Other search tools

About this data

The publication data currently available has been vetted by Vanderbilt faculty, staff, administrators and trainees. The data itself is retrieved directly from NCBI's PubMed and is automatically updated on a weekly basis to ensure accuracy and completeness.

If you have any questions or comments, please contact us.

Results: 1 to 10 of 327

Publication Record

Connections

The Peripheral Peril: Injected Insulin Induces Insulin Insensitivity in Type 1 Diabetes.
Gregory JM, Cherrington AD, Moore DJ
(2020) Diabetes 69: 837-847
MeSH Terms: Animals, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1, Gene Expression Regulation, Humans, Insulin, Insulin Resistance
Show Abstract · Added April 22, 2020
Insulin resistance is an underappreciated facet of type 1 diabetes that occurs with remarkable consistency and considerable magnitude. Although therapeutic innovations are continuing to normalize dysglycemia, a sizable body of data suggests a second metabolic abnormality-iatrogenic hyperinsulinemia-principally drives insulin resistance and its consequences in this population and has not been addressed. We review this evidence to show that injecting insulin into the peripheral circulation bypasses first-pass hepatic insulin clearance, which leads to the unintended metabolic consequence of whole-body insulin resistance. We propose restructuring insulin therapy to restore the physiological insulin balance between the hepatic portal and peripheral circulations and thereby avoid the complications of life-long insulin resistance. As technology rapidly advances and our ability to ensure euglycemia improves, iatrogenic insulin resistance will become the final barrier to overcome to restore normal physiology, health, and life in type 1 diabetes.
© 2020 by the American Diabetes Association.
0 Communities
2 Members
0 Resources
6 MeSH Terms
Metabolic effects of skeletal muscle-specific deletion of beta-arrestin-1 and -2 in mice.
Meister J, Bone DBJ, Godlewski G, Liu Z, Lee RJ, Vishnivetskiy SA, Gurevich VV, Springer D, Kunos G, Wess J
(2019) PLoS Genet 15: e1008424
MeSH Terms: Animals, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Diet, High-Fat, Disease Models, Animal, Glucose, Glucose Clamp Technique, Glycogen, Humans, Insulin, Insulin Resistance, Male, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Muscle, Skeletal, Obesity, Signal Transduction, beta-Arrestin 1, beta-Arrestin 2
Show Abstract · Added March 18, 2020
Type 2 diabetes (T2D) has become a major health problem worldwide. Skeletal muscle (SKM) is the key tissue for whole-body glucose disposal and utilization. New drugs aimed at improving insulin sensitivity of SKM would greatly expand available therapeutic options. β-arrestin-1 and -2 (Barr1 and Barr2, respectively) are two intracellular proteins best known for their ability to mediate the desensitization and internalization of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Recent studies suggest that Barr1 and Barr2 regulate several important metabolic functions including insulin release and hepatic glucose production. Since SKM expresses many GPCRs, including the metabolically important β2-adrenergic receptor, the goal of this study was to examine the potential roles of Barr1 and Barr2 in regulating SKM and whole-body glucose metabolism. Using SKM-specific knockout (KO) mouse lines, we showed that the loss of SKM Barr2, but not of SKM Barr1, resulted in mild improvements in glucose tolerance in diet-induced obese mice. SKM-specific Barr1- and Barr2-KO mice did not show any significant differences in exercise performance. However, lack of SKM Barr2 led to increased glycogen breakdown following a treadmill exercise challenge. Interestingly, mice that lacked both Barr1 and Barr2 in SKM showed no significant metabolic phenotypes. Thus, somewhat surprisingly, our data indicate that SKM β-arrestins play only rather subtle roles (SKM Barr2) in regulating whole-body glucose homeostasis and SKM insulin sensitivity.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
MeSH Terms
Impact of Acipimox Therapy on Free Fatty Acid Efflux and Endothelial Function in the Metabolic Syndrome: A Randomized Trial.
