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Glucose autoregulation is the dominant component of the hormone-independent counterregulatory response to hypoglycemia in the conscious dog.
Gregory JM, Rivera N, Kraft G, Winnick JJ, Farmer B, Allen EJ, Donahue EP, Smith MS, Edgerton DS, Williams PE, Cherrington AD
(2017) Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 313: E273-E283
MeSH Terms: Adipose Tissue, Adrenalectomy, Animals, Blood Glucose, Dogs, Gluconeogenesis, Glucose, Glucose Clamp Technique, Homeostasis, Hypoglycemia, Hypoglycemic Agents, Infusions, Intravenous, Insulin, Liver, Liver Glycogen, Muscle, Skeletal, Norepinephrine, Portal Vein, Sympathetic Nervous System
Show Abstract · Added April 23, 2018
The contribution of hormone-independent counterregulatory signals in defense of insulin-induced hypoglycemia was determined in adrenalectomized, overnight-fasted conscious dogs receiving hepatic portal vein insulin infusions at a rate 20-fold basal. Either euglycemia was maintained () or hypoglycemia (≈45 mg/dl) was allowed to occur. There were three hypoglycemic groups: one in which hepatic autoregulation against hypoglycemia occurred in the absence of sympathetic nervous system input (), one in which autoregulation occurred in the presence of norepinephrine (NE) signaling to fat and muscle (), and one in which autoregulation occurred in the presence of NE signaling to fat, muscle, and liver (). Average net hepatic glucose balance (NHGB) during the last hour for was -0.7 ± 0.1, 0.3 ± 0.1 ( < 0.01 vs. ), 0.7 ± 0.1 ( = 0.01 vs. ), and 0.8 ± 0.1 ( = 0.7 vs. ) mg·kg·min, respectively. Hypoglycemia per se () increased NHGB by causing an inhibition of net hepatic glycogen synthesis. NE signaling to fat and muscle () increased NHGB further by mobilizing gluconeogenic precursors resulting in a rise in gluconeogenesis. Lowering glucose per se decreased nonhepatic glucose uptake by 8.9 mg·kg·min, and the addition of increased neural efferent signaling to muscle and fat blocked glucose uptake further by 3.2 mg·kg·min The addition of increased neural efferent input to liver did not affect NHGB or nonhepatic glucose uptake significantly. In conclusion, even in the absence of increases in counterregulatory hormones, the body can defend itself against hypoglycemia using glucose autoregulation and increased neural efferent signaling, both of which stimulate hepatic glucose production and limit glucose utilization.
Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.
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MeSH Terms
Metabolic responses to exogenous ghrelin in obesity and early after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass in humans.
Tamboli RA, Antoun J, Sidani RM, Clements A, Harmata EE, Marks-Shulman P, Gaylinn BD, Williams B, Clements RH, Albaugh VL, Abumrad NN
(2017) Diabetes Obes Metab 19: 1267-1275
MeSH Terms: Acylation, Anti-Obesity Agents, Cohort Studies, Combined Modality Therapy, Cross-Over Studies, Energy Metabolism, Gastric Bypass, Ghrelin, Gluconeogenesis, Glucose Clamp Technique, Human Growth Hormone, Humans, Infusions, Intravenous, Insulin Resistance, Liver, Muscle, Skeletal, Obesity, Morbid, Pancreatic Polypeptide, Pancreatic Polypeptide-Secreting Cells, Pituitary Gland, Anterior, Postoperative Care, Preoperative Care, Protein Precursors, Single-Blind Method
Show Abstract · Added April 3, 2017
AIMS - Ghrelin is a gastric-derived hormone that stimulates growth hormone (GH) secretion and has a multi-faceted role in the regulation of energy homeostasis, including glucose metabolism. Circulating ghrelin concentrations are modulated in response to nutritional status, but responses to ghrelin in altered metabolic states are poorly understood. We investigated the metabolic effects of ghrelin in obesity and early after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB).
