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Histone deacetylase 3 controls a transcriptional network required for B cell maturation.
Stengel KR, Bhaskara S, Wang J, Liu Q, Ellis JD, Sampathi S, Hiebert SW
(2019) Nucleic Acids Res 47: 10612-10627
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antigens, CD19, B-Lymphocytes, Base Sequence, Cell Differentiation, Gene Expression Regulation, Gene Regulatory Networks, Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors, Histone Deacetylases, Lipopolysaccharides, Lymphocyte Activation, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Plasma Cells, Positive Regulatory Domain I-Binding Factor 1, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-6, Repressor Proteins, Transcription, Genetic, Up-Regulation
Show Abstract · Added October 25, 2019
Histone deacetylase 3 (Hdac3) is a target of the FDA approved HDAC inhibitors, which are used for the treatment of lymphoid malignancies. Here, we used Cd19-Cre to conditionally delete Hdac3 to define its role in germinal center B cells, which represent the cell of origin for many B cell malignancies. Cd19-Cre-Hdac3-/- mice showed impaired germinal center formation along with a defect in plasmablast production. Analysis of Hdac3-/- germinal centers revealed a reduction in dark zone centroblasts and accumulation of light zone centrocytes. RNA-seq revealed a significant correlation between genes up-regulated upon Hdac3 loss and those up-regulated in Foxo1-deleted germinal center B cells, even though Foxo1 typically activates transcription. Therefore, to determine whether gene expression changes observed in Hdac3-/- germinal centers were a result of direct effects of Hdac3 deacetylase activity, we used an HDAC3 selective inhibitor and examined nascent transcription in germinal center-derived cell lines. Transcriptional changes upon HDAC3 inhibition were enriched for light zone gene signatures as observed in germinal centers. Further comparison of PRO-seq data with ChIP-seq/exo data for BCL6, SMRT, FOXO1 and H3K27ac identified direct targets of HDAC3 function including CD86, CD83 and CXCR5 that are likely responsible for driving the light zone phenotype observed in vivo.
© The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.
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18 MeSH Terms
HDAC11 suppresses the thermogenic program of adipose tissue via BRD2.
Bagchi RA, Ferguson BS, Stratton MS, Hu T, Cavasin MA, Sun L, Lin YH, Liu D, Londono P, Song K, Pino MF, Sparks LM, Smith SR, Scherer PE, Collins S, Seto E, McKinsey TA
(2018) JCI Insight 3:
MeSH Terms: Adipose Tissue, Brown, Adipose Tissue, White, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Animals, Diet, High-Fat, Disease Models, Animal, Energy Metabolism, Epigenesis, Genetic, Fatty Liver, Female, Gene Expression Regulation, Histone Deacetylases, Humans, Insulin Resistance, Male, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Middle Aged, Obesity, Thermogenesis, Transcription Factors
Show Abstract · Added July 22, 2020
Little is known about the biological function of histone deacetylase 11 (HDAC11), which is the lone class IV HDAC. Here, we demonstrate that deletion of HDAC11 in mice stimulates brown adipose tissue (BAT) formation and beiging of white adipose tissue (WAT). Consequently, HDAC11-deficient mice exhibit enhanced thermogenic potential and, in response to high-fat feeding, attenuated obesity, improved insulin sensitivity, and reduced hepatic steatosis. Ex vivo and cell-based assays revealed that HDAC11 catalytic activity suppresses the BAT transcriptional program, in both the basal state and in response to β-adrenergic receptor signaling, through a mechanism that is dependent on physical association with BRD2, a bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) acetyl-histone-binding protein. These findings define an epigenetic pathway for the regulation of energy homeostasis and suggest the potential for HDAC11-selective inhibitors for the treatment of obesity and diabetes.
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HDAC3 is a molecular brake of the metabolic switch supporting white adipose tissue browning.
