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Genetic background impacts developmental potential of enteric neural crest-derived progenitors in the Sox10Dom model of Hirschsprung disease.
Walters LC, Cantrell VA, Weller KP, Mosher JT, Southard-Smith EM
(2010) Hum Mol Genet 19: 4353-72
MeSH Terms: Animals, CD57 Antigens, Disease Models, Animal, Enteric Nervous System, Ganglia, Hirschsprung Disease, Humans, Immunohistochemistry, Intestine, Small, Intestines, Mice, Mice, Congenic, Mice, Inbred C3H, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mutation, Neural Crest, SOXE Transcription Factors, Species Specificity, Stem Cells
Show Abstract · Added November 14, 2013
Abnormalities in the development of enteric neural crest-derived progenitors (ENPs) that generate the enteric nervous system (ENS) can lead to aganglionosis in a variable portion of the distal gastrointestinal tract. Cumulative evidence suggests that variation of aganglionosis is due to gene interactions that modulate the ability of ENPs to populate the intestine; however, the developmental processes underlying this effect are unknown. We hypothesized that differences in enteric ganglion deficits could be attributable to the effects of genetic background on early developmental processes, including migration, proliferation, or lineage divergence. Developmental processes were investigated in congenic Sox10(Dom) mice, an established Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) model, on distinct inbred backgrounds, C57BL/6J (B6) and C3HeB/FeJ (C3Fe). Immuno-staining on whole-mount fetal gut tissue and dissociated cell suspensions was used to assess migration and proliferation. Flow cytometry utilizing the cell surface markers p75 and HNK-1 was used to isolate live ENPs for analysis of developmental potential. Frequency of ENPs was reduced in Sox10(Dom) embryos relative to wild-type embryos, but was unaffected by genetic background. Both migration and developmental potential of ENPs in Sox10(Dom) embryos were altered by inbred strain background with the most highly significant differences seen for developmental potential between strains and genotypes. In vivo imaging of fetal ENPs and postnatal ganglia demonstrates that altered lineage divergence impacts ganglia in the proximal intestine. Our analysis demonstrates that genetic background alters early ENS development and suggests that abnormalities in lineage diversification can shift the proportions of ENP populations and thus may contribute to ENS deficiencies in vivo.
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19 MeSH Terms
Comparing cost and complications of primary and staged surgical repair of neonatally diagnosed Hirschsprung's disease.
Shinall MC, Koehler E, Shyr Y, Lovvorn HN
(2008) J Pediatr Surg 43: 2220-5
MeSH Terms: Colostomy, Cost-Benefit Analysis, Direct Service Costs, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Hirschsprung Disease, Hospital Charges, Hospital Costs, Hospitals, Pediatric, Hospitals, University, Humans, Infant, Newborn, Laparoscopy, Length of Stay, Male, Postoperative Complications, Retrospective Studies, Tennessee
Show Abstract · Added December 26, 2013
BACKGROUND/PURPOSE - We questioned whether primary surgical correction of neonatally diagnosed Hirschsprung's Disease (HD) incurs higher costs or increased incidence of adverse events (AE) when compared with staged repair.
METHODS - We reviewed the medical records of all neonates diagnosed with HD at our institution between 1997 and 2007. Sixty subjects fulfilled criteria for inclusion. Twenty-seven neonates had primary repair, and 33 had staged repair. We measured inflation-adjusted total costs, direct costs, and total charges and 6 AE between the 2 groups. A generalized linear model was used to examine differences between group variables.
RESULTS - We found no statistically significant difference in costs or AE between primary and staged repair. Inflation-adjusted median financial data for primary or staged repair were, respectively, as follows: total costs, $35,670 vs $38,538 (P = .617); direct costs, $18,453 vs $23,937 (P = .128); total charges, $107,315 vs $102,492 (P = .690). Adverse events occurred in 48% of primary repair subjects and 36% of staged repair subjects (P = .434); no single AE differed significantly between the two groups.
CONCLUSIONS - We found no statistical evidence that primary neonatal correction of HD adds cost or risk of AE when compared with a traditional staged approach in neonates who met inclusion criteria.
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18 MeSH Terms
Genome-wide linkage identifies novel modifier loci of aganglionosis in the Sox10Dom model of Hirschsprung disease.
