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Consider Changing the Horse for Your CAR-T?
Wilson MH
(2018) Mol Ther 26: 1873-1874
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antigens, CD19, Heterografts, Horses, Immunoglobulin G, Immunotherapy, Adoptive, T-Lymphocytes
Added December 13, 2018
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7 MeSH Terms
Horse Liver Alcohol Dehydrogenase: Zinc Coordination and Catalysis.
Plapp BV, Savarimuthu BR, Ferraro DJ, Rubach JK, Brown EN, Ramaswamy S
(2017) Biochemistry 56: 3632-3646
MeSH Terms: 2,2'-Dipyridyl, Adenosine Diphosphate Ribose, Alcohol Dehydrogenase, Animals, Catalytic Domain, Crystallography, X-Ray, Formamides, Horses, Kinetics, Liver, Models, Molecular, NAD, Phenanthrolines, Protein Binding, Protein Conformation, Water, Zinc
Show Abstract · Added August 31, 2017
During catalysis by liver alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), a water bound to the catalytic zinc is replaced by the oxygen of the substrates. The mechanism might involve a pentacoordinated zinc or a double-displacement reaction with participation by a nearby glutamate residue, as suggested by studies of human ADH3, yeast ADH1, and some other tetrameric ADHs. Zinc coordination and participation of water in the enzyme mechanism were investigated by X-ray crystallography. The apoenzyme and its complex with adenosine 5'-diphosphoribose have an open protein conformation with the catalytic zinc in one position, tetracoordinated by Cys-46, His-67, Cys-174, and a water molecule. The bidentate chelators 2,2'-bipyridine and 1,10-phenanthroline displace the water and form a pentacoordinated zinc. The enzyme-NADH complex has a closed conformation similar to that of ternary complexes with coenzyme and substrate analogues; the coordination of the catalytic zinc is similar to that found in the apoenzyme, except that a minor, alternative position for the catalytic zinc is ∼1.3 Å from the major position and closer to Glu-68, which could form the alternative coordination to the catalytic zinc. Complexes with NADH and N-1-methylhexylformamide or N-benzylformamide (or with NAD and fluoro alcohols) have the classical tetracoordinated zinc, and no water is bound to the zinc or the nicotinamide rings. The major forms of the enzyme in the mechanism have a tetracoordinated zinc, where the carboxylate group of Glu-68 could participate in the exchange of water and substrates on the zinc. Hydride transfer in the Michaelis complexes does not involve a nearby water.
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17 MeSH Terms
Protein structure prediction guided by crosslinking restraints--A systematic evaluation of the impact of the crosslinking spacer length.
Hofmann T, Fischer AW, Meiler J, Kalkhof S
(2015) Methods 89: 79-90
MeSH Terms: Animals, Chromatography, Liquid, Cross-Linking Reagents, Forecasting, Horses, Protein Conformation, Protein Folding, Proteins, Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Show Abstract · Added February 5, 2016
Recent development of high-resolution mass spectrometry (MS) instruments enables chemical crosslinking (XL) to become a high-throughput method for obtaining structural information about proteins. Restraints derived from XL-MS experiments have been used successfully for structure refinement and protein-protein docking. However, one formidable question is under which circumstances XL-MS data might be sufficient to determine a protein's tertiary structure de novo? Answering this question will not only include understanding the impact of XL-MS data on sampling and scoring within a de novo protein structure prediction algorithm, it must also determine an optimal crosslinker type and length for protein structure determination. While a longer crosslinker will yield more restraints, the value of each restraint for protein structure prediction decreases as the restraint is consistent with a larger conformational space. In this study, the number of crosslinks and their discriminative power was systematically analyzed in silico on a set of 2055 non-redundant protein folds considering Lys-Lys, Lys-Asp, Lys-Glu, Cys-Cys, and Arg-Arg reactive crosslinkers between 1 and 60Å. Depending on the protein size a heuristic was developed that determines the optimal crosslinker length. Next, simulated restraints of variable length were used to de novo predict the tertiary structure of fifteen proteins using the BCL::Fold algorithm. The results demonstrate that a distinct crosslinker length exists for which information content for de novo protein structure prediction is maximized. The sampling accuracy improves on average by 1.0 Å and up to 2.2 Å in the most prominent example. XL-MS restraints enable consistently an improved selection of native-like models with an average enrichment of 2.1.
Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.
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9 MeSH Terms
Crystal structures of wild-type and mutated cyclophilin B that causes hyperelastosis cutis in the American quarter horse.
Boudko SP, Ishikawa Y, Lerch TF, Nix J, Chapman MS, Bächinger HP
(2012) BMC Res Notes 5: 626
MeSH Terms: Animals, Crystallography, X-Ray, Cyclophilins, Horse Diseases, Horses, Models, Molecular, Mutation, Missense, Protein Structure, Secondary, Protein Structure, Tertiary, Skin, Skin Diseases
Show Abstract · Added November 2, 2017
BACKGROUND - Hyperelastosis cutis is an inherited autosomal recessive connective tissue disorder. Affected horses are characterized by hyperextensible skin, scarring, and severe lesions along the back. The disorder is caused by a mutation in cyclophilin B.
RESULTS - The crystal structures of both wild-type and mutated (Gly6->Arg) horse cyclophilin B are presented. The mutation neither affects the overall fold of the enzyme nor impairs the catalytic site structure. Instead, it locally rearranges the flexible N-terminal end of the polypeptide chain and also makes it more rigid.
CONCLUSIONS - Interactions of the mutated cyclophilin B with a set of endoplasmic reticulum-resident proteins must be affected.
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11 MeSH Terms
Mutation in cyclophilin B that causes hyperelastosis cutis in American Quarter Horse does not affect peptidylprolyl cis-trans isomerase activity but shows altered cyclophilin B-protein interactions and affects collagen folding.
Ishikawa Y, Vranka JA, Boudko SP, Pokidysheva E, Mizuno K, Zientek K, Keene DR, Rashmir-Raven AM, Nagata K, Winand NJ, Bächinger HP
(2012) J Biol Chem 287: 22253-65
MeSH Terms: Animals, Asthenia, Circular Dichroism, Collagen, Cyclophilins, Endoplasmic Reticulum, Rough, Horses, Kinetics, Mice, Mice, Transgenic, Molecular Chaperones, Mutation, Peptidylprolyl Isomerase, Protein Binding, Protein Folding, Protein Structure, Tertiary, Skin Diseases, Surface Plasmon Resonance, cis-trans-Isomerases
Show Abstract · Added November 2, 2017
The rate-limiting step of folding of the collagen triple helix is catalyzed by cyclophilin B (CypB). The G6R mutation in cyclophilin B found in the American Quarter Horse leads to autosomal recessive hyperelastosis cutis, also known as hereditary equine regional dermal asthenia. The mutant protein shows small structural changes in the region of the mutation at the side opposite the catalytic domain of CypB. The peptidylprolyl cis-trans isomerase activity of the mutant CypB is normal when analyzed in vitro. However, the biosynthesis of type I collagen in affected horse fibroblasts shows a delay in folding and secretion and a decrease in hydroxylysine and glucosyl-galactosyl hydroxylysine. This leads to changes in the structure of collagen fibrils in tendon, similar to those observed in P3H1 null mice. In contrast to cyclophilin B null mice, where little 3-hydroxylation was found in type I collagen, 3-hydroxylation of type I collagen in affected horses is normal. The mutation disrupts the interaction of cyclophilin B with the P-domain of calreticulin, with lysyl hydroxylase 1, and probably other proteins, such as the formation of the P3H1·CypB·cartilage-associated protein complex, resulting in less effective catalysis of the rate-limiting step in collagen folding in the rough endoplasmic reticulum.