MATERIALS AND METHODS - We assessed central and peripheral metabolic responses to acyl ghrelin infusion (1 pmol kg  min ) in healthy, lean subjects (n = 9) and non-diabetic, obese subjects (n = 9) before and 2 weeks after RYGB. Central responses were assessed by GH and pancreatic polypeptide (surrogate for vagal activity) secretion. Peripheral responses were assessed by hepatic and skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity during a hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp.
RESULTS - Ghrelin-stimulated GH secretion was attenuated in obese subjects, but was restored by RYGB to a response similar to that of lean subjects. The heightened pancreatic polypeptide response to ghrelin infusion in the obese was attenuated after RYGB. Hepatic glucose production and hepatic insulin sensitivity were not altered by ghrelin infusion in RYGB subjects. Skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity was impaired to a similar degree in lean, obese and post-RYGB individuals in response to ghrelin infusion.
CONCLUSIONS - These data suggest that obesity is characterized by abnormal central, but not peripheral, responsiveness to ghrelin that can be restored early after RYGB before significant weight loss. Further work is necessary to fully elucidate the role of ghrelin in the metabolic changes that occur in obesity and following RYGB.
© 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
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24 MeSH Terms
Jejunal administration of glucose enhances acyl ghrelin suppression in obese humans.
Tamboli RA, Sidani RM, Garcia AE, Antoun J, Isbell JM, Albaugh VL, Abumrad NN
(2016) Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 311: E252-9
MeSH Terms: Adult, Blood Glucose, Female, Gastric Bypass, Gastric Inhibitory Polypeptide, Ghrelin, Glucagon-Like Peptide 1, Glucose, Glucose Clamp Technique, Humans, Infusions, Intravenous, Insulin, Jejunum, Male, Obesity
Show Abstract · Added July 5, 2016
Ghrelin is a gastric hormone that stimulates hunger and worsens glucose metabolism. Circulating ghrelin is decreased after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery; however, the mechanism(s) underlying this change is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that jejunal nutrient exposure plays a significant role in ghrelin suppression after RYGB. Feeding tubes were placed in the stomach or jejunum in 13 obese subjects to simulate pre-RYGB or post-RYGB glucose exposure to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, respectively, without the confounding effects of caloric restriction, weight loss, and surgical stress. On separate study days, the plasma glucose curves obtained with either gastric or jejunal administration of glucose were replicated with intravenous (iv) infusions of glucose. These "isoglycemic clamps" enabled us to determine the contribution of the GI tract and postabsorptive plasma glucose to acyl ghrelin suppression. Plasma acyl ghrelin levels were suppressed to a greater degree with jejunal glucose administration compared with gastric glucose administration (P < 0.05). Jejunal administration of glucose also resulted in a greater suppression of acyl ghrelin than the corresponding isoglycemic glucose infusion (P ≤ 0.01). However, gastric and isoglycemic iv glucose infusions resulted in similar degrees of acyl ghrelin suppression (P > 0.05). Direct exposure of the proximal jejunum to glucose increases acyl ghrelin suppression independent of circulating glucose levels. The enhanced suppression of acyl ghrelin after RYGB may be due to a nutrient-initiated signal in the jejunum that regulates ghrelin secretion.
Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.
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15 MeSH Terms
Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Extended Infusion Versus Short Infusion Piperacillin-Tazobactam in Critically Ill Patients Undergoing CRRT.
Shotwell MS, Nesbitt R, Madonia PN, Gould ER, Connor MJ, Salem C, Aduroja OA, Amde M, Groszek JJ, Wei P, Taylor ME, Tolwani AJ, Fissell WH
(2016) Clin J Am Soc Nephrol 11: 1377-83
MeSH Terms: Acute Kidney Injury, Adult, Aged, Anti-Bacterial Agents, Bacterial Infections, Critical Illness, Dialysis Solutions, Female, Hemodiafiltration, Humans, Infusions, Intravenous, Male, Middle Aged, Penicillanic Acid, Piperacillin, Piperacillin, Tazobactam Drug Combination, Time Factors
Show Abstract · Added June 2, 2016
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES - Infection is the most common cause of death in severe AKI, but many patients receiving continuous RRT do not reach target antibiotic concentrations in plasma. Extended infusion of β-lactams is associated with improved target attainment in critically ill patients; thus, we hypothesized that extended infusion piperacillin-tazobactam would improve piperacillin target attainment compared with short infusion in patients receiving continuous RRT.
DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, & MEASUREMENTS - We conducted an institutional review board-approved observational cohort study of piperacillin-tazobactam pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in critically ill patients receiving continuous venovenous hemodialysis and hemodiafiltration at three tertiary care hospitals between 2007 and 2015. Antibiotic concentrations in blood and/or dialysate samples were measured by liquid chromatography, and one- and two-compartment pharmacokinetic models were fitted to the data using nonlinear mixed effects regression. Target attainment for piperacillin was defined as achieving four times the minimum inhibitory concentration of 16 μg/ml for >50% of the dosing cycle. The probabilities of target attainment for a range of doses, frequencies, and infusion durations were estimated using a Monte Carlo simulation method. Target attainment was also examined as a function of patient weight and continuous RRT effluent rate.
RESULTS - Sixty-eight participants had data for analysis. Regardless of infusion duration, 6 g/d piperacillin was associated with ≤45% target attainment, whereas 12 g/d was associated with ≥95% target attainment. For 8 and 9 g/d, target attainment ranged between 68% and 85%. The probability of target attainment was lower at higher effluent rates and patient weights. For all doses, frequencies, patient weights, and continuous RRT effluent rates, extended infusion was associated with higher probability of target attainment compared with short infusion.
CONCLUSIONS - Extended infusions of piperacillin-tazobactam are associated with greater probability of target attainment in patients receiving continuous RRT.
Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.
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17 MeSH Terms
Extravasation Risk Using Ultrasound-guided Peripheral Intravenous Catheters for Computed Tomography Contrast Administration.
Rupp JD, Ferre RM, Boyd JS, Dearing E, McNaughton CD, Liu D, Jarrell KL, McWade CM, Self WH
(2016) Acad Emerg Med 23: 918-21
MeSH Terms: Administration, Intravenous, Adult, Catheterization, Peripheral, Contrast Media, Emergency Service, Hospital, Extravasation of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Materials, Female, Humans, Infusions, Intravenous, Injections, Intravenous, Logistic Models, Male, Middle Aged, Retrospective Studies, Risk Factors, Tomography, X-Ray Computed, Ultrasonography, Vascular Access Devices
Show Abstract · Added April 6, 2017
OBJECTIVE - Ultrasound-guided intravenous catheter (USGIV) insertion is increasingly being used for administration of intravenous (IV) contrast for computed tomography (CT) scans. The goal of this investigation was to evaluate the risk of contrast extravasation among patients receiving contrast through USGIV catheters.
METHODS - A retrospective observational study of adult patients who underwent a contrast-enhanced CT scan at a tertiary care emergency department during a recent 64-month period was conducted. The unadjusted prevalence of contrast extravasation was compared between patients with an USGIV and those with a standard peripheral IV inserted without ultrasound. Then, a two-stage sampling design was used to select a subset of the population for a multivariable logistic regression model evaluating USGIVs as a risk factor for extravasation while adjusting for potential confounders.
RESULTS - In total, 40,143 patients underwent a contrasted CT scan, including 364 (0.9%) who had contrast administered through an USGIV. Unadjusted prevalence of extravasation was 3.6% for contrast administration through USGIVs and 0.3% for standard IVs (relative risk = 13.9, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 7.9 to 24.6). After potential confounders were adjusted for, CT contrast administered through USGIVs was associated with extravasation (adjusted odds ratio = 8.6, 95% CI = 4.6 to 16.2). No patients required surgical management for contrast extravasation; one patient in the standard IV group was admitted for observation due to extravasation.
