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A Unilateral Facial Rash with Eye Involvement.
Buell KG, Trumbo SP, Haase VH
(2019) Am J Med 132: 823-825
MeSH Terms: Aged, Diagnosis, Differential, Exanthema, Face, Herpes Zoster, Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus, Humans, Male
Added March 9, 2019
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8 MeSH Terms
Reply.
Stone CA, Hemler JA, Commins SP, Schuyler AJ, Phillips EJ, Peebles RS, Fahrenholz JM
(2018) J Allergy Clin Immunol 141: 1957-1958
MeSH Terms: Anaphylaxis, Herpes Zoster Vaccine, Humans
Added March 30, 2020
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MeSH Terms
Anaphylaxis after zoster vaccine: Implicating alpha-gal allergy as a possible mechanism.
Stone CA, Hemler JA, Commins SP, Schuyler AJ, Phillips EJ, Peebles RS, Fahrenholz JM
(2017) J Allergy Clin Immunol 139: 1710-1713.e2
MeSH Terms: Allergens, Anaphylaxis, Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions, Emergency Medical Services, Epinephrine, Excipients, Female, Galactose, Gelatin, Herpes Zoster Vaccine, Humans, Hypersensitivity, Immunity, Heterologous, Immunoglobulin E, Middle Aged
Added March 30, 2020
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Genetic variation in the HLA region is associated with susceptibility to herpes zoster.
Crosslin DR, Carrell DS, Burt A, Kim DS, Underwood JG, Hanna DS, Comstock BA, Baldwin E, de Andrade M, Kullo IJ, Tromp G, Kuivaniemi H, Borthwick KM, McCarty CA, Peissig PL, Doheny KF, Pugh E, Kho A, Pacheco J, Hayes MG, Ritchie MD, Verma SS, Armstrong G, Stallings S, Denny JC, Carroll RJ, Crawford DC, Crane PK, Mukherjee S, Bottinger E, Li R, Keating B, Mirel DB, Carlson CS, Harley JB, Larson EB, Jarvik GP
(2015) Genes Immun 16: 1-7
MeSH Terms: Age of Onset, Aged, Algorithms, Cohort Studies, Electronic Health Records, Female, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genome-Wide Association Study, Herpes Zoster, Herpesvirus 3, Human, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, RNA, Long Noncoding, RNA, Untranslated, Retrospective Studies, United States
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Herpes zoster, commonly referred to as shingles, is caused by the varicella zoster virus (VZV). VZV initially manifests as chicken pox, most commonly in childhood, can remain asymptomatically latent in nerve tissues for many years and often re-emerges as shingles. Although reactivation may be related to immune suppression, aging and female sex, most inter-individual variability in re-emergence risk has not been explained to date. We performed a genome-wide association analyses in 22,981 participants (2280 shingles cases) from the electronic Medical Records and Genomics Network. Using Cox survival and logistic regression, we identified a genomic region in the combined and European ancestry groups that has an age of onset effect reaching genome-wide significance (P>1.0 × 10(-8)). This region tags the non-coding gene HCP5 (HLA Complex P5) in the major histocompatibility complex. This gene is an endogenous retrovirus and likely influences viral activity through regulatory functions. Variants in this genetic region are known to be associated with delay in development of AIDS in people infected by HIV. Our study provides further suggestion that this region may have a critical role in viral suppression and could potentially harbor a clinically actionable variant for the shingles vaccine.
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Safety of zoster vaccine in elderly adults following documented herpes zoster.
Morrison VA, Oxman MN, Levin MJ, Schmader KE, Guatelli JC, Betts RF, Gelb LD, Pachucki CT, Keay SK, Menzies B, Griffin MR, Kauffman CA, Marques AR, Toney JF, Simberkoff MS, Serrao R, Arbeit RD, Gnann JW, Greenberg RN, Holodniy M, Keitel WA, Yeh SS, Davis LE, Crawford GE, Neuzil KM, Johnson GR, Zhang JH, Harbecke R, Chan IS, Keller PM, Williams HM, Boardman KD, Silber JL, Annunziato PW, Shingles Prevention Study Group
(2013) J Infect Dis 208: 559-63
MeSH Terms: Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions, Female, Herpes Zoster, Herpes Zoster Vaccine, Humans, Male, Middle Aged
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
BACKGROUND - After completion of the Shingles Prevention Study (SPS; Department of Veterans Affairs Cooperative Studies Program Number 403), SPS participants who had initially received placebo were offered investigational zoster vaccine without charge. This provided an opportunity to determine the relative safety of zoster vaccine in older adults following documented herpes zoster (HZ).