Aday AW, Goldfine AB, Gregory JM, Beckman JA
(2019) Obesity (Silver Spring) 27: 1812-1819
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Blood Glucose, Cross-Over Studies, Double-Blind Method, Endothelium, Vascular, Fatty Acids, Nonesterified, Female, Humans, Hypolipidemic Agents, Insulin, Insulin Resistance, Lipid Metabolism, Male, Metabolic Syndrome, Middle Aged, Pyrazines, Vasodilation
Show Abstract · Added October 2, 2019
OBJECTIVE - Insulin resistance is associated with increased lipolysis and elevated concentrations of free fatty acids (FFA), which in turn contribute to impaired vascular function. It was hypothesized that lowering FFA with acipimox, a nicotinic acid derivative that impairs FFA efflux, would improve endothelial function, measured by flow-mediated dilation (FMD), in individuals with metabolic syndrome.
METHODS - A total of 18 participants with metabolic syndrome and 17 healthy controls were enrolled and treated with acipimox 250 mg orally every 6 hours or placebo for 7 days in a randomized, double-blind, crossover trial.
RESULTS - Acipimox reduced FFA concentrations among individuals with metabolic syndrome to near normal levels (P = 0.01), but there was no change among healthy controls (P = 0.17). Acipimox did not improve endothelial-dependent FMD in either group (metabolic syndrome: P = 0.42; healthy controls: P = 0.16), although endothelial-independent nitroglycerin-mediated dilation among those with metabolic syndrome tended to increase (20.3%, P = 0.06). There were no changes in blood lipids or markers of inflammation following therapy. There was minimal correlation between change in FMD and baseline measures of BMI ( ρ = -0.09) or waist circumference ( ρ = -0.15).
CONCLUSIONS - In groups with normal or elevated baseline FFA, short-term reductions do not improve endothelial function assessed by FMD.
© 2019 The Obesity Society.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
18 MeSH Terms
Aerobic exercise training improves hepatic and muscle insulin sensitivity, but reduces splanchnic glucose uptake in obese humans with type 2 diabetes.
Gregory JM, Muldowney JA, Engelhardt BG, Tyree R, Marks-Shulman P, Silver HJ, Donahue EP, Edgerton DS, Winnick JJ
(2019) Nutr Diabetes 9: 25
MeSH Terms: Adult, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Exercise, Female, Glucose, Glucose Clamp Technique, Glucose Tolerance Test, Humans, Insulin Resistance, Liver, Male, Middle Aged, Muscle, Skeletal, Obesity
Show Abstract · Added September 3, 2019
BACKGROUND - Aerobic exercise training is known to have beneficial effects on whole-body glucose metabolism in people with type 2 diabetes (T2D). The responses of the liver to such training are less well understood. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of aerobic exercise training on splanchnic glucose uptake (SGU) and insulin-mediated suppression of endogenous glucose production (EGP) in obese subjects with T2D.
METHODS - Participants included 11 obese humans with T2D, who underwent 15 ± 2 weeks of aerobic exercise training (AEX; n = 6) or remained sedentary for 15 ± 1 weeks (SED; n = 5). After an initial screening visit, each subject underwent an oral glucose load clamp and an isoglycemic/two-step (20 and 40 mU/m/min) hyperinsulinemic clamp (ISO-clamp) to assess SGU and insulin-mediated suppression of EGP, respectively. After the intervention period, both tests were repeated.
RESULTS - In AEX, the ability of insulin to suppress EGP was improved during both the low (69 ± 9 and 80 ± 6% suppression; pre-post, respectively; p < 0.05) and high (67 ± 6 and 82 ± 4% suppression, respectively; p < 0.05) insulin infusion periods. Despite markedly improved muscle insulin sensitivity, SGU was reduced in AEX after training (22.9 ± 3.3 and 9.1 ± 6.0 g pre-post in AEX, respectively; p < 0.05).
CONCLUSIONS - In obese T2D subjects, exercise training improves whole-body glucose metabolism, in part, by improving insulin-mediated suppression of EGP and enhancing muscle glucose uptake, which occur despite reduced SGU during an oral glucose challenge.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
14 MeSH Terms
The effect of the EP3 antagonist DG-041 on male mice with diet-induced obesity.