CONCLUSIONS - Patients who received contrast for a CT scan through an USGIV had a higher risk of extravasation than those who received contrast through a standard peripheral IV. Clinicians should consider this extravasation risk when weighing the risks and benefits of a contrast-enhanced CT scan in a patient with USGIV vascular access.
© 2016 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.
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18 MeSH Terms
Impact of intravenous fluid composition on outcomes in patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome.
Shaw AD, Schermer CR, Lobo DN, Munson SH, Khangulov V, Hayashida DK, Kellum JA
(2015) Crit Care 19: 334
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Crystalloid Solutions, Female, Fluid Therapy, Humans, Infusions, Intravenous, Isotonic Solutions, Length of Stay, Male, Middle Aged, Severity of Illness Index, Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome, Treatment Outcome, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added October 20, 2015
INTRODUCTION - Intravenous (IV) fluids may be associated with complications not often attributed to fluid type. Fluids with high chloride concentrations such as 0.9 % saline have been associated with adverse outcomes in surgery and critical care. Understanding the association between fluid type and outcomes in general hospitalized patients may inform selection of fluid type in clinical practice. We sought to determine if the type of IV fluid administered to patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is associated with outcome.
METHODS - This was a propensity-matched cohort study in hospitalized patients receiving at least 500 mL IV crystalloid within 48 hours of SIRS. Patient data was extracted from a large multi-hospital electronic health record database between January 1, 2009, and March 31, 2013. The primary outcome was in-hospital mortality. Secondary outcomes included length of stay, readmission, and complications measured by ICD-9 coding and clinical definitions. Outcomes were adjusted for illness severity using the Acute Physiology Score. Of the 91,069 patients meeting inclusion criteria, 89,363 (98%) received 0.9% saline whereas 1706 (2%) received a calcium-free balanced solution as the primary fluid.
RESULTS - There were 3116 well-matched patients, 1558 in each cohort. In comparison with the calcium-free balanced cohort, the saline cohort experienced greater in-hospital mortality (3.27% vs. 1.03%, P <0.001), length of stay (4.87 vs. 4.38 days, P = 0.016), frequency of readmission at 60 (13.54 vs. 10.91, P = 0.025) and 90 days (16.56 vs. 12.58, P = 0.002) and frequency of cardiac, infectious, and coagulopathy complications (all P < 0.002). Outcomes were defined by administrative coding and clinically were internally consistent. Patients in the saline cohort received more chloride and had electrolyte abnormalities requiring replacement more frequently (P < 0.001). No differences were found in acute renal failure.
CONCLUSIONS - In this large electronic health record, the predominant use of 0.9% saline in patients with SIRS was associated with significantly greater morbidity and mortality compared with predominant use of balanced fluids. The signal is consistent with that reported previously in perioperative and critical care patients. Given the large population of hospitalized patients receiving IV fluids, these differences may confer treatment implications and warrant corroboration via large clinical trials.
TRIAL REGISTRATION - NCT02083198 clinicaltrials.gov; March 5, 2014.
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Platelet Inhibitors Reduce Rupture in a Mouse Model of Established Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm.
Owens AP, Edwards TL, Antoniak S, Geddings JE, Jahangir E, Wei WQ, Denny JC, Boulaftali Y, Bergmeier W, Daugherty A, Sampson UKA, Mackman N
(2015) Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 35: 2032-2041
MeSH Terms: Aged, Angiotensin II, Animals, Aorta, Abdominal, Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal, Aortic Rupture, Disease Models, Animal, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Infusions, Intravenous, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors
Show Abstract · Added February 22, 2016
OBJECTIVE - Rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysms causes a high morbidity and mortality in the elderly population. Platelet-rich thrombi form on the surface of aneurysms and may contribute to disease progression. In this study, we used a pharmacological approach to examine a role of platelets in established aneurysms induced by angiotensin II infusion into hypercholesterolemic mice.