METHODS - A total of 13 681 SPS placebo recipients who elected to receive zoster vaccine were followed for serious adverse events (SAE) for 28 days after vaccination. In contrast to the SPS, a prior episode of HZ was not a contraindication to receiving zoster vaccine. The SPS placebo recipients who received zoster vaccine included 420 who had developed documented HZ during the SPS.
RESULTS - The mean interval between the onset of HZ and the receipt of zoster vaccine in the 420 recipients with prior HZ was 3.61 years (median interval, 3.77 years [range, 3-85 months]); the interval was <5 years for approximately 80% of recipients. The proportion of vaccinated SPS placebo recipients with prior HZ who developed ≥ 1 SAE (0.95%) was not significantly different from that of vaccinated SPS placebo recipients with no prior history of HZ (0.66%), and the distribution of SAEs in the 2 groups was comparable.
CONCLUSIONS - These results demonstrate that the general safety of zoster vaccine in older persons is not altered by a recent history of documented HZ, supporting the safety aspect of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommendation to administer zoster vaccine to all persons ≥ 60 years of age with no contraindications, regardless of a prior history of HZ.
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Association between the initiation of anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy and the risk of herpes zoster.
Winthrop KL, Baddley JW, Chen L, Liu L, Grijalva CG, Delzell E, Beukelman T, Patkar NM, Xie F, Saag KG, Herrinton LJ, Solomon DH, Lewis JD, Curtis JR
(2013) JAMA 309: 887-95
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Antirheumatic Agents, Arthritis, Rheumatoid, Autoimmune Diseases, Case-Control Studies, Cohort Studies, Databases, Factual, Female, Herpes Zoster, Humans, Immunocompromised Host, Incidence, Male, Middle Aged, Retrospective Studies, Risk, Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha, United States
Show Abstract · Added July 27, 2018
IMPORTANCE - Herpes zoster reactivation disproportionately affects patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). It is unclear whether anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) therapy elevates herpes zoster risk.
OBJECTIVES - To ascertain whether initiation of anti-TNF therapy compared with nonbiologic comparators is associated with increased herpes zoster risk.
DESIGN, SETTING, AND PATIENTS - We identified new users of anti-TNF therapy among cohorts of patients with RA, inflammatory bowel disease, and psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, or ankylosing spondylitis from 1998 through 2007 within a large US multi-institutional collaboration combining data from Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Pharmaceutical Assistance Contract for the Elderly, Tennessee Medicaid, and national Medicaid/Medicare programs. We compared herpes zoster incidence between new anti-TNF users (n=33,324) and patients initiating nonbiologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) (n=25,742) within each inflammatory disease cohort (last participant follow-up December 31, 2007). Within these cohorts, we used Cox regression models to compare propensity score-adjusted herpes zoster incidence between new anti-TNF and nonbiologic DMARD users while controlling for baseline corticosteroid use.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES - Incidence of herpes zoster cases occurring after initiation of new anti-TNF or nonbiologic DMARD therapy.
RESULTS - Among 33,324 new users of anti-TNF therapy, we identified 310 herpes zoster cases. Crude incidence rates among anti-TNF users were 12.1 per 1000 patient-years (95% CI, 10.7-13.6) for RA, 11.3 per 1000 patient-years (95% CI, 7.7-16.7) for inflammatory bowel disease, and 4.4 per 1000 patient-years (95% CI, 2.8-7.0) for psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, or ankylosing spondylitis. Baseline use of corticosteroids of 10 mg/d or greater among all disease indications was associated with elevated risk (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 2.13 [95% CI, 1.64-2.75]) compared with no baseline use. For patients with RA, adjusted incidence rates were similar between anti-TNF and nonbiologic DMARD initiators (adjusted HR, 1.00 [95% CI, 0.77-1.29]) and comparable between all 3 anti-TNF therapies studied. Across all disease indications, the adjusted HR was 1.09 (95% CI, 0.88-1.36).
CONCLUSION AND RELEVANCE - Among patients with RA and other inflammatory diseases, those who initiated anti-TNF therapies were not at higher risk of herpes zoster compared with patients who initiated nonbiologic treatment regimens.
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Brief report: incidence of selected opportunistic infections among children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.
