poffenberger G, Flaherty DK, Weller KP, Pelletier J, Cooper T, Goff MT, Virostko J, Shostak A, Dean ED, Greiner DL, Shultz LD, Prasad N, Levy SE, Carnahan RH, Dai C, Sévigny J, Powers AC
(2019) Cell Metab 29: 745-754.e4
MeSH Terms: Adenosine Triphosphatases, Adult, Animals, Biomarkers, Cells, Cultured, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Humans, Insulin-Secreting Cells, Islets of Langerhans, Male, Membrane Proteins, Mice, Mice, Inbred NOD, Pancreas, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added February 4, 2019
Identification of cell-surface markers specific to human pancreatic β cells would allow in vivo analysis and imaging. Here we introduce a biomarker, ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase-3 (NTPDase3), that is expressed on the cell surface of essentially all adult human β cells, including those from individuals with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. NTPDase3 is expressed dynamically during postnatal human pancreas development, appearing first in acinar cells at birth, but several months later its expression declines in acinar cells while concurrently emerging in islet β cells. Given its specificity and membrane localization, we utilized an NTPDase3 antibody for purification of live human β cells as confirmed by transcriptional profiling, and, in addition, for in vivo imaging of transplanted human β cells. Thus, NTPDase3 is a cell-surface biomarker of adult human β cells, and the antibody directed to this protein should be a useful new reagent for β cell sorting, in vivo imaging, and targeting.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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3 Members
0 Resources
16 MeSH Terms
Examining How the MAFB Transcription Factor Affects Islet β-Cell Function Postnatally.
Cyphert HA, Walker EM, Hang Y, Dhawan S, Haliyur R, Bonatakis L, Avrahami D, Brissova M, Kaestner KH, Bhushan A, Powers AC, Stein R
(2019) Diabetes 68: 337-348
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cells, Cultured, Chromatin Immunoprecipitation, Chromosomes, Artificial, Bacterial, DNA Methylation, Female, Humans, In Vitro Techniques, Insulin-Secreting Cells, Maf Transcription Factors, Large, MafB Transcription Factor, Mice, Mice, Transgenic, Pregnancy, Tryptophan Hydroxylase
Show Abstract · Added January 8, 2019
The sustained expression of the MAFB transcription factor in human islet β-cells represents a distinct difference in mice. Moreover, mRNA expression of closely related and islet β-cell-enriched MAFA does not peak in humans until after 9 years of age. We show that the MAFA protein also is weakly produced within the juvenile human islet β-cell population and that expression is postnatally restricted in mouse β-cells by de novo DNA methylation. To gain insight into how MAFB affects human β-cells, we developed a mouse model to ectopically express in adult mouse β-cells using transcriptional control sequences. Coexpression of MafB with MafA had no overt impact on mouse β-cells, suggesting that the human adult β-cell MAFA/MAFB heterodimer is functionally equivalent to the mouse MafA homodimer. However, MafB alone was unable to rescue the islet β-cell defects in a mouse mutant lacking MafA in β-cells. Of note, transgenic production of MafB in β-cells elevated tryptophan hydroxylase 1 mRNA production during pregnancy, which drives the serotonin biosynthesis critical for adaptive maternal β-cell responses. Together, these studies provide novel insight into the role of MAFB in human islet β-cells.
© 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.
1 Communities
0 Members
0 Resources
15 MeSH Terms