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Registration-based image enhancement improves multi-atlas segmentation of the thalamic nuclei and hippocampal subfields.
Bao S, Bermudez C, Huo Y, Parvathaneni P, Rodriguez W, Resnick SM, D'Haese PF, McHugo M, Heckers S, Dawant BM, Lyu I, Landman BA
(2019) Magn Reson Imaging 59: 143-152
MeSH Terms: Algorithms, Brain Mapping, Hippocampus, Humans, Image Enhancement, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Temporal Lobe, Thalamic Nuclei
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an important tool for analysis of deep brain grey matter structures. However, analysis of these structures is limited due to low intensity contrast typically found in whole brain imaging protocols. Herein, we propose a big data registration-enhancement (BDRE) technique to augment the contrast of deep brain structures using an efficient large-scale non-rigid registration strategy. Direct validation is problematic given a lack of ground truth data. Rather, we validate the usefulness and impact of BDRE for multi-atlas (MA) segmentation on two sets of structures of clinical interest: the thalamic nuclei and hippocampal subfields. The experimental design compares algorithms using T1-weighted 3 T MRI for both structures (and additional 7 T MRI for the thalamic nuclei) with an algorithm using BDRE. As baseline comparisons, a recent denoising (DN) technique and a super-resolution (SR) method are used to preprocess the original 3 T MRI. The performance of each MA segmentation is evaluated by the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). BDRE significantly improves mean segmentation accuracy over all methods tested for both thalamic nuclei (3 T imaging: 9.1%; 7 T imaging: 15.6%; DN: 6.9%; SR: 16.2%) and hippocampal subfields (3 T T1 only: 8.7%; DN: 8.4%; SR: 8.6%). We also present DSC performance for each thalamic nucleus and hippocampal subfield and show that BDRE can help MA segmentation for individual thalamic nuclei and hippocampal subfields. This work will enable large-scale analysis of clinically relevant deep brain structures from commonly acquired T1 images.
Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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1 Members
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9 MeSH Terms
Regionally specific volume deficits along the hippocampal long axis in early and chronic psychosis.
McHugo M, Talati P, Woodward ND, Armstrong K, Blackford JU, Heckers S
(2018) Neuroimage Clin 20: 1106-1114
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Bipolar Disorder, Dentate Gyrus, Early Diagnosis, Female, Hippocampus, Humans, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Psychotic Disorders
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
Previous studies in psychosis patients have shown hippocampal volume deficits across anterior and posterior regions or across subfields, but subfield specific changes in volume along the hippocampal long axis have not been examined. Here, we tested the hypothesis that volume changes exist across the hippocampus in chronic psychosis but only the anterior CA region is affected in early psychosis patients. We analyzed structural MRI data from 179 patients with a non-affective psychotic disorder (94 chronic psychosis; 85 early psychosis) and 167 heathy individuals demographically matched to the chronic and early psychosis samples respectively (82 matched to chronic patients; 85 matched to early patients). We measured hippocampal volumes using Freesurfer 6-derived automated segmentation of both anterior and posterior regions and the CA, dentate gyrus, and subiculum subfields. We found a hippocampal volume deficit in both anterior and posterior regions in chronic psychosis, but this deficit was limited to the anterior hippocampus in early psychosis patients. This volume change was more pronounced in the anterior CA subfield of early psychosis patients than in the dentate gyrus or subiculum. Our findings support existing models of psychosis implicating initial CA dysfunction with later progression to other hippocampal regions and suggest that the anterior hippocampus may be an important target for early interventions.
Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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MeSH Terms
HCN channels in the hippocampus regulate active coping behavior.