Ferrari A, Longo R, Fiorino E, Silva R, Mitro N, Cermenati G, Gilardi F, Desvergne B, Andolfo A, Magagnotti C, Caruso D, Fabiani E, Hiebert SW, Crestani M
(2017) Nat Commun 8: 93
MeSH Terms: Adipocytes, Adipose Tissue, Brown, Adipose Tissue, White, Animals, Cell Line, Diet, High-Fat, Gene Expression Regulation, Gene Silencing, Histone Deacetylases, Lipid Metabolism, Male, Mice, Mice, Knockout
Show Abstract · Added February 7, 2019
White adipose tissue (WAT) can undergo a phenotypic switch, known as browning, in response to environmental stimuli such as cold. Post-translational modifications of histones have been shown to regulate cellular energy metabolism, but their role in white adipose tissue physiology remains incompletely understood. Here we show that histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) regulates WAT metabolism and function. Selective ablation of Hdac3 in fat switches the metabolic signature of WAT by activating a futile cycle of de novo fatty acid synthesis and β-oxidation that potentiates WAT oxidative capacity and ultimately supports browning. Specific ablation of Hdac3 in adipose tissue increases acetylation of enhancers in Pparg and Ucp1 genes, and of putative regulatory regions of the Ppara gene. Our results unveil HDAC3 as a regulator of WAT physiology, which acts as a molecular brake that inhibits fatty acid metabolism and WAT browning.Histone deacetylases, such as HDAC3, have been shown to alter cellular metabolism in various tissues. Here the authors show that HDAC3 regulates WAT metabolism by activating a futile cycle of fatty acid synthesis and oxidation, which supports WAT browning.
1 Communities
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MeSH Terms
Imbalance between HDAC and HAT activities drives aberrant STAT1/MyD88 expression in macrophages from type 1 diabetic mice.
Filgueiras LR, Brandt SL, Ramalho TR, Jancar S, Serezani CH
(2017) J Diabetes Complications 31: 334-339
MeSH Terms: Acetylation, Animals, Bone Marrow Cells, Cells, Cultured, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1, Enzyme Inhibitors, Epigenesis, Genetic, Gene Expression Regulation, Glucose, Histone Acetyltransferases, Histone Deacetylases, Histones, Macrophages, Macrophages, Peritoneal, Male, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Myeloid Differentiation Factor 88, Osmolar Concentration, Promoter Regions, Genetic, Protein Processing, Post-Translational, STAT1 Transcription Factor, Streptozocin
Show Abstract · Added May 4, 2017
AIMS - To investigate the hypothesis that alteration in histone acetylation/deacetylation triggers aberrant STAT1/MyD88 expression in macrophages from diabetics. Increased STAT1/MyD88 expression is correlated with sterile inflammation in type 1 diabetic (T1D) mice.
METHODS - To induce diabetes, we injected low-doses of streptozotocin in C57BL/6 mice. Peritoneal or bone marrow-differentiated macrophages were cultured in 5mM (low) or 25mM (high glucose). ChIP analysis of macrophages from nondiabetic or diabetic mice was performed to determine acetylation of lysine 9 in histone H3 in MyD88 and STAT1 promoter regions. Macrophages from diabetic mice were treated with the histone acetyltransferase inhibitor anacardic acid (AA), followed by determination of mRNA expression by qPCR.
RESULTS - Increased STAT1 and MyD88 expression in macrophages from diabetic but not naive mice cultured in low glucose persisted for up to 6days. Macrophages from diabetic mice exhibited increased activity of histone acetyltransferases (HAT) and decreased histone deacetylases (HDAC) activity. We detected increased H3K9Ac binding to Stat1/Myd88 promoters in macrophages from T1D mice and AA in vitro treatment reduced STAT1 and MyD88 mRNA expression.
CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION - These results indicate that histone acetylation drives elevated Stat1/Myd88 expression in macrophages from diabetic mice, and this mechanism may be involved in sterile inflammation and diabetes comorbidities.
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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22 MeSH Terms
Histone Deacetylase 3 Is Required for Efficient T Cell Development.
