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Inhibition of local immune responses by the frog-killing fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis.
Fites JS, Reinert LK, Chappell TM, Rollins-Smith LA
(2014) Infect Immun 82: 4698-706
MeSH Terms: Adaptive Immunity, Animals, Chytridiomycota, Dermatomycoses, Female, Hypersensitivity, Delayed, Immunity, Innate, Phytohemagglutinins, Xenopus laevis
Show Abstract · Added February 12, 2015
Amphibians are suffering unprecedented global declines. A leading cause is the infectious disease chytridiomycosis caused by the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis. Chytridiomycosis is a skin disease which disrupts transport of essential ions leading to death. Soluble factors produced by B. dendrobatidis impair amphibian and mammalian lymphocytes in vitro, but previous studies have not shown the effects of these inhibitory factors in vivo. To demonstrate in vivo inhibition of immunity by B. dendrobatidis, a modified delayed-type-hypersensitivity (DTH) protocol was developed to induce innate and adaptive inflammatory swelling in the feet of Xenopus laevis by injection of killed bacteria or phytohemagglutinin (PHA). Compared to previous protocols for PHA injection in amphibians, this method induced up to 20-fold greater inflammatory swelling. Using this new protocol, we measured DTH responses induced by killed bacteria or PHA in the presence of B. dendrobatidis supernatants. Swelling induced by single injection of PHA or killed bacteria was not significantly affected by B. dendrobatidis supernatants. However, swelling caused by a secondary injection of PHA, was significantly reduced by B. dendrobatidis supernatants. As previously described in vitro, factors from B. dendrobatidis appear to inhibit lymphocyte-mediated inflammatory swelling but not swelling caused by an inducer of innate leukocytes. This suggests that B. dendrobatidis is capable of inhibiting lymphocytes in a localized response to prevent adaptive immune responses in the skin. The modified protocol used to induce inflammatory swelling in the present study may be more effective than previous methods to investigate amphibian immune competence, particularly in nonmodel species.
Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.
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9 MeSH Terms
Induction of specific T cell immunity in patients with prostate cancer by vaccination with PSA146-154 peptide.
Perambakam S, Hallmeyer S, Reddy S, Mahmud N, Bressler L, DeChristopher P, Mahmud D, Nunez R, Sosman JA, Peace DJ
(2006) Cancer Immunol Immunother 55: 1033-42
MeSH Terms: Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Amino Acid Sequence, Cancer Vaccines, Dendritic Cells, Epitopes, Humans, Hypersensitivity, Delayed, Immunity, Cellular, Immunotherapy, Active, Male, Middle Aged, Molecular Sequence Data, Peptide Fragments, Peptides, Prostate-Specific Antigen, Prostatic Neoplasms, T-Lymphocyte Subsets, T-Lymphocytes, Cytotoxic, Transplantation, Autologous
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
T cell immunotherapy of prostate cancer (CaP) offers the potential for less toxic, more effective outcomes. A clinical trial was conducted in 28 patients with locally advanced or metastatic CaP to determine whether an HLA-A2 binding epitope of prostate-specific antigen, PSA146-154 (PSA-peptide), can induce specific T cell immunity. Patients were vaccinated either by intradermal injection of PSA-peptide and GM-CSF or by intravenous administration of autologous dendritic cells pulsed with PSA-peptide at weeks 1, 4 and 10. Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin testing was performed at weeks 4, 14, 26 and 52. Fifty percent of the patients developed positive DTH responses to PSA-peptide. The size of the DTH induration progressively increased over time in the majority of responding patients. Skin biopsies from seven DTH-positive patients were available and T cells that developed in situ were also characterized. The phenotype of recovered T cells demonstrated variable proportions of CD4+CD8-, CD4-CD8+ and CD4+CD8+ T cell populations. Cytokine analysis of PSA-peptide stimulated T cells per bead array assay exhibited specific IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha response in six of seven patients. Specific IL-4 response was observed in five patients, while IL-10 response was detected in one patient. Purified CD4-CD8+ T cells isolated from four patients demonstrated specific cytolytic activity per chromium release assay. In conclusion, immunization with PSA-peptide induced specific T cell immunity in one-half of the patients with locally advanced and hormone-sensitive, metastatic CaP. DTH-derived T cells exhibited PSA-peptide-specific cytolytic activity and predominantly expressed a type-1 cytokine profile.
