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Venous Thromboembolism during Interventional MRI-Guided Stereotactic Surgery.
Kundishora AJ, Englot DJ, Starr PA, Martin AJ, Larson PS
(2018) Stereotact Funct Neurosurg 96: 40-45
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Child, Female, Humans, Imaging, Three-Dimensional, Intraoperative Complications, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Interventional, Male, Middle Aged, Retrospective Studies, Risk Factors, Stereotaxic Techniques, Venous Thromboembolism, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added September 25, 2018
BACKGROUND/AIMS - Interventional MRI (iMRI) allows real-time confirmation of electrode and microcatheter location in anesthetized patients; however, MRI-compatible pneumatic compression devices (PCD) to reduce the periprocedural venous thromboembolism (VTE) risk are not commercially available. Given the paucity of literature on VTE following iMRI surgery, better characterizing patients suffering this complication and the incidence of this event following iMRI procedures is pivotal for defining best surgical practices. We aim to investigate the incidence of postoperative VTE in iMRI procedures without the use of PCD.
METHODS - Medical records and operative times of patients were retrospectively reviewed. Patient demographics and mean surgical durations were reported with statistical comparisons via ANOVA and the 2-tailed Student t test, an α of 0.05, and the Bonferroni correction. Patients experiencing postoperative VTE underwent an in-depth chart review.
RESULTS - Two out of two hundred ten (0.95%) iMRI procedures resulted in postoperative VTE events. There were statistically significant differences in procedure times between unilateral electrode (157.5 ± 5.7 min), bilateral electrode (193.6 ± 2.9 min), and bilateral gene therapy procedures (467.3 ± 26.5 min). Both patients had longer-than-average operative times for their respective procedures.
CONCLUSIONS - The incidence of postoperative VTE is low following iMRI procedures, even without the use of PCD during surgery.
© 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.
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16 MeSH Terms
A modern epilepsy surgery treatment algorithm: Incorporating traditional and emerging technologies.
Englot DJ
(2018) Epilepsy Behav 80: 68-74
MeSH Terms: Algorithms, Drug Resistant Epilepsy, Electroencephalography, Epilepsy, Epilepsy, Generalized, Humans, Imaging, Three-Dimensional, Minimally Invasive Surgical Procedures, Quality of Life, Radiosurgery, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added September 25, 2018
Epilepsy surgery has seen numerous technological advances in both diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in recent years. This has increased the number of patients who may be candidates for intervention and potential improvement in quality of life. However, the expansion of the field also necessitates a broader understanding of how to incorporate both traditional and emerging technologies into the care provided at comprehensive epilepsy centers. This review summarizes both old and new surgical procedures in epilepsy using an example algorithm. While treatment algorithms are inherently oversimplified, incomplete, and reflect personal bias, they provide a general framework that can be customized to each center and each patient, incorporating differences in provider opinion, patient preference, and the institutional availability of technologies. For instance, the use of minimally invasive stereotactic electroencephalography (SEEG) has increased dramatically over the past decade, but many cases still benefit from invasive recordings using subdural grids. Furthermore, although surgical resection remains the gold-standard treatment for focal mesial temporal or neocortical epilepsy, ablative procedures such as laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) may be appropriate and avoid craniotomy in many cases. Furthermore, while palliative surgical procedures were once limited to disconnection surgeries, several neurostimulation treatments are now available to treat eloquent cortical, bitemporal, and even multifocal or generalized epilepsy syndromes. An updated perspective in epilepsy surgery will help guide surgical decision making and lay the groundwork for data collection needed in future studies and trials.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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11 MeSH Terms
Histological validation of diffusion MRI fiber orientation distributions and dispersion.