Fisher DW, Han Y, Lyman KA, Heuermann RJ, Bean LA, Ybarra N, Foote KM, Dong H, Nicholson DA, Chetkovich DM
(2018) J Neurochem 146: 753-766
MeSH Terms: Adaptation, Psychological, Animals, Avoidance Learning, Depression, Disease Models, Animal, Exploratory Behavior, Hippocampus, Hyperpolarization-Activated Cyclic Nucleotide-Gated Channels, Male, Maze Learning, Membrane Proteins, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Transgenic, Microscopy, Electron, Peroxins, Pyramidal Cells, Swimming
Show Abstract · Added April 2, 2019
Active coping is an adaptive stress response that improves outcomes in medical and neuropsychiatric diseases. To date, most research into coping style has focused on neurotransmitter activity and little is known about the intrinsic excitability of neurons in the associated brain regions that facilitate coping. Previous studies have shown that HCN channels regulate neuronal excitability in pyramidal cells and that HCN channel current (I ) in the CA1 area increases with chronic mild stress. Reduction of I in the CA1 area leads to antidepressant-like behavior, and this region has been implicated in the regulation of coping style. We hypothesized that the antidepressant-like behavior achieved with CA1 knockdown of I is accompanied by increases in active coping. In this report, we found that global loss of TRIP8b, a necessary subunit for proper HCN channel localization in pyramidal cells, led to active coping behavior in numerous assays specific to coping style. We next employed a viral strategy using a dominant negative TRIP8b isoform to alter coping behavior by reducing HCN channel expression. This approach led to a robust reduction in I in CA1 pyramidal neurons and an increase in active coping. Together, these results establish that changes in HCN channel function in CA1 influences coping style.
© 2018 International Society for Neurochemistry.
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18 MeSH Terms
Hippocampal Network Modularity Is Associated With Relational Memory Dysfunction in Schizophrenia.
Avery SN, Rogers BP, Heckers S
(2018) Biol Psychiatry Cogn Neurosci Neuroimaging 3: 423-432
MeSH Terms: Adult, Brain Mapping, Female, Hippocampus, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Memory Disorders, Memory, Episodic, Middle Aged, Neural Pathways, Prefrontal Cortex, Schizophrenia, Temporal Lobe
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
BACKGROUND - Functional dysconnectivity has been proposed as a major pathophysiological mechanism for cognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia. The hippocampus is a focal point of dysconnectivity in schizophrenia, with decreased hippocampal functional connectivity contributing to the marked memory deficits observed in patients. Normal memory function relies on the interaction of complex corticohippocampal networks. However, only recent technological advances have enabled the large-scale exploration of functional networks with accuracy and precision.
METHODS - We investigated the modularity of hippocampal resting-state functional networks in a sample of 45 patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders and 38 healthy control subjects. Modularity was calculated for two distinct functional networks: a core hippocampal-medial temporal lobe cortex network and an extended hippocampal-cortical network. As hippocampal function differs along its longitudinal axis, follow-up analyses examined anterior and posterior networks separately. To explore effects of resting network function on behavior, we tested associations between modularity and relational memory ability. Age, sex, handedness, and parental education were similar between groups.
RESULTS - Network modularity was lower in schizophrenia patients, especially in the posterior hippocampal network. Schizophrenia patients also showed markedly lower relational memory ability compared with control subjects. We found a distinct brain-behavior relationship in schizophrenia that differed from control subjects by network and anterior/posterior division-while relational memory in control subjects was associated with anterior hippocampal-cortical modularity, schizophrenia patients showed an association with posterior hippocampal-medial temporal lobe cortex network modularity.
CONCLUSIONS - Our findings support a model of abnormal resting-state corticohippocampal network coherence in schizophrenia, which may contribute to relational memory deficits.
Copyright © 2018 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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14 MeSH Terms
Neuroinflammation Alters Integrative Properties of Rat Hippocampal Pyramidal Cells.
Frigerio F, Flynn C, Han Y, Lyman K, Lugo JN, Ravizza T, Ghestem A, Pitsch J, Becker A, Anderson AE, Vezzani A, Chetkovich D, Bernard C
(2018) Mol Neurobiol 55: 7500-7511
MeSH Terms: Animals, Dendrites, Down-Regulation, Hippocampus, Hyperpolarization-Activated Cyclic Nucleotide-Gated Channels, Inflammation, Lipopolysaccharides, Male, Membrane Proteins, Microglia, Potassium Channels, Pyramidal Cells, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Time Factors, Toll-Like Receptor 4
Show Abstract · Added April 2, 2019
Neuroinflammation is consistently found in many neurological disorders, but whether or not the inflammatory response independently affects neuronal network properties is poorly understood. Here, we report that intracerebroventricular injection of the prototypical inflammatory molecule lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in rats triggered a strong and long-lasting inflammatory response in hippocampal microglia associated with a concomitant upregulation of Toll-like receptor (TLR4) in pyramidal and hilar neurons. This, in turn, was associated with a significant reduction of the dendritic hyperpolarization-activated cyclic AMP-gated channel type 1 (HCN1) protein level while Kv4.2 channels were unaltered as assessed by western blot. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the HCN1 decrease in CA1 pyramidal neurons and showed that these changes were associated with a reduction of TRIP8b, an auxiliary subunit for HCN channels implicated in channel subcellular localization and trafficking. At the physiological level, this effect translated into a 50% decrease in HCN1-mediated currents (I) measured in the distal dendrites of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells. At the functional level, the band-pass-filtering properties of dendrites in the theta frequency range (4-12 Hz) and their temporal summation properties were compromised. We conclude that neuroinflammation can independently trigger an acquired channelopathy in CA1 pyramidal cell dendrites that alters their integrative properties. By directly changing cellular function, this phenomenon may participate in the phenotypic expression of various brain diseases.