APPROACH AND RESULTS - Administration of the platelet inhibitors aspirin or clopidogrel bisulfate to established abdominal aortic aneurysms dramatically reduced rupture. These platelet inhibitors reduced abdominal aortic platelet and macrophage recruitment resulting in decreased active matrix metalloproteinase-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9. Platelet inhibitors also resulted in reduced plasma concentrations of platelet factor 4, cytokines, and components of the plasminogen activation system in mice. To determine the validity of these findings in human subjects, a cohort of aneurysm patients were retrospectively analyzed using developed and validated algorithms in the electronic medical record database at Vanderbilt University. Similar to mice, administration of aspirin or P2Y12 inhibitors was associated with reduced death among patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm.
CONCLUSIONS - These results suggest that platelets contribute to abdominal aortic aneurysm progression and rupture.
© 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.
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15 MeSH Terms
Perioperative intravenous acetaminophen attenuates lipid peroxidation in adults undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass: a randomized clinical trial.
Billings FT, Petracek MR, Roberts LJ, Pretorius M
(2015) PLoS One 10: e0117625
MeSH Terms: Acetaminophen, Aged, Coronary Artery Bypass, Double-Blind Method, Female, Humans, Infusions, Intravenous, Lipid Peroxidation, Male, Middle Aged, Placebos, Prospective Studies
Show Abstract · Added February 22, 2016
BACKGROUND - Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) lyses erythrocytes and induces lipid peroxidation, indicated by increasing plasma concentrations of free hemoglobin, F2-isoprostanes, and isofurans. Acetaminophen attenuates hemeprotein-mediated lipid peroxidation, reduces plasma and urine concentrations of F2-isoprostanes, and preserves kidney function in an animal model of rhabdomyolysis. Acetaminophen also attenuates plasma concentrations of isofurans in children undergoing CPB. The effect of acetaminophen on lipid peroxidation in adults has not been studied. This was a pilot study designed to test the hypothesis that acetaminophen attenuates lipid peroxidation in adults undergoing CPB and to generate data for a clinical trial aimed to reduce acute kidney injury following cardiac surgery.
METHODS AND RESULTS - In a prospective double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial, sixty adult patients were randomized to receive intravenous acetaminophen or placebo starting prior to initiation of CPB and for every 6 hours for 4 doses. Acetaminophen concentrations measured 30 min into CPB and post-CPB were 11.9 ± 0.6 μg/mL (78.9 ± 3.9 μM) and 8.7 ± 0.3 μg/mL (57.6 ± 2.0 μM), respectively. Plasma free hemoglobin increased more than 15-fold during CPB, and haptoglobin decreased 73%, indicating hemolysis. Plasma and urinary markers of lipid peroxidation also increased during CPB but returned to baseline by the first postoperative day. Acetaminophen reduced plasma isofuran concentrations over the duration of the study (P = 0.05), and the intraoperative plasma isofuran concentrations that corresponded to peak hemolysis were attenuated in those subjects randomized to acetaminophen (P = 0.03). Perioperative acetaminophen did not affect plasma concentrations of F2-isoprostanes or urinary markers of lipid peroxidation.
CONCLUSIONS - Intravenous acetaminophen attenuates the increase in intraoperative plasma isofuran concentrations that occurs during CPB, while urinary markers were unaffected.
TRIAL REGISTRATION - ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01366976.
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12 MeSH Terms
Considerations and challenges in defining optimal iron utilization in hemodialysis.