Owens SE, Broman KW, Wiltshire T, Elmore JB, Bradley KM, Smith JR, Southard-Smith EM
(2005) Hum Mol Genet 14: 1549-58
MeSH Terms: Alleles, Animals, Chromosomes, Human, Pair 5, DNA-Binding Proteins, Genetic Linkage, Genome, Human, High Mobility Group Proteins, Hirschsprung Disease, Humans, Mice, Models, Genetic, Quantitative Trait Loci, SOXE Transcription Factors, Transcription Factors
Show Abstract · Added March 20, 2014
Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) is a complex disorder that exhibits incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity due to interactions among multiple susceptibility genes. Studies in HSCR families have identified RET-dependent modifiers for short-segment HSCR (S-HSCR), but epistatic effects in long-segment (L-HSCR) and syndromic cases have not been fully explained. SOX10 mutations contribute to syndromic HSCR cases and Sox10 alleles in mice exhibit aganglionosis and pigmentary anomalies typical of a subset of HSCR patients categorized as Waardenburg-Shah syndrome (WS4, OMIM 277580). Sox10 mutant alleles in mice exhibit strain-dependent variation in penetrance and expressivity of aganglionic megacolon analogous to the variation observed in patients with aganglionosis. In this study, we focused on enteric ganglia deficits in Sox10Dom mice and defined aganglionosis as a quantitative trait in Sox10Dom intercross progeny to investigate the contribution of strain background to variation in enteric nervous system deficits. We observe that the phenotype of Sox10Dom/+ mutants ranges over a continuum from severe aganglionosis to no detectable phenotype in the gut. To systematically identify genes that modulate Sox10-dependent aganglionosis, we performed a single nucleotide polymorphism-based genome scan in Sox10Dom/+ F1 intercross progeny. Our analysis reveals modifier loci on mouse chromosomes 3, 5, 8, 11 and 14 with distinct effects on penetrance and severity of aganglionosis. Three of these loci on chromosomes 3, 8 and 11 do not coincide with previously known aganglionosis susceptibility genes or modifier loci and offer new avenues for elucidating the genetic network that modulates this complex neurocristopathy.
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14 MeSH Terms
Interactions between Sox10 and EdnrB modulate penetrance and severity of aganglionosis in the Sox10Dom mouse model of Hirschsprung disease.
Cantrell VA, Owens SE, Chandler RL, Airey DC, Bradley KM, Smith JR, Southard-Smith EM
(2004) Hum Mol Genet 13: 2289-301
MeSH Terms: Animals, Crosses, Genetic, DNA-Binding Proteins, Endothelins, Enteric Nervous System, Genes, Dominant, High Mobility Group Proteins, Hirschsprung Disease, Mice, Mice, Congenic, Mice, Inbred C3H, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mutation, Pedigree, Receptor, Endothelin B, SOXE Transcription Factors, Severity of Illness Index, Signal Transduction, Transcription Factors
Show Abstract · Added March 20, 2014
Cumulative evidence suggests that Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) is the consequence of multiple gene interactions that modulate the ability of enteric neural crest (NC) cells to populate the developing gut. One of the essential genes for this process is the NC transcription factor Sox10. Sox10Dom mice on a mixed genetic background show variation in penetrance and expressivity of enteric aganglionosis that are analogous to the variable aganglionosis seen in human HSCR families. The phenotype of Sox10Dom mice in congenic lines indicates this variation arises from modifiers in the genetic background. To determine whether known HSCR susceptibility loci are acting as modifiers of Sox10, we tested for association between genes in the endothelin signaling pathway (EdnrB, Edn3, Ece1) and severity of aganglionosis in an extended pedigree of B6C3FeLe.Sox10Dom mice. Single locus association analysis in this pedigree identifies interaction between EdnrB and Sox10. Additional analysis of F2 intercross progeny confirms a highly significant effect of EdnrB alleles on the Sox10Dom/+ phenotype. The presence of C57BL/6J alleles at EdnrB is associated with increased penetrance and more severe aganglionosis in Sox10Dom mutants. Crosses between EdnrB and Sox10 mutants corroborate this gene interaction with double mutant progeny exhibiting significantly more severe aganglionosis. The background strain of the EdnrB mutant further influences the phenotype of Sox10/EdnrB double mutant progeny implying the action of additional modifiers on this phenotype. Our data demonstrates that Sox10-EdnrB interactions can influence development of the enteric nervous system in mouse models and suggests that this interaction could contribute to the epistatic network producing variation between patients with aganglionosis.
1 Communities
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19 MeSH Terms
The Sox10(Dom) mouse: modeling the genetic variation of Waardenburg-Shah (WS4) syndrome.