Stengel KR, Zhao Y, Klus NJ, Kaiser JF, Gordy LE, Joyce S, Hiebert SW, Summers AR
(2015) Mol Cell Biol 35: 3854-65
MeSH Terms: Animals, CD4 Antigens, CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes, CD8 Antigens, CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes, Cell Differentiation, Gene Deletion, Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental, Histone Deacetylases, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Mice, Transgenic, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2, Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell, alpha-beta, T-Lymphocytes, bcl-X Protein
Show Abstract · Added September 28, 2015
Hdac3 is a key target for Hdac inhibitors that are efficacious in cutaneous T cell lymphoma. Moreover, the regulation of chromatin structure is critical as thymocytes transition from an immature cell with open chromatin to a mature T cell with tightly condensed chromatin. To define the phenotypes controlled by Hdac3 during T cell development, we conditionally deleted Hdac3 using the Lck-Cre transgene. This strategy inactivated Hdac3 in the double-negative stages of thymocyte development and caused a significant impairment at the CD8 immature single-positive (ISP) stage and the CD4/CD8 double-positive stage, with few mature CD4(+) or CD8(+) single-positive cells being produced. When Hdac3(-/-) mice were crossed with Bcl-xL-, Bcl2-, or TCRβ-expressing transgenic mice, a modest level of complementation was found. However, when the null mice were crossed with mice expressing a fully rearranged T cell receptor αβ transgene, normal levels of CD4 single-positive cells were produced. Thus, Hdac3 is required for the efficient transit from double-negative stage 4 through positive selection.
Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.
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18 MeSH Terms
Histone Deacetylase 3 Is Required for T Cell Maturation.
Hsu FC, Belmonte PJ, Constans MM, Chen MW, McWilliams DC, Hiebert SW, Shapiro VS
(2015) J Immunol 195: 1578-90
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bone Marrow Cells, Cell Differentiation, Cell Movement, Complement Activation, Complement System Proteins, Histone Deacetylases, Homeostasis, Interleukin-7, Lymphocyte Count, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Mice, Transgenic, T-Lymphocyte Subsets, T-Lymphocytes, Thymus Gland, Tumor Necrosis Factors
Show Abstract · Added September 28, 2015
Recent thymic emigrants are newly generated T cells that need to undergo postthymic maturation to gain functional competency and enter the long-lived naive T cell pool. The mechanism of T cell maturation remains incompletely understood. Previously, we demonstrated that the transcriptional repressor NKAP is required for T cell maturation. Because NKAP associates with histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3), we examined whether HDAC3 is also required for T cell maturation. Although thymic populations are similar in CD4-cre HDAC3 conditional knockout mice compared with wild-type mice, the peripheral numbers of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells are dramatically decreased. In the periphery, the majority of HDAC3-deficient naive T cells are recent thymic emigrants, indicating a block in T cell maturation. CD55 upregulation during T cell maturation is substantially decreased in HDAC3-deficient T cells. Consistent with a block in functional maturation, HDAC3-deficient peripheral T cells have a defect in TNF licensing after TCR/CD28 stimulation. CD4-cre HDAC3 conditional knockout mice do not have a defect in intrathymic migration, thymic egress, T cell survival, or homeostasis. In the periphery, similar to immature NKAP-deficient peripheral T cells, HDAC3-deficient peripheral T cells were bound by IgM and complement proteins, leading to the elimination of these cells. In addition, HDAC3-deficient T cells display decreases in the sialic acid modifications on the cell surface that recruit natural IgM to initiate the classical complement pathway. Therefore, HDAC3 is required for T cell maturation.
Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.
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17 MeSH Terms
SOX4 interacts with EZH2 and HDAC3 to suppress microRNA-31 in invasive esophageal cancer cells.
Koumangoye RB, Andl T, Taubenslag KJ, Zilberman ST, Taylor CJ, Loomans HA, Andl CD
(2015) Mol Cancer 14: 24
MeSH Terms: 3' Untranslated Regions, Base Sequence, Binding Sites, Cell Line, Tumor, Down-Regulation, Enhancer of Zeste Homolog 2 Protein, Epigenesis, Genetic, Esophageal Neoplasms, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Histone Deacetylases, Humans, MicroRNAs, Neoplasm Invasiveness, Polycomb Repressive Complex 2, Protein Binding, RNA Interference, Repressor Proteins, SOXC Transcription Factors
Show Abstract · Added October 13, 2015
BACKGROUND - Tumor metastasis is responsible for 90% of cancer-related deaths. Recently, a strong link between microRNA dysregulation and human cancers has been established. However, the molecular mechanisms through which microRNAs regulate metastasis and cancer progression remain unclear.