Beukelman T, Xie F, Baddley JW, Chen L, Delzell E, Grijalva CG, Mannion ML, Patkar NM, Saag KG, Winthrop KL, Curtis JR, SABER Collaboration
(2013) Arthritis Rheum 65: 1384-9
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Antirheumatic Agents, Arthritis, Juvenile, Child, Coccidiosis, Cohort Studies, Comorbidity, Databases, Factual, Female, Herpes Zoster, Humans, Immunosuppressive Agents, Incidence, Male, Opportunistic Infections, Salmonella Infections, United States
Show Abstract · Added July 27, 2018
OBJECTIVE - To compare incidence rates of selected opportunistic infections among children with and children without juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA).
METHODS - Using U.S. national Medicaid administrative claims data from 2000 through 2005, we identified a cohort of children with JIA based on physician diagnosis codes and dispensed medications. We also identified a non-JIA comparator cohort of children diagnosed as having attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We defined 15 types of opportunistic infection using physician diagnosis or hospital discharge codes; criteria for 7 of these types also included evidence of treatment with specific antimicrobial agents. We calculated infection incidence rates. The rates in the ADHD comparator cohort were standardized to the age, sex, and race distribution of the JIA cohort. We calculated incidence rate ratios (IRRs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) to compare infection rates.
RESULTS - The JIA cohort included 8,503 children with 13,990 person-years of followup. The ADHD comparator cohort included 360,362 children with 477,050 person-years of followup. When all opportunistic infections were considered together as a single outcome, there were 42 infections in the JIA cohort (incidence rate 300 per 100,000 person-years; IRR 2.4 [95% CI 1.7-3.3] versus ADHD). The most common opportunistic infections among children with JIA were 3 cases of Coccidioides (incidence rate 21 per 100,000 person-years; IRR 101 [95% CI 8.1-5,319] versus ADHD), 5 cases of Salmonella (incidence rate 35 per 100,000 person-years; IRR 3.8 [95% CI 1.2-9.5]), and 32 cases of herpes zoster (incidence rate 225 per 100,000 person-years; IRR 2.1 [95% CI 1.4-3.0]).
CONCLUSION - Opportunistic infections are rare among children with JIA. Nevertheless, children with JIA had a higher rate of opportunistic infections, including an increased rate of Coccidioides, Salmonella, and herpes zoster compared to children with ADHD.
Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Rheumatology.
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Effect of a zoster vaccine on herpes zoster-related interference with functional status and health-related quality-of-life measures in older adults.
Schmader KE, Johnson GR, Saddier P, Ciarleglio M, Wang WW, Zhang JH, Chan IS, Yeh SS, Levin MJ, Harbecke RM, Oxman MN, Shingles Prevention Study Group
(2010) J Am Geriatr Soc 58: 1634-41
MeSH Terms: Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Double-Blind Method, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Herpes Zoster, Herpes Zoster Vaccine, Humans, Male, Mental Health, Middle Aged, Motor Activity, Pain, Pain Measurement, Prognosis, Prospective Studies, Quality of Life, Surveys and Questionnaires, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
OBJECTIVE - To determine the efficacy of a zoster vaccine on herpes zoster (HR)-related interference with activities of daily living (ADLs) and health-related quality of life (HRQL).
DESIGN - Randomized double-blind placebo controlled trial.
SETTING - Twenty-two U.S. sites.
PARTICIPANTS - Thirty eight thousand five hundred forty-six women and men aged 60 and olcer.
MEASUREMENTS - HZ burden of interference with ADLs and HRQL using ratings from the Zoster Brief Pain Inventory (ZBPI) and Medical Outcomes Study 12-item Short Form Survey (SF-12) mental component summary (MCS) and physical component summary (PCS) scores. Vaccine efficacy was calculated for the modified-intention-to-treat trial population and solely in participants who developed HZ.
RESULTS - For the modified-intention-to-treat population, the overall zoster vaccine efficacy was 66% (95% confidence interval (CI)=55-74%) for ZBPI ADL burden of interference score and 55% (95% CI=48-61%) for both the SF-12 MCS and PCS scores. Of participants who developed HZ, zoster vaccine reduced the ZBPI ADL burden of interference score by 31% (95% CI=12-51%) and did not significantly reduce the effect on HRQL.
CONCLUSIONS - Zoster vaccine reduced the burden of HZ-related interference with ADLs in the population of vaccinees and in vaccinees who developed HZ. Zoster vaccine reduced the effect of HZ on HRQL in the population of vaccinees but not in vaccinees who developed HZ.
© 2010, Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2010, The American Geriatrics Society.
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19 MeSH Terms