Ceddia RP, Downey JD, Morrison RD, Kraemer MP, Davis SE, Wu J, Lindsley CW, Yin H, Daniels JS, Breyer RM
(2019) Prostaglandins Other Lipid Mediat 144: 106353
MeSH Terms: Acrylamides, Animals, Blood Pressure, Body Weight, Diet, High-Fat, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Insulin Resistance, Male, Mice, Muscle, Skeletal, Obesity, Phenotype, Receptors, Prostaglandin E, EP3 Subtype, Sulfones, Triglycerides
Show Abstract · Added September 4, 2019
BACKGROUND/AIMS - The prostaglandin E (PGE) EP3 receptor has a multifaceted role in metabolism. Drugs targeting EP3 have been proposed as therapeutics for diabetes; however, studies utilizing global EP3 knockout mice suggest that EP3 blockade increases obesity and insulin resistance. The present studies attempt to determine the effect of acute EP3 antagonist treatment on the diabetic phenotype.
METHODS - DG-041 was confirmed to be a high affinity antagonist at the mouse EP3 receptor by competition radioligand binding and by blockade of EP3-mediated responses. DG-041 pharmacokinetic studies were performed to determine the most efficacious route of administration. Male C57BL/6 × BALB/c (CB6F1) mice were fed diets containing 10%, 45%, or 60% calories from fat to induce obesity. Changes to the metabolic phenotype in these mice were evaluated after one week treatment with DG-041.
RESULTS - Subcutaneous injections of DG-041 at 20 mg/kg blocked the sulprostone-evoked rise in mean arterial pressure confirming the efficacy of this administration regime. Seven day treatment with DG-041 had minimal effect on body composition or glycemic control. DG-041 administration caused a reduction in skeletal muscle triglyceride content while showing a trend toward increased hepatic triglycerides.
CONCLUSION - Short term EP3 administration of DG-041 produced effective blockade of the EP3 receptor and decreased skeletal muscle triglyceride content but had no significant effects on the diabetic phenotype.
Published by Elsevier Inc.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
16 MeSH Terms
Iatrogenic Hyperinsulinemia, Not Hyperglycemia, Drives Insulin Resistance in Type 1 Diabetes as Revealed by Comparison With GCK-MODY (MODY2).
Gregory JM, Smith TJ, Slaughter JC, Mason HR, Hughey CC, Smith MS, Kandasamy B, Greeley SAW, Philipson LH, Naylor RN, Letourneau LR, Abumrad NN, Cherrington AD, Moore DJ
(2019) Diabetes 68: 1565-1576
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Female, Humans, Hyperglycemia, Hyperinsulinism, Insulin Resistance, Male, Middle Aged, Models, Theoretical, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added May 17, 2019
Although insulin resistance consistently occurs with type 1 diabetes, its predominant driver is uncertain. We therefore determined the relative contributions of hyperglycemia and iatrogenic hyperinsulinemia to insulin resistance using hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps in three participant groups ( = 10/group) with differing insulinemia and glycemia: healthy control subjects (euinsulinemia and euglycemia), glucokinase-maturity-onset diabetes of the young (GCK-MODY; euinsulinemia and hyperglycemia), and type 1 diabetes (hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia matching GCK-MODY). We assessed the contribution of hyperglycemia by comparing insulin sensitivity in control and GCK-MODY and the contribution of hyperinsulinemia by comparing GCK-MODY and type 1 diabetes. Hemoglobin A was normal in control subjects and similarly elevated for type 1 diabetes and GCK-MODY. Basal insulin levels in control subjects and GCK-MODY were nearly equal but were 2.5-fold higher in type 1 diabetes. Low-dose insulin infusion suppressed endogenous glucose production similarly in all groups and suppressed nonesterified fatty acids similarly between control subjects and GCK-MODY, but to a lesser extent for type 1 diabetes. High-dose insulin infusion stimulated glucose disposal similarly in control subjects and GCK-MODY but was 29% and 22% less effective in type 1 diabetes, respectively. Multivariable linear regression showed that insulinemia-but not glycemia-was significantly associated with muscle insulin sensitivity. These data suggest that iatrogenic hyperinsulinemia predominates in driving insulin resistance in type 1 diabetes.