Schilling KG, Janve V, Gao Y, Stepniewska I, Landman BA, Anderson AW
(2018) Neuroimage 165: 200-221
MeSH Terms: Animals, Brain, Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Diffusion Tensor Imaging, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, Imaging, Three-Dimensional, Nerve Fibers, Neuroimaging, Saimiri
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) is widely used to probe tissue microstructure, and is currently the only non-invasive way to measure the brain's fiber architecture. While a large number of approaches to recover the intra-voxel fiber structure have been utilized in the scientific community, a direct, 3D, quantitative validation of these methods against relevant histological fiber geometries is lacking. In this study, we investigate how well different high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) models and reconstruction methods predict the ground-truth histologically defined fiber orientation distribution (FOD), as well as investigate their behavior over a range of physical and experimental conditions. The dMRI methods tested include constrained spherical deconvolution (CSD), Q-ball imaging (QBI), diffusion orientation transform (DOT), persistent angular structure (PAS), and neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging (NODDI) methods. Evaluation criteria focus on overall agreement in FOD shape, correct assessment of the number of fiber populations, and angular accuracy in orientation. In addition, we make comparisons of the histological orientation dispersion with the fiber spread determined from the dMRI methods. As a general result, no HARDI method outperformed others in all quality criteria, with many showing tradeoffs in reconstruction accuracy. All reconstruction techniques describe the overall continuous angular structure of the histological FOD quite well, with good to moderate correlation (median angular correlation coefficient > 0.70) in both single- and multiple-fiber voxels. However, no method is consistently successful at extracting discrete measures of the number and orientations of FOD peaks. The major inaccuracies of all techniques tend to be in extracting local maxima of the FOD, resulting in either false positive or false negative peaks. Median angular errors are ∼10° for the primary fiber direction and ∼20° for the secondary fiber, if present. For most methods, these results did not vary strongly over a wide range of acquisition parameters (number of diffusion weighting directions and b value). Regardless of acquisition parameters, all methods show improved successes at resolving multiple fiber compartments in a voxel when fiber populations cross at near-orthogonal angles, with no method adequately capturing low to moderate angle (<60°) crossing fibers. Finally, most methods are limited in their ability to capture orientation dispersion, resulting in low to moderate, yet statistically significant, correlation with histologically-derived dispersion with both HARDI and NODDI methodologies. Together, these results provide quantitative measures of the reliability and limitations of dMRI reconstruction methods and can be used to identify relative advantages of competing approaches as well as potential strategies for improving accuracy.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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The C-terminal region of A-kinase anchor protein 350 (AKAP350A) enables formation of microtubule-nucleation centers and interacts with pericentriolar proteins.
Kolobova E, Roland JT, Lapierre LA, Williams JA, Mason TA, Goldenring JR
(2017) J Biol Chem 292: 20394-20409
MeSH Terms: A Kinase Anchor Proteins, Biomarkers, Cell Line, Centrosome, Cytoskeletal Proteins, Humans, Imaging, Three-Dimensional, Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins, Luminescent Proteins, Microscopy, Electron, Transmission, Microtubule-Associated Proteins, Microtubule-Organizing Center, Models, Molecular, Nerve Tissue Proteins, Peptide Fragments, Phosphoproteins, Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs, Protein Interaction Mapping, Protein Multimerization, Proteomics, RNA Interference, Recombinant Fusion Proteins, Recombinant Proteins, Two-Hybrid System Techniques
Show Abstract · Added April 3, 2018
Microtubules in animal cells assemble (nucleate) from both the centrosome and the cis-Golgi cisternae. A-kinase anchor protein 350 kDa (AKAP350A, also called AKAP450/CG-NAP/AKAP9) is a large scaffolding protein located at both the centrosome and Golgi apparatus. Previous findings have suggested that AKAP350 is important for microtubule dynamics at both locations, but how this scaffolding protein assembles microtubule nucleation machinery is unclear. Here, we found that overexpression of the C-terminal third of AKAP350A, enhanced GFP-AKAP350A(2691-3907), induces the formation of multiple microtubule-nucleation centers (MTNCs). Nevertheless, these induced MTNCs lacked "true" centriole proteins, such as Cep135. Mapping analysis with AKAP350A truncations demonstrated that AKAP350A contains discrete regions responsible for promoting or inhibiting the formation of multiple MTNCs. Moreover, GFP-AKAP350A(2691-3907) recruited several pericentriolar proteins to MTNCs, including γ-tubulin, pericentrin, Cep68, Cep170, and Cdk5RAP2. Proteomic analysis indicated that Cdk5RAP2 and Cep170 both interact with the microtubule nucleation-promoting region of AKAP350A, whereas Cep68 interacts with the distal C-terminal AKAP350A region. Yeast two-hybrid assays established a direct interaction of Cep170 with AKAP350A. Super-resolution and deconvolution microscopy analyses were performed to define the association of AKAP350A with centrosomes, and these studies disclosed that AKAP350A spans the bridge between centrioles, co-localizing with rootletin and Cep68 in the linker region. siRNA-mediated depletion of AKAP350A caused displacement of both Cep68 and Cep170 from the centrosome. These results suggest that AKAP350A acts as a scaffold for factors involved in microtubule nucleation at the centrosome and coordinates the assembly of protein complexes associating with the intercentriolar bridge.