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20 MeSH Terms
Experimental autoimmune anti-glomerular basement membrane glomerulonephritis: a protective role for IFN-gamma.
Kitching AR, Turner AL, Semple T, Li M, Edgtton KL, Wilson GR, Timoshanko JR, Hudson BG, Holdsworth SR
(2004) J Am Soc Nephrol 15: 1764-74
MeSH Terms: Animals, Anti-Glomerular Basement Membrane Disease, Apoptosis, Autoimmune Diseases, CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes, Cell Adhesion, Cell Division, Creatinine, Dimerization, Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay, Glomerulonephritis, Hypersensitivity, Delayed, Immunoglobulin G, Immunohistochemistry, Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1, Interferon-gamma, Interleukin-12, Leukocytes, Lupus Vulgaris, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Transgenic, Microscopy, Fluorescence, P-Selectin, Proteinuria, Time Factors
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
IL-12 and IFN-gamma play key roles in murine lupus and planted antigen models of glomerulonephritis. However, their roles in renal organ-specific autoimmunity are unknown. To establish the roles of endogenous IFN-gamma and IL-12 in experimental autoimmune anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) glomerulonephritis (EAG), EAG was induced in normal C57BL/6 mice (WT), IL-12p40-deficient (IL-12p40-/-) mice, and IFN-gamma-deficient (IFN-gamma-/-) mice by immunization with alpha3-alpha5(IV)NC1 heterodimers. At 13 wk, WT mice developed EAG with linear mouse anti-GBM antibody deposition, histologic injury, proteinuria, and mild tubulointerstitial disease. Compared with WT mice, IL-12p40-/- mice had decreased histologic injury and trends to decreased leukocyte infiltrates. In contrast, 40% (4 of 10) of IFN-gamma-/- mice developed significant crescent formation and focal or diffuse interstitial infiltrates (WT, 0 of 8). Compared with WT and/or IL-12p40-/- mice, IFN-gamma-/- mice developed increased injury: histologic injury, total glomerular cell numbers, leukocytes in glomeruli, and renal expression of P-selectin and intercellular adhesion molecule 1. All groups developed similar serum anti-alpha3-alpha5(IV)NC1 antibodies and glomerular Ig deposition, but IFN-gamma-/- mice had decreased anti-alpha3-alpha5(IV)NC1 IgG2a. Therefore, IFN-gamma-/- mice developed increased cellular reactants despite a potentially less damaging antibody response. Dermal delayed-type hypersensitivity was increased in alpha3-alpha5(IV)NC1 immunized IFN-gamma-/- mice and was suppressed by recombinant murine IFN-gamma. CD4+ cells from draining nodes of immunized IFN-gamma-/- mice showed increased proportions of proliferating CD4+ cells but similar numbers of apoptotic cells. These studies demonstrate that in renal organ-specific autoimmunity, IL-12 is pathogenetic but IFN-gamma is protective. They lend weight to the hypothesis that depending on the context/severity of the nephritogenic immune response IFN-gamma has different effects.
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26 MeSH Terms
The case against anergy testing as a routine adjunct to tuberculin skin testing.
Slovis BS, Plitman JD, Haas DW
(2000) JAMA 283: 2003-7
MeSH Terms: Antigens, Bacterial, HIV Infections, Humans, Hypersensitivity, Delayed, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Tuberculin, Tuberculin Test, Tuberculosis
Show Abstract · Added March 13, 2015
Although anergy testing is commonly used to help interpret negative tuberculin skin test results, the validity of this approach has not been demonstrated. Specific issues include lack of a standardized protocol for antigen selection, number needed to reliably evaluate inability to respond, and uniform criteria for defining cutaneous reactivity, as well as regional variation in skin test reactivity. Tuberculin skin testing is used to screen for latent infection and to evaluate the need for isoniazid prophylaxis. The presence or absence of reactivity to control antigens does not affect this decision. The results of anergy testing also do not predict the risk for progression to active disease in either HIV-negative or HIV-positive patients. In HIV-negative patients with active tuberculosis, 10% to 20% have negative tuberculin test results, and 5% to 10% have a negative tuberculin result but have a positive reaction to another antigen. A negative tuberculin skin test result does not exclude either latent infection or active disease, even in the presence of a reaction to other antigens. Neither anergy testing nor tuberculin testing obviates the need for microbiologic evaluation when there is suspicion for active tuberculosis infection. Therefore, anergy testing is not useful in screening for asymptomatic tuberculous infection or for diagnosing active tuberculosis.
