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Patent Ductus Arteriosus of the Preterm Infant.
Hamrick SEG, Sallmon H, Rose AT, Porras D, Shelton EL, Reese J, Hansmann G
(2020) Pediatrics 146:
MeSH Terms: Algorithms, Ductus Arteriosus, Patent, Humans, Infant, Newborn, Infant, Premature
Show Abstract · Added January 7, 2021
Postnatal ductal closure is stimulated by rising oxygen tension and withdrawal of vasodilatory mediators (prostaglandins, nitric oxide, adenosine) and by vasoconstrictors (endothelin-1, catecholamines, contractile prostanoids), ion channels, calcium flux, platelets, morphologic maturity, and a favorable genetic predisposition. A persistently patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in preterm infants can have clinical consequences. Decreasing pulmonary vascular resistance, especially in extremely low gestational age newborns, increases left-to-right shunting through the ductus and increases pulmonary blood flow further, leading to interstitial pulmonary edema and volume load to the left heart. Potential consequences of left-to-right shunting via a hemodynamically significant patent ductus arteriosus (hsPDA) include increased risk for prolonged ventilation, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, necrotizing enterocolitis or focal intestinal perforation, intraventricular hemorrhage, and death. In the last decade, there has been a trend toward less aggressive treatment of PDA in preterm infants. However, there is a subgroup of infants who will likely benefit from intervention, be it pharmacologic, interventional, or surgical: (1) prophylactic intravenous indomethacin in highly selected extremely low gestational age newborns with PDA (<26 + 0/7 weeks' gestation, <750 g birth weight), (2) early targeted therapy of PDA in selected preterm infants at particular high risk for PDA-associated complications, and (3) PDA ligation, catheter intervention, or oral paracetamol may be considered as rescue options for hsPDA closure. The impact of catheter-based closure of hsPDA on clinical outcomes should be determined in future prospective studies. Finally, we provide a novel treatment algorithm for PDA in preterm infants that integrates the several treatment modalities in a staged approach.
Copyright © 2020 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.
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A Murine Model of Fetal Exposure to Maternal Inflammation to Study the Effects of Acute Chorioamnionitis on Newborn Intestinal Development.
Juber BA, Elgin TG, Fricke EM, Gong H, Reese J, McElroy SJ
(2020) J Vis Exp :
MeSH Terms: Acute Disease, Animals, Chorioamnionitis, Cytokines, Disease Models, Animal, Female, Fetus, Humans, Infant, Newborn, Intestines, Mice, Mothers, Paneth Cells, Placenta, Pregnancy, Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Show Abstract · Added January 7, 2021
Chorioamnionitis is a common precipitant of preterm birth and is associated with many of the morbidities of prematurity, including necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). However, a mechanistic link between these two conditions remains yet to be discovered. We have adopted a murine model of chorioamnionitis involving lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced fetal exposure to maternal inflammation (FEMI). This model of FEMI induces a sterile maternal, placental, and fetal inflammatory cascade, which is also present in many cases of clinical chorioamnionitis. Although models exist that utilize live bacteria and more accurately mimic the pathophysiology of an ascending infection resulting in chorioamnionitis, these methods may cause indirect effects on development of the immature intestinal tract and the associated developing microbiome. Using this protocol, we have demonstrated that LPS-induced FEMI results in a dose-dependent increase in pregnancy loss and preterm birth, as well as disruption of normal intestinal development in offspring. Further, we have demonstrated that FEMI significantly increases intestinal injury and serum cytokines in offspring, while simultaneously decreasing goblet and Paneth cells, both of which provide a first line of innate immunity against intestinal inflammation. Although a similar model of LPS-induced FEMI has been used to model the association between chorioamnionitis and subsequent abnormalities of the central nervous system, to our knowledge, this protocol is the first to attempt to elucidate a mechanistic link between chorioamnionitis and later perturbations in intestinal development as a potential link between chorioamnionitis and NEC.
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rhIGF-1 Therapy: A Silver Bullet for Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia Prevention?
Plosa EJ, Benjamin JT
(2020) Am J Respir Crit Care Med 201: 1032-1033
MeSH Terms: Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia, Humans, Hypertension, Pulmonary, Infant, Newborn
Added March 18, 2020
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Case 3: Emesis in a Term Infant with Dysmorphic Features.
Richardson TL, Ransom M, Crane G, Plosa E, Sucre J
(2020) Neoreviews 21: e127-e130
MeSH Terms: Digestive System Abnormalities, Female, Humans, Infant, Newborn, Musculoskeletal Abnormalities, Vomiting
Added March 18, 2020
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6 MeSH Terms
The Incidence of Laryngotracheal Stenosis in Neonates With a History of Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia.