METHODS - We analyzed the reciprocal expression regulation of miR-31 and SOX4 in esophageal squamous and adenocarcinoma cell lines by qRT-PCR and Western blotting using overexpression and shRNA knock-down approaches. Furthermore, methylation studies were used to assess epigenetic regulation of expression. Functionally, we determined the cellular consequences using migration and invasion assays, as well as proliferation assays. Immunoprecipitation and ChIP were used to identify complex formation of SOX4 and co-repressor components.
RESULTS - Here, we report that SOX4 promotes esophageal tumor cell proliferation and invasion by silencing miR-31 via activation and stabilization of a co-repressor complex with EZH2 and HDAC3. We demonstrate that miR-31 is significantly decreased in invasive esophageal cancer cells, while upregulation of miR-31 inhibits growth, migration and invasion of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) and squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cell lines. miR-31, in turn, targets SOX4 for degradation by directly binding to its 3'-UTR. Additionally, miR-31 regulates EZH2 and HDAC3 indirectly. SOX4, EZH2 and HDAC3 levels inversely correlate with miR-31 expression in ESCC cell lines. Ectopic expression of miR-31 in ESCC and EAC cell lines leads to down regulation of SOX4, EZH2 and HDAC3. Conversely, pharmacologic and genetic inhibition of SOX4 and EZH2 restore miR-31 expression. We show that SOX4, EZH2 and HDAC3 form a co-repressor complex that binds to the miR-31 promoter, repressing miR-31 through an epigenetic mark by H3K27me3 and by histone acetylation. Clinically, when compared to normal adjacent tissues, esophageal tumor samples show upregulation of SOX4, EZH2, and HDAC3, and EZH2 expression is significantly increased in metastatic ESCC tissues.
CONCLUSIONS - Thus, we identified a novel molecular mechanism by which the SOX4, EZH2 and miR-31 circuit promotes tumor progression and potential therapeutic targets for invasive esophageal carcinomas.
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18 MeSH Terms
FOXP3+ regulatory T cell development and function require histone/protein deacetylase 3.
Wang L, Liu Y, Han R, Beier UH, Bhatti TR, Akimova T, Greene MI, Hiebert SW, Hancock WW
(2015) J Clin Invest 125: 1111-23
MeSH Terms: Animals, Autoimmunity, Cells, Cultured, Forkhead Transcription Factors, Gene Expression Regulation, HEK293 Cells, Histone Deacetylases, Humans, Interleukin-2, Lymphocyte Activation, Male, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory
Show Abstract · Added September 28, 2015
Treg dysfunction is associated with a variety of inflammatory diseases. Treg populations are defined by expression of the oligomeric transcription factor FOXP3 and inability to produce IL-2, a cytokine required for T cell maintenance and survival. FOXP3 activity is regulated post-translationally by histone/protein acetyltransferases and histone/protein deacetylases (HDACs). Here, we determined that HDAC3 mediates both the development and function of the two main Treg subsets, thymus-derived Tregs and induced Tregs (iTregs). We determined that HDAC3 and FOXP3 physically interact and that HDAC3 expression markedly reduces Il2 promoter activity. In murine models, conditional deletion of Hdac3 during thymic Treg development restored Treg production of IL-2 and blocked the suppressive function of Tregs. HDAC3-deficient mice died from autoimmunity by 4-6 weeks of age; however, injection of WT FOXP3+ Tregs prolonged survival. Adoptive transfer of Hdac3-deficient Tregs, unlike WT Tregs, did not control T cell proliferation in naive mice and did not prevent allograft rejection or colitis. HDAC3 also regulated the development of iTregs, as HDAC3-deficient conventional T cells were not converted into iTregs under polarizing conditions and produced large amounts of IL-2, IL-6, and IL-17. We conclude that HDAC3 is essential for the normal development and suppressive functions of thymic and peripheral FOXP3+ Tregs.
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15 MeSH Terms
A Phase I Study of CUDC-101, a Multitarget Inhibitor of HDACs, EGFR, and HER2, in Combination with Chemoradiation in Patients with Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma.