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19 MeSH Terms
Dual source ion mobility-mass spectrometer for direct comparison of electrospray ionization and MALDI collision cross section measurements.
Sundarapandian S, May JC, McLean JA
(2010) Anal Chem 82: 3247-54
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Animals, Cytochromes c, Hemoglobins, Horses, Humans, Molecular Sequence Data, Spectrometry, Mass, Electrospray Ionization, Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization
Show Abstract · Added December 17, 2018
In this report, we describe a dual ionization source ion mobility-mass spectrometer (IM-MS) instrument platform for investigations that critically compare ion mobility collision cross section (CCS) measurements obtained from different ionization methods. The instrument incorporates both matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) and nanoelectrospray ionization (nESI) sources. The nESI source incorporates a keyhole geometry ion funnel design which facilitates axial ion focusing, accumulation, and generation of short duration (10-30 mus) ion pulses for use with the IM-MS. The IM-MS instrument operation is independent of which ionization source is used. This allows comparisons of collision cross section measurements to be made between both ion sources with minimal differences in the instrumental arrangement. The performance of the nESI ion source is evaluated by measuring the collision cross section values of the charge states of equine cytochrome c (z = 9-16), and values are in good agreement (<2% deviation) with those previously reported in the literature. Several charge states (z = 8-11) of cytochrome c exhibit multiple cross sectional features in the ion mobility analysis. An analysis of the tryptic peptides of cytochrome c formed by both ESI and MALDI demonstrate that, on average, +1 MALDI ions are similar in CCS to +1 ESI ions and are smaller than +2 ESI ions. The ion mobility resolving power with ESI (30-35) is comparable to that obtained using MALDI (35-40), which suggests that both sources produce sufficiently narrow ion pulses for the measurement to be predominately diffusion rather than gate pulse width limited.
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MeSH Terms
Fragmentation of multiply-charged intact protein ions using MALDI TOF-TOF mass spectrometry.
Liu Z, Schey KL
(2008) J Am Soc Mass Spectrom 19: 231-8
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Animals, Awards and Prizes, Cattle, Escherichia coli Proteins, Horses, Lactoglobulins, Milk Proteins, Molecular Sequence Data, Myoglobin, Proteins, Proteomics, Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization, Thioredoxins, Ubiquitin
Show Abstract · Added May 27, 2014
Top down proteomics in a TOF-TOF instrument was further explored by examining the fragmentation of multiply charged precursors ions generated by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization. Evaluation of sample preparation conditions allowed selection of solvent/matrix conditions and sample deposition methods to produce sufficiently abundant doubly and triply charged precursor ions for subsequent CID experiments. As previously reported, preferential cleavage was observed at sites C-terminal to acidic residues and N-terminal to proline residues for all ions examined. An increase in nonpreferential fragmentation as well as additional low mass product ions was observed in the spectra from multiply charged precursor ions providing increased sequence coverage. This enhanced fragmentation from multiply charged precursor ions became increasingly important with increasing protein molecular weight and facilitates protein identification using database searching algorithms. The useable mass range for MALDI TOF-TOF analysis of intact proteins has been expanded to 18.2 kDa using this approach.
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15 MeSH Terms
Polyclonal antibody-induced serum sickness in renal transplant recipients: treatment with therapeutic plasma exchange.