Lowery AS, Gelbard A, Wootten C
(2020) Laryngoscope 130: 2252-2255
MeSH Terms: Bronchoalveolar Lavage, Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid, Case-Control Studies, Female, Humans, Incidence, Infant, Newborn, Intensive Care Units, Neonatal, Laryngostenosis, Male, Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated, Retrospective Studies, Risk Factors, Tracheal Stenosis
Show Abstract · Added July 30, 2020
OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS - Neonatal patients requiring prolonged intubation are susceptible to both infection and laryngotracheal stenosis (LTS). This study investigated the effect of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) on the development of LTS in neonates.
STUDY DESIGN - Retrospective case-control study.
METHODS - The incidence of LTS in neonates with VAP was compared with the incidence of LTS in matched intubated controls without VAP. Patients were treated at a tertiary-care medical center from 2004 to 2014. Eligible patient records were assessed for the development of LTS. Demographics, medical comorbidities, infection characteristics, and treatment variables were compared using unpaired t test or χ test. Statistical significance was set a priori at P < .05.
RESULTS - When comparing the VAP patients with matched non-VAP controls, we found no significant differences in the incidence of LTS (VAP vs. non-VAP, 8.3% vs. 6.7%; P = .73). In subgroup analysis of the VAP cohort, LTS and non-LTS patients demonstrated similar VAP organisms on broncho-alveolar lavage (Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeroginosa, Escherichia coli, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Enterobacter). Additionally, within the VAP cohort, LTS and non-LTS patients showed similar gestational age (LTS vs. non-LTS, 31.3 days vs. 28.1 days; P = .22), birth weight (LTS vs. non-LTS, 1.6 kg vs. 1.2 kg; P = .33), and similar intubation duration (LTS vs. non-LTS, 37.8 days vs. 27.5 days; P = .52).
CONCLUSIONS - In this neonatal cohort, VAP was not associated with an increased incidence of LTS. Given severity of the burden of LTS on the healthcare system, multi-institutional longitudinal investigation into contributing risk factors for neonatal LTS is warranted.
LEVEL OF EVIDENCE - NA Laryngoscope, 130:2252-2255, 2020.
© 2019 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.
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14 MeSH Terms
Pharmacological closure of the patent ductus arteriosus: when treatment still makes sense.
Gillam-Krakauer M, Hagadorn JI, Reese J
(2019) J Perinatol 39: 1439-1441
MeSH Terms: Acetaminophen, Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors, Decision Making, Ductus Arteriosus, Patent, Humans, Indomethacin, Infant, Infant, Low Birth Weight, Infant, Newborn, Infant, Premature
Added July 28, 2020
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is associated with indomethacin treatment failure for patent ductus arteriosus.
Rooney SR, Shelton EL, Aka I, Shaffer CM, Clyman RI, Dagle JM, Ryckman K, Lewis TR, Reese J, Van Driest SL, Kannankeril PJ
(2019) Pharmacogenomics 20: 939-946
MeSH Terms: Cohort Studies, Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors, Cytochrome P-450 CYP2C9, Ductus Arteriosus, Patent, Female, Gestational Age, Humans, Indomethacin, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Infant, Premature, Male, Treatment Failure, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added July 28, 2020
To identify clinical andgenetic factors associated with indomethacin treatment failure in preterm neonates with patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). This is a multicenter cohort study of 144 preterm infants (22-32 weeks gestational age) at three centers who received at least one treatment course of indomethacin for PDA. Indomethacin failure was defined as requiring subsequent surgical intervention. In multivariate analysis, gestational age (AOR 0.76, 95% CI 0.60-0.96), surfactant use (AOR 9.77, 95% CI 1.15-83.26), and (AOR 3.74; 95% CI 1.34-10.44) were each associated with indomethacin failure. Age, surfactant use, and influence indomethacin treatment outcome in preterm infants with PDA. This combination of clinical and genetic factors may facilitate targeted indomethacin use for PDA.
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Genetic Mosaicism in Calmodulinopathy.
Wren LM, Jiménez-Jáimez J, Al-Ghamdi S, Al-Aama JY, Bdeir A, Al-Hassnan ZN, Kuan JL, Foo RY, Potet F, Johnson CN, Aziz MC, Carvill GL, Kaski JP, Crotti L, Perin F, Monserrat L, Burridge PW, Schwartz PJ, Chazin WJ, Bhuiyan ZA, George AL
(2019) Circ Genom Precis Med 12: 375-385
MeSH Terms: Arrhythmias, Cardiac, Base Sequence, Calcium, Calmodulin, Child, Preschool, Electrophysiology, Female, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Humans, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Male, Mosaicism, Mutation, Missense, Pedigree
Show Abstract · Added March 11, 2020
BACKGROUND - CaM (calmodulin) mutations are associated with congenital arrhythmia susceptibility (calmodulinopathy) and are most often de novo. In this report, we sought to broaden the genotype-phenotype spectrum of calmodulinopathies with 2 novel calmodulin mutations and to investigate mosaicism in 2 affected families.