© 2019 by the American Diabetes Association.
0 Communities
2 Members
0 Resources
12 MeSH Terms
Impaired insulin signaling in the B10.D2--/oSnJ mouse model of complement factor 5 deficiency.
Peterson KR, Gutierrez DA, Kikuchi T, Anderson-Baucum EK, Winn NC, Shuey MM, Bolus WR, McGuinness OP, Hasty AH
(2019) Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 317: E200-E211
MeSH Terms: Adenoviridae, Animals, Complement C5, Disease Models, Animal, Energy Metabolism, Glucose Intolerance, Hereditary Complement Deficiency Diseases, Insulin Resistance, Mice, Mice, Inbred AKR, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Inbred CBA, Mice, Inbred DBA, Mice, Inbred NOD, Mice, Transgenic, Signal Transduction, Transduction, Genetic
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
Given the chemoattractant potential of complement factor 5 (C5) and its increased expression in adipose tissue (AT) of obese mice, we determined whether this protein of the innate immune system impacts insulin action. C5 control (C5) and spontaneously C5-deficient (C5, B10.D2--/oSnJ) mice were placed on low- and high-fat diets to investigate their inflammatory and metabolic phenotypes. Adenoviral delivery was used to evaluate the effects of exogenous C5 on systemic metabolism. C5 mice gained less weight than controls while fed a high-fat diet, accompanied by reduced AT inflammation, liver mass, and liver triglyceride content. Despite these beneficial metabolic effects, C5 mice demonstrated severe glucose intolerance and systemic insulin resistance, as well as impaired insulin signaling in liver and AT. C5 mice also exhibited decreased expression of insulin receptor (INSR) gene and protein, as well as improper processing of pro-INSR. These changes were not due to the C5 deficiency alone as other C5-deficient models did not recapitulate the INSR processing defect; rather, in addition to the mutation in the gene, whole genome sequencing revealed an intronic 31-bp deletion in the gene in the B10.D2--/oSnJ model. Irrespective of the genetic defect, adenoviral delivery of C5 improved insulin sensitivity in both C5 and C5 mice, indicating an insulin-sensitizing function of C5.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
MeSH Terms
Metabolic Effects of Bile Acids: Potential Role in Bariatric Surgery.
Flynn CR, Albaugh VL, Abumrad NN
(2019) Cell Mol Gastroenterol Hepatol 8: 235-246
MeSH Terms: Akkermansia, Animals, Bariatric Surgery, Bile Acids and Salts, Humans, Insulin Resistance, Obesity, Morbid, Receptors, Cytoplasmic and Nuclear, Signal Transduction, Verrucomicrobia
Show Abstract · Added December 17, 2019
Bariatric surgery is the most effective and durable treatment for morbid obesity, with an unexplained yet beneficial side effect of restoring insulin sensitivity and improving glycemia, often before weight loss is observed. Among the many contributing mechanisms often cited, the altered handling of intestinal bile acids is of considerable therapeutic interest. Here, we review a growing body of literature examining the metabolic effects of bile acids ranging from their physical roles in dietary fat handling within the intestine to their functions as endocrine and paracrine hormones in potentiating responses to bariatric surgery. The roles of 2 important bile acid receptors, Takeda G-protein coupled receptor (also known as G-protein coupled bile acid receptor) and farnesoid X receptor, are highlighted as is downstream signaling through glucagon-like polypeptide 1 and its cognate receptor. Additional improvements in other phenotypes and potential contributions of commensal gut bacteria, such as Akkermansia muciniphila, which are manifest after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and other emulations, such as gallbladder bile diversion to the ileum, are also discussed.
Copyright © 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
10 MeSH Terms
Rapid changes in the microvascular circulation of skeletal muscle impair insulin delivery during sepsis.