Galloway TJ, Wirth LJ, Colevas AD, Gilbert J, Bauman JE, Saba NF, Raben D, Mehra R, Ma AW, Atoyan R, Wang J, Burtness B, Jimeno A
(2015) Clin Cancer Res 21: 1566-73
MeSH Terms: Aged, Antineoplastic Agents, Carcinoma, Squamous Cell, Chemoradiotherapy, Cisplatin, ErbB Receptors, Female, Head and Neck Neoplasms, Histone Deacetylases, Humans, Hydroxamic Acids, Male, Maximum Tolerated Dose, Middle Aged, Quinazolines, Radiotherapy, Receptor, ErbB-2, Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Head and Neck
Show Abstract · Added February 17, 2015
PURPOSE - CUDC-101 is a small molecule that simultaneously inhibits the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), human growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), and histone deacetylase (HDAC) with preclinical activity in head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC). The primary objective of this investigation is to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of CUDC-101 with cisplatin-radiotherapy in the treatment of HNSCC.
EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN - CUDC-101 monotherapy was administered intravenously three times weekly (Monday, Wednesday, Friday) for a one-week run-in, then continued with concurrent cisplatin (100 mg/m(2) every 3 weeks) and external beam radiation (70 Gy to gross disease) over 7 weeks.
RESULTS - Twelve patients with intermediate or high-risk HNSCC enrolled. Eleven were p16INKa (p16)-negative. The MTD of CUDC-101-based combination therapy was established at 275 mg/m(2)/dose. Five patients discontinued CUDC-101 due to an adverse event (AE); only one was considered a dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), at the MTD. Pharmacokinetic evaluation suggested low accumulation with this dosing regimen. HDAC inhibition was demonstrated by pharmacodynamic analyses in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), tumor biopsies, and paired skin biopsies. Paired tumor biopsies demonstrated a trend of EGFR inhibition. At 1.5 years of median follow-up, there has been one recurrence and two patient deaths (neither attributed to CUDC-101). The remaining nine patients are free of progression.
CONCLUSIONS - CUDC-101, cisplatin, and radiation were feasible in intermediate-/high-risk patients with HNSCC, with no unexpected patterns of AE. Although the MTD was identified, a high rate of DLT-independent discontinuation of CUDC-101 suggests a need for alternate schedules or routes of administration.
©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.
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18 MeSH Terms
HDAC3 is essential for DNA replication in hematopoietic progenitor cells.
Summers AR, Fischer MA, Stengel KR, Zhao Y, Kaiser JF, Wells CE, Hunt A, Bhaskara S, Luzwick JW, Sampathi S, Chen X, Thompson MA, Cortez D, Hiebert SW
(2013) J Clin Invest 123: 3112-23
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bone Marrow Cells, Bone Marrow Transplantation, Cell Differentiation, Cell Proliferation, Cells, Cultured, DNA Replication, Hematopoietic Stem Cells, Histone Deacetylases, Lymphopoiesis, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, S Phase, Spleen, Transcriptome
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
Histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) contributes to the regulation of gene expression, chromatin structure, and genomic stability. Because HDAC3 associates with oncoproteins that drive leukemia and lymphoma, we engineered a conditional deletion allele in mice to explore the physiological roles of Hdac3 in hematopoiesis. We used the Vav-Cre transgenic allele to trigger recombination, which yielded a dramatic loss of lymphoid cells, hypocellular bone marrow, and mild anemia. Phenotypic and functional analysis suggested that Hdac3 was required for the formation of the earliest lymphoid progenitor cells in the marrow, but that the marrow contained 3-5 times more multipotent progenitor cells. Hdac3(-/-) stem cells were severely compromised in competitive bone marrow transplantation. In vitro, Hdac3(-/-) stem and progenitor cells failed to proliferate, and most cells remained undifferentiated. Moreover, one-third of the Hdac3(-/-) stem and progenitor cells were in S phase 2 hours after BrdU labeling in vivo, suggesting that these cells were impaired in transit through the S phase. DNA fiber-labeling experiments indicated that Hdac3 was required for efficient DNA replication in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Thus, Hdac3 is required for the passage of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells through the S phase, for stem cell functions, and for lymphopoiesis.
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16 MeSH Terms