Tanriover B, Chuang P, Fishbach B, Helderman JH, Kizilisik T, Nylander W, Shaffer D, Langone AJ
(2005) Transplantation 80: 279-81
MeSH Terms: Adult, Animals, Antilymphocyte Serum, Female, Horses, Humans, Immunosuppressive Agents, Kidney Transplantation, Male, Mice, Middle Aged, Plasma Exchange, Rabbits, Serum Sickness, Tissue Donors
Show Abstract · Added March 4, 2014
Serum sickness is an immune-complex mediated illness that frequently occurs in patients after polyclonal antibody therapy (ATGAM or thymoglobulin). Serum sickness presents with significant morbidity but is self-limited and resolves with prolonged steroid therapy. We present five renal transplant patients who developed serum sickness after polyclonal antibody treatment with severe symptoms that persisted after being started on systemic steroids. These patients underwent one or two courses of therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) with subsequent complete resolution of their symptoms. Renal transplant recipients with serum sickness after polyclonal antibody therapy may benefit from TPE by accelerating their time to recovery and thereby reducing overall morbidity.
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15 MeSH Terms
Unusual susceptibility of heme proteins to damage by glucose during non-enzymatic glycation.
Cussimanio BL, Booth AA, Todd P, Hudson BG, Khalifah RG
(2003) Biophys Chem 105: 743-55
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cattle, Free Radicals, Glucose, Glycation End Products, Advanced, Glycosylation, Hemeproteins, Hemoglobins, Horses, Humans, Hydrogen Peroxide, Iron, Myoglobin, Oxidation-Reduction, Spectrum Analysis
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Glucose modifies the amino groups of proteins by a process of non-enzymatic glycation, leading to potentially deleterious effects on structure and function that have been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. These changes are extremely complex and occur very slowly. We demonstrate here that hemoglobin and myoglobin are extremely susceptible to damage by glucose in vitro through a process that leads to complete destruction of the essential heme group. This process appears in addition to the expected formation of so-called advanced glycation end products (AGEs) on lysine and other side-chains. AGE formation is enhanced by the iron released. In contrast, the heme group is not destroyed during glycation of cytochrome c, where the sixth coordination position of the heme iron is not accessible to solvent ligands. Glycation leads to reduction of ferricytochrome c in this case. Since hydrogen peroxide is known to destroy heme, and the destruction observed during glycation of hemoglobin and myoglobin is sensitive to catalase, we propose that the degradation process is initiated by hydrogen peroxide formation. Damage may then occur through reaction with superoxide generated (a reductant of ferricytochrome c), or hydroxyl radicals, or with both.
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15 MeSH Terms
Effects of exogenous steroids on serum FSH and LH, and on follicular development in cyclic mares.
Evans MJ, Loy RG, Taylor TB, Barrows SP
(1982) J Reprod Fertil Suppl 32: 205-12
MeSH Terms: Animals, Estradiol, Estrus, Female, Follicle Stimulating Hormone, Horses, Kinetics, Luteinizing Hormone, Ovarian Follicle, Ovulation, Pregnancy, Progesterone
Show Abstract · Added May 12, 2010
Cyclic mares were given daily i.m. injections of 150 mg progesterone (Group P, N = 4), 150 mg progesterone and 10 mg oestradiol-17 beta (Group PE, N = 3), 10 mg oestradiol-17 beta (Group E, N = 3) or cottonseed oil vehicle (Group C, N = 4), from the day after ovulation (Day 1) to Day 28. Blood samples were collected daily, and the ovaries were palpated every 1-2 days. Serum FSH and LH concentrations were measured in all samples, and means determined for 7 consecutive 4-day periods throughout treatment. Comparisons within each steroid treatment group between time periods and comparisons between hormone treatment groups within each time period were made to investigate the way in which these ovarian steroids control cyclic gonadotrophin changes in the mare. The increase in LH during oestrus in Group C mares (controls) appeared to be inhibited by progesterone, resulting in low LH concentrations and failure of preovulatory-sized follicles to ovulate. In Group PE LH concentrations were lower than those in Group P, resulting in suppression of the development of the largest follicle. In Group E, treatment had little effect on FSH and LH concentrations, while follicular development was variable (ovulations on Days 25, 33 and 36). None of the steroid treatments appeared to suppress FSH concentrations directly but FSH concentrations showed a reciprocal relationship with the LH-dependent follicular development.
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12 MeSH Terms