METHODS - CaM mutations were identified in 4 independent cases by DNA sequencing. Biochemical and electrophysiological studies were performed to determine functional consequences of each mutation.
RESULTS - Genetic studies identified 2 novel CaM variants (-E141K in 2 cases; -E141V) and one previously reported CaM pathogenic variant (-D130G) among 4 probands with shared clinical features of prolonged QTc interval (range 505-725 ms) and documented ventricular arrhythmia. A fatal outcome occurred for 2 of the cases. The parents of all probands were asymptomatic with normal QTc duration. However, 2 of the families had multiple affected offspring or multiple occurrences of intrauterine fetal demise. The mother from the family with recurrent intrauterine fetal demise exhibited the -E141K mutant allele in 25% of next-generation sequencing reads indicating somatic mosaicism, whereas -D130G was present in 6% of captured molecules of the paternal DNA sample, also indicating mosaicism. Two novel mutations (E141K and E141V) impaired Ca binding affinity to the C-domain of CaM. Human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes overexpressing mutant or wild-type CaM showed that both mutants impaired Ca-dependent inactivation of L-type Ca channels and prolonged action potential duration.
CONCLUSIONS - We report 2 families with somatic mosaicism associated with arrhythmogenic calmodulinopathy, and demonstrate dysregulation of L-type Ca channels by 2 novel CaM mutations affecting the same residue. Parental mosaicism should be suspected in families with unexplained fetal arrhythmia or fetal demise combined with a documented CaM mutation.
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Friend or Foe in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Pathogenesis: Not All Infections Are Equal.
Shah SC
(2019) Gastroenterology 157: 1441-1442
MeSH Terms: Affect, Humans, Infant, Newborn, Infections, Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, Life
Added March 3, 2020
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Arterial Ischemic Stroke Secondary to Cardiac Disease in Neonates and Children.
Chung MG, Guilliams KP, Wilson JL, Beslow LA, Dowling MM, Friedman NR, Hassanein SMA, Ichord R, Jordan LC, Mackay MT, Rafay MF, Rivkin M, Torres M, Zafeiriou D, deVeber G, Fox CK, International Pediatric Stroke Study Investigators
(2019) Pediatr Neurol 100: 35-41
MeSH Terms: Brain Ischemia, Cardiac Surgical Procedures, Child, Child, Preschool, Female, Heart Diseases, Humans, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Infant, Newborn, Diseases, Intracranial Arterial Diseases, Intraoperative Complications, Male, Postoperative Complications, Registries, Stroke, Thromboembolism
Show Abstract · Added March 24, 2020
OBJECTIVE - We describe the risk factors for peri-procedural and spontaneous arterial ischemic stroke (AIS) in children with cardiac disease.
METHODS - We identified children with cardiac causes of AIS enrolled in the International Pediatric Stroke Study registry from January 2003 to July 2014. Isolated patent foramen ovale was excluded. Peri-procedural AIS (those occurring during or within 72 hours of cardiac surgery, cardiac catheterization, or mechanical circulatory support) and spontaneous AIS that occurred outside of these time periods were compared.
RESULTS - We identified 672 patients with congenital or acquired cardiac disease as the primary risk factor for AIS. Among these, 177 patients (26%) had peri-procedural AIS and 495 patients (74%) had spontaneous AIS. Among non-neonates, spontaneous AIS occurred at older ages (median 4.2 years, interquartile range 0.97 to 12.4) compared with peri-procedural AIS (median 2.4 years, interquartile range 0.35 to 6.1, P < 0.001). About a third of patients in both groups had a systemic illness at the time of AIS. Patients who had spontaneous AIS were more likely to have a preceding thrombotic event (16 % versus 9 %, P = 0.02) and to have a moderate or severe neurological deficit at discharge (67% versus 33%, P = 0.01) compared to those with peri-procedural AIS.
CONCLUSIONS - Children with cardiac disease are at risk for AIS at the time of cardiac procedures but also outside of the immediate 72 hours after procedures. Many have acute systemic illness or thrombotic event preceding AIS, suggesting that inflammatory or prothrombotic conditions could act as a stroke trigger in this susceptible population.
Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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17 MeSH Terms