Charytan DM, Pai AB, Chan CT, Coyne DW, Hung AM, Kovesdy CP, Fishbane S, Dialysis Advisory Group of the American Society of Nephrology
(2015) J Am Soc Nephrol 26: 1238-47
MeSH Terms: Anemia, Iron-Deficiency, Animals, Cross-Sectional Studies, Disease Models, Animal, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Drug Administration Schedule, Erythropoietin, Ferritins, Hematinics, Humans, Infusions, Intravenous, Iron Compounds, Kidney Failure, Chronic, Prognosis, Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic, Renal Dialysis, Risk Assessment, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added January 6, 2015
Trials raising concerns about erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, revisions to their labeling, and changes to practice guidelines and dialysis payment systems have provided strong stimuli to decrease erythropoiesis-stimulating agent use and increase intravenous iron administration in recent years. These factors have been associated with a rise in iron utilization, particularly among hemodialysis patients, and an unprecedented increase in serum ferritin concentrations. The mean serum ferritin concentration among United States dialysis patients in 2013 exceeded 800 ng/ml, with 18% of patients exceeding 1200 ng/ml. Although these changes are broad based, the wisdom of these practices is uncertain. Herein, we examine influences on and trends in intravenous iron utilization and assess the clinical trial, epidemiologic, and experimental evidence relevant to its safety and efficacy in the setting of maintenance dialysis. These data suggest a potential for harm from increasing use of parenteral iron in dialysis-dependent patients. In the absence of well powered, randomized clinical trials, available evidence will remain inadequate for making reliable conclusions about the effect of a ubiquitous therapy on mortality or other outcomes of importance to dialysis patients. Nephrology stakeholders have an urgent obligation to initiate well designed investigations of intravenous iron in order to ensure the safety of the dialysis population.
Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.
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18 MeSH Terms
Meta-analysis of high- versus low-chloride content in perioperative and critical care fluid resuscitation.
Krajewski ML, Raghunathan K, Paluszkiewicz SM, Schermer CR, Shaw AD
(2015) Br J Surg 102: 24-36
MeSH Terms: Adult, Chlorides, Critical Care, Crystalloid Solutions, Epidemiologic Methods, Fluid Therapy, Humans, Hypertonic Solutions, Infusions, Intravenous, Isotonic Solutions, Perioperative Care, Rehydration Solutions, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added October 20, 2015
BACKGROUND - The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to assess the relationship between the chloride content of intravenous resuscitation fluids and patient outcomes in the perioperative or intensive care setting.
METHODS - Systematic searches were performed of PubMed/MEDLINE, Embase and Cochrane Library (CENTRAL) databases in accordance with PRISMA guidelines. Randomized clinical trials, controlled clinical trials and observational studies were included if they compared outcomes in acutely ill or surgical patients receiving either high-chloride (ion concentration greater than 111 mmol/l up to and including 154 mmol/l) or lower-chloride (concentration 111 mmol/l or less) crystalloids for resuscitation. Endpoints examined were mortality, measures of kidney function, serum chloride, hyperchloraemia/metabolic acidosis, blood transfusion volume, mechanical ventilation time, and length of hospital and intensive care unit stay. Risk ratios (RRs), mean differences (MDs) or standardized mean differences (SMDs) and confidence intervals were calculated using fixed-effect modelling.
RESULTS - The search identified 21 studies involving 6253 patients. High-chloride fluids did not affect mortality but were associated with a significantly higher risk of acute kidney injury (RR 1.64, 95 per cent c.i. 1.27 to 2.13; P < 0.001) and hyperchloraemia/metabolic acidosis (RR 2.87, 1.95 to 4.21; P < 0.001). High-chloride fluids were also associated with greater serum chloride (MD 3.70 (95 per cent c.i. 3.36 to 4.04) mmol/l; P < 0.001), blood transfusion volume (SMD 0.35, 0.07 to 0.63; P = 0.014) and mechanical ventilation time (SMD 0.15, 0.08 to 0.23; P < 0.001). Sensitivity analyses excluding heavily weighted studies resulted in non-statistically significant effects for acute kidney injury and mechanical ventilation time.
CONCLUSION - A weak but significant association between higher chloride content fluids and unfavourable outcomes was found, but mortality was unaffected by chloride content.
© 2014 The Authors. BJS published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of BJS Society Ltd.
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13 MeSH Terms