Mignemi NA, McClatchey PM, Kilchrist KV, Williams IM, Millis BA, Syring KE, Duvall CL, Wasserman DH, McGuinness OP
(2019) Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 316: E1012-E1023
MeSH Terms: Animals, Capillaries, Capillary Permeability, Disease Models, Animal, Echocardiography, Hyperglycemia, Insulin, Insulin Resistance, Lipopolysaccharides, Mice, Microcirculation, Microvessels, Muscle Fibers, Skeletal, Muscle, Skeletal, Sepsis
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
Sepsis costs the healthcare system $23 billion annually and has a mortality rate between 10 and 40%. An early indication of sepsis is the onset of hyperglycemia, which is the result of sepsis-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. Previous investigations have focused on events in the myocyte (e.g., insulin signaling and glucose transport and subsequent metabolism) as the causes for this insulin-resistant state. However, the delivery of insulin to the skeletal muscle is also an important determinant of insulin action. Skeletal muscle microvascular blood flow, which delivers the insulin to the muscle, is known to be decreased during sepsis. Here we test whether the reduced capillary blood flow to skeletal muscle belies the sepsis-induced insulin resistance by reducing insulin delivery to the myocyte. We hypothesize that decreased capillary flow and consequent decrease in insulin delivery is an early event that precedes gross cardiovascular alterations seen with sepsis. This hypothesis was examined in mice treated with either lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or polymicrobial sepsis followed by intravital microscopy of the skeletal muscle microcirculation. We calculated insulin delivery to the myocyte using two independent methods and found that LPS and sepsis rapidly reduce insulin delivery to the skeletal muscle by ~50%; this was driven by decreases in capillary flow velocity and the number of perfused capillaries. Furthermore, the changes in skeletal muscle microcirculation occur before changes in both cardiac output and arterial blood pressure. These data suggest that a rapid reduction in skeletal muscle insulin delivery contributes to the induction of insulin resistance during sepsis.
1 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
15 MeSH Terms
Energy metabolism couples hepatocyte integrin-linked kinase to liver glucoregulation and postabsorptive responses of mice in an age-dependent manner.
Trefts E, Hughey CC, Lantier L, Lark DS, Boyd KL, Pozzi A, Zent R, Wasserman DH
(2019) Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 316: E1118-E1135
MeSH Terms: Age Factors, Animals, Blood Glucose, Cell Differentiation, Cell Respiration, Energy Metabolism, Gene Knockout Techniques, Glucose, Glucose Tolerance Test, Hepatocytes, Homeostasis, Inflammation, Insulin, Insulin Resistance, Liver, Liver Cirrhosis, Mice, Obesity, Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
Integrin-linked kinase (ILK) is a critical intracellular signaling node for integrin receptors. Its role in liver development is complex, as ILK deletion at E10.5 (before hepatocyte differentiation) results in biochemical and morphological differences that resolve as mice age. Nevertheless, mice with ILK depleted specifically in hepatocytes are protected from the hepatic insulin resistance during obesity. Despite the potential importance of hepatocyte ILK to metabolic health, it is unknown how ILK controls hepatic metabolism or glucoregulation. The present study tested the role of ILK in hepatic metabolism and glucoregulation by deleting it specifically in hepatocytes, using a cre-lox system that begins expression at E15.5 (after initiation of hepatocyte differentiation). These mice develop the most severe morphological and glucoregulatory abnormalities at 6 wk, but these gradually resolve with age. After identifying when the deletion of ILK caused a severe metabolic phenotype, in depth studies were performed at this time point to define the metabolic programs that coordinate control of glucoregulation that are regulated by ILK. We show that 6-wk-old ILK-deficient mice have higher glucose tolerance and decreased net glycogen synthesis. Additionally, ILK was shown to be necessary for transcription of mitochondrial-related genes, oxidative metabolism, and maintenance of cellular energy status. Thus, ILK is required for maintaining hepatic transcriptional and metabolic programs that sustain oxidative metabolism, which are required for hepatic maintenance of glucose homeostasis.
1 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
19 MeSH Terms