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MeSH Terms
Memory decline from hippocampal electrodes? Let's not forget statistics and study design.
Englot DJ, Rolston JD
(2018) Epilepsia 59: 502-503
MeSH Terms: Electrodes, Hippocampus, Memory, Research Design, Temporal Lobe
Added September 25, 2018
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1 Members
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5 MeSH Terms
A novel mechanism for Ca/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II targeting to L-type Ca channels that initiates long-range signaling to the nucleus.
Wang X, Marks CR, Perfitt TL, Nakagawa T, Lee A, Jacobson DA, Colbran RJ
(2017) J Biol Chem 292: 17324-17336
MeSH Terms: Animals, Calcium Channels, Calcium-Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Type 2, Cell Nucleus, Female, Hippocampus, Learning, Memory, Neurons, Protein Domains, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added November 13, 2017
Neuronal excitation can induce new mRNA transcription, a phenomenon called excitation-transcription (E-T) coupling. Among several pathways implicated in E-T coupling, activation of voltage-gated L-type Ca channels (LTCCs) in the plasma membrane can initiate a signaling pathway that ultimately increases nuclear CREB phosphorylation and, in most cases, expression of immediate early genes. Initiation of this long-range pathway has been shown to require recruitment of Ca-sensitive enzymes to a nanodomain in the immediate vicinity of the LTCC by an unknown mechanism. Here, we show that activated Ca/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) strongly interacts with a novel binding motif in the N-terminal domain of Ca1 LTCC α1 subunits that is not conserved in Ca2 or Ca3 voltage-gated Ca channel subunits. Mutations in the Ca1.3 α1 subunit N-terminal domain or in the CaMKII catalytic domain that largely prevent the interaction also disrupt CaMKII association with intact LTCC complexes isolated by immunoprecipitation. Furthermore, these same mutations interfere with E-T coupling in cultured hippocampal neurons. Taken together, our findings define a novel molecular interaction with the neuronal LTCC that is required for the initiation of a long-range signal to the nucleus that is critical for learning and memory.
© 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.
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3 Members
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13 MeSH Terms
Co-Activation of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 3 and Beta-Adrenergic Receptors Modulates Cyclic-AMP and Long-Term Potentiation, and Disrupts Memory Reconsolidation.
Walker AG, Sheffler DJ, Lewis AS, Dickerson JW, Foster DJ, Senter RK, Moehle MS, Lv X, Stansley BJ, Xiang Z, Rook JM, Emmitte KA, Lindsley CW, Conn PJ
(2017) Neuropsychopharmacology 42: 2553-2566
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cerebral Cortex, Conditioning (Psychology), Cyclic AMP, Hippocampus, Long-Term Potentiation, Male, Memory Consolidation, Mice, Inbred ICR, Mice, Knockout, Neurotransmitter Agents, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Receptors, Adrenergic, beta, Receptors, Metabotropic Glutamate, Tissue Culture Techniques
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2018
Activation of β-adrenergic receptors (βARs) enhances both the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells and hippocampal-dependent cognitive function. Interestingly, previous studies reveal that coincident activation of group II metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors with βARs in the hippocampal astrocytes induces a large increase in cyclic-AMP (cAMP) accumulation and release of adenosine. Adenosine then acts on A adenosine receptors at neighboring excitatory Schaffer collateral terminals, which could counteract effects of activation of neuronal βARs on excitatory transmission. On the basis of this, we postulated that activation of the specific mGlu receptor subtype that mediates this response could inhibit βAR-mediated effects on hippocampal synaptic plasticity and cognitive function. Using novel mGlu receptor subtype-selective allosteric modulators along with knockout mice we now report that the effects of mGlu agonists on βAR-mediated increases in cAMP accumulation are exclusively mediated by mGlu. Furthermore, mGlu activation inhibits the ability of the βAR agonist isoproterenol to enhance hippocampal LTP, and this effect is absent in slices treated with either a glial toxin or an adenosine A receptor antagonist. Finally, systemic administration of the mGlu agonist LY379268 disrupted contextual fear memory in a manner similar to the effect of the βAR antagonist propranolol, and this effect was reversed by the mGlu-negative allosteric modulator VU0650786. Taken together, these data suggest that mGlu can influence astrocytic signaling and modulate βAR-mediated effects on hippocampal synaptic plasticity and cognitive function.