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8 MeSH Terms
Immune privilege: keeping an eye on natural killer T cells.
Hong S, Van Kaer L
(1999) J Exp Med 190: 1197-200
MeSH Terms: Animals, Anterior Chamber, Antigen-Presenting Cells, Antigens, CD1, Antigens, CD1d, CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes, Eye, Hypersensitivity, Delayed, Immune Tolerance, Killer Cells, Natural, Lymphocyte Activation, Mice, Rats, Transforming Growth Factor beta, Transplantation Immunology
Added December 10, 2013
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15 MeSH Terms
Preferential role for NF-kappa B/Rel signaling in the type 1 but not type 2 T cell-dependent immune response in vivo.
Aronica MA, Mora AL, Mitchell DB, Finn PW, Johnson JE, Sheller JR, Boothby MR
(1999) J Immunol 163: 5116-24
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bronchial Hyperreactivity, Cell Movement, Cytokines, DNA-Binding Proteins, Eosinophilia, Hypersensitivity, Delayed, I-kappa B Proteins, Immunoglobulin Isotypes, Lung, Mice, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Inbred DBA, Mice, Transgenic, NF-KappaB Inhibitor alpha, NF-kappa B, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-rel, Respiratory Hypersensitivity, Th1 Cells, Th2 Cells, Transcription Factor RelA
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
T cell function is a critical determinant of immune responses as well as susceptibility to allergic diseases. Activated T cells can differentiate into effectors whose cytokine profile is limited to type 1 (IFN-gamma-dominant) or type 2 (IL-4-, IL-5-dominant) patterns. To investigate mechanisms that connect extracellular stimuli with the regulation of effector T cell function, we have measured immune responses of transgenic mice whose NF-kappa B/Rel signaling pathway is inhibited in T cells. Surprisingly, these mice developed type 2 T cell-dependent responses (IgE and eosinophil recruitment) in a model of allergic pulmonary inflammation. In contrast, type 1 T cell responses were severely impaired, as evidenced by markedly diminished delayed-type hypersensitivity responses, IFN-gamma production, and Ag-specific IgG2a levels. Taken together, these data indicate that inhibition of NF-kappa B can lead to preferential impairment of type 1 as compared with type 2 T cell-dependent responses.
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22 MeSH Terms
Cellular cancer vaccine induces delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction and augments antibody response to tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens (sialyl Le(a), sialyl Le(x), GD3 and GM2) better than soluble lysate cancer vaccine.
Ravindranath MH, Bauer PM, Amiri AA, Miri SM, Kelley MC, Jones RC, Morton DL
(1997) Anticancer Drugs 8: 217-24
MeSH Terms: Adjuvants, Immunologic, Animals, Antibodies, Monoclonal, Antibodies, Neoplasm, Antigens, Surface, Antigens, Tumor-Associated, Carbohydrate, BCG Vaccine, Cancer Vaccines, Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay, Female, Gangliosides, Guinea Pigs, Hypersensitivity, Delayed, Immunoglobulin G, Melanoma
Show Abstract · Added February 16, 2016
Allogenic whole cell and lysate cancer vaccines are associated with very different clinical outcome, which could be due to different immune responses to critical tumor-associated antigens. We used a guinea pig model to evaluate the immune responses to melanoma-associated carbohydrate antigens administered in whole cell and soluble lysate vaccines produced from the same cell lines and administered with or without Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG). Animals immunized with whole cell vaccine developed a significantly higher delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction. The IgG response to all tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens except GD2 was significantly higher in animals immunized with whole cell vaccine than lysate vaccine. This study indicates that whole cell vaccine is superior to soluble or lysate vaccine because it induces a better immune response against cell-surface antigens. The addition of BCG significantly increased the antibody response, suggesting that an exogenous adjuvant may immunopotentiate antigens better in the presence of an intact cell membrane.