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Pathways to clinical CLARITY: volumetric analysis of irregular, soft, and heterogeneous tissues in development and disease.
Hsueh B, Burns VM, Pauerstein P, Holzem K, Ye L, Engberg K, Wang AC, Gu X, Chakravarthy H, Arda HE, Charville G, Vogel H, Efimov IR, Kim S, Deisseroth K
(2017) Sci Rep 7: 5899
MeSH Terms: Animals, Disease, Female, Humans, Hydrogels, Imaging, Three-Dimensional, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Neural Crest, Neurosecretory Systems, Organogenesis, Pancreas
Show Abstract · Added October 31, 2017
Three-dimensional tissue-structural relationships are not well captured by typical thin-section histology, posing challenges for the study of tissue physiology and pathology. Moreover, while recent progress has been made with intact methods for clearing, labeling, and imaging whole organs such as the mature brain, these approaches are generally unsuitable for soft, irregular, and heterogeneous tissues that account for the vast majority of clinical samples and biopsies. Here we develop a biphasic hydrogel methodology, which along with automated analysis, provides for high-throughput quantitative volumetric interrogation of spatially-irregular and friable tissue structures. We validate and apply this approach in the examination of a variety of developing and diseased tissues, with specific focus on the dynamics of normal and pathological pancreatic innervation and development, including in clinical samples. Quantitative advantages of the intact-tissue approach were demonstrated compared to conventional thin-section histology, pointing to broad applications in both research and clinical settings.
1 Communities
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11 MeSH Terms
Deformation correction for image guided liver surgery: An intraoperative fidelity assessment.
Clements LW, Collins JA, Weis JA, Simpson AL, Kingham TP, Jarnagin WR, Miga MI
(2017) Surgery 162: 537-547
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Hepatectomy, Humans, Imaging, Three-Dimensional, Liver, Liver Neoplasms, Male, Middle Aged, Monitoring, Intraoperative, Outcome Assessment (Health Care), Single-Blind Method, Statistics, Nonparametric, Surgery, Computer-Assisted, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added July 23, 2018
BACKGROUND - Although systems of 3-dimensional image-guided surgery are a valuable adjunct across numerous procedures, differences in organ shape between that reflected in the preoperative image data and the intraoperative state can compromise the fidelity of such guidance based on the image. In this work, we assessed in real time a novel, 3-dimensional image-guided operation platform that incorporates soft tissue deformation.
METHODS - A series of 125 alignment evaluations were performed across 20 patients. During the operation, the surgeon assessed the liver by swabbing an optically tracked stylus over the liver surface and viewing the image-guided operation display. Each patient had approximately 6 intraoperative comparative evaluations. For each assessment, 1 of only 2 types of alignments were considered: conventional rigid and novel deformable. The series of alignment types used was randomized and blinded to the surgeon. The surgeon provided a rating, R, from -3 to +3 for each display compared with the previous display, whereby a negative rating indicated degradation in fidelity and a positive rating an improvement.
RESULTS - A statistical analysis of the series of rating data by the clinician indicated that the surgeons were able to perceive an improvement (defined as a R > 1) of the model-based registration over the rigid registration (P = .01) as well as a degradation (defined as R < -1) when the rigid registration was compared with the novel deformable guidance information (P = .03).