Southard-Smith EM, Angrist M, Ellison JS, Agarwala R, Baxevanis AD, Chakravarti A, Pavan WJ
(1999) Genome Res 9: 215-25
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Animals, Base Sequence, Crosses, Genetic, DNA-Binding Proteins, Disease Models, Animal, Female, Genes, Dominant, Genetic Variation, High Mobility Group Proteins, Hirschsprung Disease, Humans, Hypopigmentation, Male, Mice, Mice, Congenic, Mice, Inbred C3H, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Molecular Sequence Data, Rats, SOXE Transcription Factors, Syndrome, Transcription Factors
Show Abstract · Added February 25, 2015
Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) is a multigenic neurocristopathy clinically recognized by aganglionosis of the distal gastrointestinal tract. Patients presenting with aganglionosis in association with hypopigmentation are classified as Waardenburg syndrome type 4 (Waardenburg-Shah, WS4). Variability in the disease phenotype of WS4 patients with equivalent mutations suggests the influence of genetic modifier loci in this disorder. Sox10(Dom)/+ mice exhibit variability of aganglionosis and hypopigmentation influenced by genetic background similar to that observed in WS4 patients. We have constructed Sox10(Dom)/+ congenic lines to segregate loci that modify the neural crest defects in these mice. Consistent with previous studies, increased lethality of Sox10(Dom)/+ animals resulted from a C57BL/6J locus(i). However, we also observed an increase in hypopigmentation in conjunction with a C3HeB/FeJLe-a/a locus(i). Linkage analysis localized a hypopigmentation modifier of the Dom phenotype to mouse chromosome 10 in close proximity to a previously reported modifier of hypopigmentation for the endothelin receptor B mouse model of WS4. To evaluate further the role of SOX10 in development and disease, we have performed comparative genomic analyses. An essential role for this gene in neural crest development is supported by zoo blot hybridizations that reveal extensive conservation throughout vertebrate evolution and by similar Northern blot expression profiles between mouse and man. Comparative sequence analysis of the mouse and human SOX10 gene have defined the exon-intron boundaries of SOX10 and facilitated mutation analysis leading to the identification of two new SOX10 mutations in individuals with WS4. Structural analysis of the HMG DNA-binding domain was performed to evaluate the effect of human mutations in this region.
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23 MeSH Terms
Sox10 mutation disrupts neural crest development in Dom Hirschsprung mouse model.
Southard-Smith EM, Kos L, Pavan WJ
(1998) Nat Genet 18: 60-4
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Animals, Base Sequence, DNA, Complementary, DNA-Binding Proteins, Disease Models, Animal, Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental, High Mobility Group Proteins, Hirschsprung Disease, Mice, Mice, Inbred C3H, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Mutant Strains, Molecular Sequence Data, Mutation, Neural Crest, RNA, Messenger, SOXE Transcription Factors, Transcription Factors
Show Abstract · Added February 25, 2015
Hirschsprung disease (HSCR, MIM #142623) is a multigenic neurocristopathy (neural crest disorder) characterized by absence of enteric ganglia in a variable portion of the distal colon. Subsets of HSCR individuals also present with neural crest-derived melanocyte deficiencies (Hirschsprung-Waardenburg, HSCR-WS, MIM #277580). Murine models have been instrumental in the identification and analysis of HSCR disease genes. These include mice with deficiencies of endothelin B receptor (Ednrb(s-l); refs 1,2) endothelin 3 (Edn3(ls): refs 1,3) the tyrosine kinase receptor cRet and glial-derived neurotrophic factor. Another mouse model of HSCR disease, Dom, arose spontaneously at the Jackson Laboratory. While Dom/+ heterozygous mice display regional deficiencies of neural crest-derived enteric ganglia in the distal colon, Dom/Dom homozygous animals are embryonic lethal. We have determined that premature termination of Sox10, a member of the SRY-like HMG box family of transcription factors, is responsible for absence of the neural crest derivatives in Dom mice. We demonstrate expression of Sox10 in normal neural crest cells, disrupted expression of both Sox10 and the HSCR disease gene Ednrb in Dom mutant embryos, and loss of neural crest derivatives due to apoptosis. Our studies suggest that Sox10 is essential for proper peripheral nervous system development. We propose SOX10 as a candidate disease gene for individuals with HSCR whose disease does not have an identified genetic origin.
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19 MeSH Terms