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15 MeSH Terms
Immune cell populations in cutaneous delayed-type hypersensitivity.
Platt JL, Grant BW, Eddy AA, Michael AF
(1983) J Exp Med 158: 1227-42
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antibodies, Monoclonal, B-Lymphocytes, Female, Humans, Hypersensitivity, Delayed, Immunity, Cellular, Langerhans Cells, Lymphocyte Activation, Male, Mice, Monocytes, Phenotype, Rabbits, Skin, T-Lymphocytes, Tuberculin
Show Abstract · Added February 3, 2012
Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) is a prototypic T lymphocyte-mediated response to antigenic challenge. In this study, mononuclear cells infiltrating the skin during cutaneous response to tuberculin in presensitized human subjects (responders) and nonimmune controls were identified using monoclonal antibodies by indirect immunofluorescence. In both responders and controls the infiltrate consisted mainly of T lymphocytes (T11+ and OKT3+) and monocytes (OKM1+, 63D3+, Mo2+) which initially accumulated in proximity to small blood vessels and later infiltrated the interstitial dermis and epidermis. More T lymphocytes reacted with OKT4 than with OKT8. 6 h after tuberculin the ratio of OKT4/OKT8 in tissue from responders exceeded that in blood, whereas in tissues studied at 15-48 h and in all control tissues those ratios in blood and tissue were similar. Evidence of T lymphocyte activation was sought using monoclonal antibodies anti-Tac, OKT9, and OKT10. In responders but not in controls the proportion of infiltrating cells reactive with these antibodies increased during the course of DTH. The presence of activated T lymphocytes in tissue was not associated with a comparable increase in peripheral blood cell populations identified by anti-Tac and OKT10. Studies using anti-B1, Leu-7, and anti-IgD/IgM revealed comparatively few reactive cells. Dual-labeling studies demonstrated that most Leu-7--reactive cells also bound T11 while fewer bound OKM1 or OKT8 and that cells reactive with OKIa1 and T11 constituted largely nonoverlapping populations. Specific patterns of reactivity were not observed when tissues were stained with anti-human C3, or poly C9-MA, a monoclonal antibody reactive with a neoantigen on polymerized C9 of the membrane attack complex of complement. The number of epidermal Langerhans cells identified by OKT6 was similar in responders and controls. Thus, the cutaneous response to tuberculin in sensitized individuals is characterized by early enrichment of the OKT4 subpopulation of T lymphocytes in tissue infiltrates and subsequent (15-48 h) evidence of T lymphocyte activation.
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17 MeSH Terms
Autoimmune vasculitis in MRL/Mp-lpr/lpr mice: orthochromatic basophils participate in the development of delayed-type hypersensitivity angiitis.
Moyer CF, Jerome WG, Taylor R, Tulli H, Reinisch CL
(1992) Autoimmunity 12: 159-65
MeSH Terms: Animals, Autoimmune Diseases, Basophils, Hypersensitivity, Delayed, Lymphoproliferative Disorders, Mice, Vasculitis
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
The pathogenesis of autoimmune vasculitis is poorly understood. Understanding the immunologic mechanisms governing this disease requires precise identification of the cells which comprise the lesion. In this report, we have evaluated tissue sections from MRL/lpr mice from 16 to 45 weeks of age, representing all stages of clinical vasculitis. We demonstrate that basophil myelocytes participate in the evolution of the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response which initiates and perpetuates autoimmune vasculitis in these mice. These findings raise questions regarding the immunologic mechanisms by which basophils develop in this lesion and the interaction of basophils. VSMCs and lymphocytes in vasculitic angiodestruction.
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7 MeSH Terms