CONCLUSION - This study provides evidence of the benefit of deformation correction in providing an accurate location for the liver for use in image-guided surgery systems.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Retrospective Evaluation of a Technique for Patient-Customized Placement of Precurved Cochlear Implant Electrode Arrays.
Wang J, Dawant BM, Labadie RF, Noble JH
(2017) Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 157: 107-112
MeSH Terms: Cochlear Implantation, Cochlear Implants, Electrodes, Implanted, Female, Humans, Imaging, Three-Dimensional, Male, Prosthesis Design, Retrospective Studies, Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2018
Objective Precurved electrode arrays (EAs) are commonly used in cochlear implants (CIs). Modiolar placement of such arrays has been shown to lead to better hearing outcomes. In this project, we retrospectively evaluated the modiolar positioning of EAs within a large CI imaging database. We aimed to discover the rate at which perimodiolar placement is successfully achieved and to evaluate a new technique we propose to preoperatively plan patient-customized EA insertion depths to improve perimodiolar placement at the time of surgery. Study Design Retrospective chart review and radiographic analysis. Setting Single tertiary academic referral center. Subjects and Methods Ninety-seven CI ears were evaluated. Perimodiolar positioning of electrodes was quantified using pre- and postimplantation computed tomography scans and automated image analysis techniques. Results Average perimodiolar distance was 0.59 ± 0.18 mm. Disagreement between the actual and our recommended insertion depth was found to be positively correlated with perimodiolar distance ( r = 0.49, P < .0001). Conclusions These results show that the average CI recipient with a precurved EA has a number of electrodes distant to the modiolus where they are not most effective. Our results also indicate the approach we propose for selecting patient-customized EA insertion depth would lead to better perimodiolar placement of precurved EAs.
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Connecting imaging mass spectrometry and magnetic resonance imaging-based anatomical atlases for automated anatomical interpretation and differential analysis.
Verbeeck N, Spraggins JM, Murphy MJM, Wang HD, Deutch AY, Caprioli RM, Van de Plas R
(2017) Biochim Biophys Acta Proteins Proteom 1865: 967-977
MeSH Terms: Animals, Brain, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, Imaging, Three-Dimensional, Ions, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Mass Spectrometry, Mice, Parkinson Disease, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Show Abstract · Added April 6, 2017
Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is a molecular imaging technology that can measure thousands of biomolecules concurrently without prior tagging, making it particularly suitable for exploratory research. However, the data size and dimensionality often makes thorough extraction of relevant information impractical. To help guide and accelerate IMS data analysis, we recently developed a framework that integrates IMS measurements with anatomical atlases, opening up opportunities for anatomy-driven exploration of IMS data. One example is the automated anatomical interpretation of ion images, where empirically measured ion distributions are automatically decomposed into their underlying anatomical structures. While offering significant potential, IMS-atlas integration has thus far been restricted to the Allen Mouse Brain Atlas (AMBA) and mouse brain samples. Here, we expand the applicability of this framework by extending towards new animal species and a new set of anatomical atlases retrieved from the Scalable Brain Atlas (SBA). Furthermore, as many SBA atlases are based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data, a new registration pipeline was developed that enables direct non-rigid IMS-to-MRI registration. These developments are demonstrated on protein-focused FTICR IMS measurements from coronal brain sections of a Parkinson's disease (PD) rat model. The measurements are integrated with an MRI-based rat brain atlas from the SBA. The new rat-focused IMS-atlas integration is used to perform automated anatomical interpretation and to find differential ions between healthy and diseased tissue. IMS-atlas integration can serve as an important accelerator in IMS data exploration, and with these new developments it can now be applied to a wider variety of animal species and modalities. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: MALDI Imaging, edited by Dr. Corinna Henkel and Prof. Peter Hoffmann.
Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.