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1 Members
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15 MeSH Terms
Estrogen enhances hippocampal gray-matter volume in young and older postmenopausal women: a prospective dose-response study.
Albert K, Hiscox J, Boyd B, Dumas J, Taylor W, Newhouse P
(2017) Neurobiol Aging 56: 1-6
MeSH Terms: Cognition, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Estradiol, Female, Gray Matter, Hippocampus, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Middle Aged, Neuroimaging, Organ Size, Postmenopause
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Estrogen administration following menopause has been shown to support hippocampally mediated cognitive processes. A number of previous studies have examined the effect of estrogen on hippocampal structure to determine the mechanism underlying estrogen effects on hippocampal function. However, these studies have been largely observational and provided inconsistent results. We examined the effect of short-term estradiol administration on hippocampal gray-matter volume in a prospective study with multiple doses of estradiol (placebo, 1 mg, and 2 mg). Following 3 months of estradiol administration, bilateral posterior hippocampal voxel-based gray-matter volume was increased in women who received 2-mg estradiol. There were no significant differences in total hippocampal volume and no significant effects on gray-matter volume in women who received placebo or 1-mg estradiol. These findings accord with previous animal studies and provide evidence of estrogen effects on hippocampal morphology that may represent a neurobiological mechanism for estrogen effects on cognition in postmenopausal women.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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1 Members
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12 MeSH Terms
Endocannabinoid signalling modulates susceptibility to traumatic stress exposure.
Bluett RJ, Báldi R, Haymer A, Gaulden AD, Hartley ND, Parrish WP, Baechle J, Marcus DJ, Mardam-Bey R, Shonesy BC, Uddin MJ, Marnett LJ, Mackie K, Colbran RJ, Winder DG, Patel S
(2017) Nat Commun 8: 14782
MeSH Terms: Amygdala, Animals, Anxiety, Arachidonic Acids, Behavior, Animal, Benzodioxoles, Disease Susceptibility, Dronabinol, Endocannabinoids, Excitatory Postsynaptic Potentials, Female, Glutamates, Glycerides, Hippocampus, Lipoprotein Lipase, Male, Mice, Inbred ICR, Mice, Knockout, Phenotype, Piperidines, Resilience, Psychological, Signal Transduction, Stress, Psychological, Synapses
Show Abstract · Added April 7, 2017
Stress is a ubiquitous risk factor for the exacerbation and development of affective disorders including major depression and posttraumatic stress disorder. Understanding the neurobiological mechanisms conferring resilience to the adverse consequences of stress could have broad implications for the treatment and prevention of mood and anxiety disorders. We utilize laboratory mice and their innate inter-individual differences in stress-susceptibility to demonstrate a critical role for the endogenous cannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) in stress-resilience. Specifically, systemic 2-AG augmentation is associated with a stress-resilient phenotype and enhances resilience in previously susceptible mice, while systemic 2-AG depletion or CB1 receptor blockade increases susceptibility in previously resilient mice. Moreover, stress-resilience is associated with increased phasic 2-AG-mediated synaptic suppression at ventral hippocampal-amygdala glutamatergic synapses and amygdala-specific 2-AG depletion impairs successful adaptation to repeated stress. These data indicate amygdala 2-AG signalling mechanisms promote resilience to adverse effects of acute traumatic stress and facilitate adaptation to repeated stress exposure.
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4 Members
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24 MeSH Terms