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12 MeSH Terms
Focused stimulation of dorsal subthalamic nucleus improves reactive inhibitory control of action impulses.
van Wouwe NC, Pallavaram S, Phibbs FT, Martinez-Ramirez D, Neimat JS, Dawant BM, D'Haese PF, Kanoff KE, van den Wildenberg WPM, Okun MS, Wylie SA
(2017) Neuropsychologia 99: 37-47
MeSH Terms: Antiparkinson Agents, Deep Brain Stimulation, Dopamine Agents, Female, Humans, Imaging, Three-Dimensional, Inhibition (Psychology), Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Motor Activity, Neuropsychological Tests, Parkinson Disease, Reaction Time, Subthalamic Nucleus
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2018
Frontal-basal ganglia circuitry dysfunction caused by Parkinson's disease impairs important executive cognitive processes, such as the ability to inhibit impulsive action tendencies. Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation in Parkinson's disease improves the reactive inhibition of impulsive actions that interfere with goal-directed behavior. An unresolved question is whether this effect depends on stimulation of a particular Subthalamic Nucleus subregion. The current study aimed to 1) replicate previous findings and additionally investigate the effect of chronic versus acute Subthalamic Nucleus stimulation on inhibitory control in Parkinson's disease patients off dopaminergic medication 2) test whether stimulating Subthalamic Nucleus subregions differentially modulate proactive response control and the proficiency of reactive inhibitory control. In the first experiment, twelve Parkinson's disease patients completed three sessions of the Simon task, Off Deep brain stimulation and medication, on acute Deep Brain Stimulation and on chronic Deep Brain Stimulation. Experiment 2 consisted of 11 Parkinson's disease patients with Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation (off medication) who completed two testing sessions involving of a Simon task either with stimulation of the dorsal or the ventral contact in the Subthalamic Nucleus. Our findings show that Deep Brain Stimulation improves reactive inhibitory control, regardless of medication and regardless of whether it concerns chronic or acute Subthalamic Nucleus stimulation. More importantly, selective stimulation of dorsal and ventral subregions of the Subthalamic Nucleus indicates that especially the dorsal Subthalamic Nucleus circuitries are crucial for modulating the reactive inhibitory control of motor actions.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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Regionally Discrete Aqueous Humor Outflow Quantification Using Fluorescein Canalograms.
Loewen RT, Brown EN, Roy P, Schuman JS, Sigal IA, Loewen NA
(2016) PLoS One 11: e0151754
MeSH Terms: Animals, Anterior Chamber, Aqueous Humor, Fluorescein, Imaging, Three-Dimensional, Ophthalmology, Sus scrofa, Time-Lapse Imaging
Show Abstract · Added August 31, 2017
PURPOSE - To visualize and quantify conventional outflow directly in its anatomic location.
METHODS - We obtained fluorescein canalograms in six porcine whole eyes and six porcine anterior segment cultures. Eyes were perfused with a constant pressure of 15 mmHg using media containing 0.017 mg/ml fluorescein. Flow patterns were visualized using a stereo dissecting microscope equipped for fluorescent imaging. Images were captured every 30 seconds for 20 minutes for time lapse analysis. Anterior chamber cultures were imaged again on day three of culture. Canalograms were first analyzed for filling time per quadrant. We then wrote a program to automatically compute focal flow fits for each macropixel and to detect convergent perilimbal flow patterns with macropixels grouped into 3 equal-radial width rings around the cornea. A generalized additive model was used to determine fluorescence changes of individual macropixels.
RESULTS - The resulting imaging algorithm deployed 1024 macropixels that were fit to determine maximum intensity and time to fill. These individual fits highlighted the focal flow function. In whole eyes, significantly faster flow was seen in the inferonasal (IN) and superonasal (SN) quadrants compared to the superotemporal (ST) and inferotemporal (IT) ones (p<0.05). In anterior chamber cultures, reduced flow on day 1 increased in all quadrants on day 3 except in IT (p<0.05). Perilimbal ring analysis uncovered convergent perilimbal flow.
CONCLUSIONS - An algorithm was developed that analyzes regional and circumferential outflow patterns. This algorithm found flow patterns that changed over time and differ in whole eyes and anterior segment cultures.
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8 MeSH Terms