, a bio/informatics shared resource is still "open for business" - Visit the CDS website


Other search tools

About this data

The publication data currently available has been vetted by Vanderbilt faculty, staff, administrators and trainees. The data itself is retrieved directly from NCBI's PubMed and is automatically updated on a weekly basis to ensure accuracy and completeness.

If you have any questions or comments, please contact us.

Results: 1 to 10 of 13

Publication Record

Connections

Epithelial Heparan Sulfate Contributes to Alveolar Barrier Function and Is Shed during Lung Injury.
Haeger SM, Liu X, Han X, McNeil JB, Oshima K, McMurtry SA, Yang Y, Ouyang Y, Zhang F, Nozik-Grayck E, Zemans RL, Tuder RM, Bastarache JA, Linhardt RJ, Schmidt EP
(2018) Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol 59: 363-374
MeSH Terms: Animals, Capillary Permeability, Endothelium, Vascular, Glycocalyx, Heparitin Sulfate, Lipopolysaccharides, Lung Injury, Mice, Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult, Syndecans
Show Abstract · Added May 31, 2018
The lung epithelial glycocalyx is a carbohydrate-enriched layer lining the pulmonary epithelial surface. Although epithelial glycocalyx visualization has been reported, its composition and function remain unknown. Using immunofluorescence and mass spectrometry, we identified heparan sulfate (HS) and chondroitin sulfate within the lung epithelial glycocalyx. In vivo selective enzymatic degradation of epithelial HS, but not chondroitin sulfate, increased lung permeability. Using mass spectrometry and gel electrophoresis approaches to determine the fate of epithelial HS during lung injury, we detected shedding of 20 saccharide-long or greater HS into BAL fluid in intratracheal LPS-treated mice. Furthermore, airspace HS in clinical samples from patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome correlated with indices of alveolar permeability, reflecting the clinical relevance of these findings. The length of HS shed during intratracheal LPS-induced injury (≥20 saccharides) suggests cleavage of the proteoglycan anchoring HS to the epithelial surface, rather than cleavage of HS itself. We used pharmacologic and transgenic animal approaches to determine that matrix metalloproteinases partially mediate HS shedding during intratracheal LPS-induced lung injury. Although there was a trend toward decreased alveolar permeability after treatment with the matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor, doxycycline, this did not reach statistical significance. These studies suggest that epithelial HS contributes to the lung epithelial barrier and its degradation is sufficient to increase lung permeability. The partial reduction of HS shedding achieved with doxycycline is not sufficient to rescue epithelial barrier function during intratracheal LPS-induced lung injury; however, whether complete attenuation of HS shedding is sufficient to rescue epithelial barrier function remains unknown.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
10 MeSH Terms
Glomerular basement membrane heparan sulfate in health and disease: A regulator of local complement activation.
Borza DB
(2017) Matrix Biol 57-58: 299-310
MeSH Terms: Agrin, Animals, Collagen Type IV, Complement Activation, Complement C3b, Complement Factor H, Gene Expression Regulation, Glomerular Basement Membrane, Glomerulonephritis, Membranous, Heparitin Sulfate, Humans, Laminin, Lupus Nephritis, Membrane Glycoproteins, Signal Transduction, Static Electricity
Show Abstract · Added December 2, 2016
The glomerular basement membrane (GBM) is an essential component of the glomerular filtration barrier. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans such as agrin are major components of the GBM, along with α345(IV) collagen, laminin-521 and nidogen. A loss of GBM heparan sulfate chains is associated with proteinuria in several glomerular diseases and may contribute to the underlying pathology. As the major determinants of the anionic charge of the GBM, heparan sulfate chains have been thought to impart charge selectivity to the glomerular filtration, a view challenged by the negligible albuminuria in mice that lack heparan sulfate in the GBM. Recent studies provide increasing evidence that heparan sulfate chains modulate local complement activation by recruiting complement regulatory protein factor H, the major inhibitor of the alternative pathway in plasma. Factor H selectively inactivates C3b bound to surfaces bearing host-specific polyanions such as heparan sulfate, thus limiting complement activation on self surfaces such as the GBM, which are not protected by cell-bound complement regulators. We discuss mechanisms whereby the acquired loss of GBM heparan sulfate can impair the local regulation of the alternative pathway, exacerbating complement activation and glomerular injury in immune-mediated kidney diseases such as membranous nephropathy and lupus nephritis.
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
1 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
16 MeSH Terms
Murine models in the evaluation of heparan sulfate-based anticoagulants.
Gailani D, Cheng Q, Ivanov IS
(2015) Methods Mol Biol 1229: 483-96
MeSH Terms: Animals, Anticoagulants, Chlorides, Disease Models, Animal, Ferric Compounds, Hemorrhage, Heparitin Sulfate, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Tail, Thrombosis, Vena Cava, Inferior
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
Evaluating anticoagulants in animal thrombosis models is a standard component of preclinical drug testing. Mice are frequently used for these initial evaluations because a variety of thrombosis models have been developed and are well characterized in this species, and the animals are relatively inexpensive to maintain. Because mice have a natural resistance to forming intravascular thrombi, vessel injury is required to induce intravascular clot formation. Several methods have been established for inducing arterial or venous thrombosis in mice. For the purpose of testing heparin-based drugs, we adapted a well-established model in which thrombus formation in the carotid artery is induced by exposing the vessel to ferric chloride. For studying anticoagulant effects on venous thrombosis, we use a model in which the inferior vena cava is ligated and the size of the resulting clots is measured. The most common adverse effect of anticoagulation therapy is bleeding. The effect of heparin-based anticoagulants can be tested in mice in a simple tail bleeding assay.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
11 MeSH Terms
Epidermal growth factor receptor plays a role in the regulation of liver and plasma lipid levels in adult male mice.
Scheving LA, Zhang X, Garcia OA, Wang RF, Stevenson MC, Threadgill DW, Russell WE
(2014) Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol 306: G370-81
MeSH Terms: Adipose Tissue, Alleles, Animals, Chondroitin Sulfates, Dermatan Sulfate, ErbB Receptors, Female, Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental, Heparitin Sulfate, Kidney, Lipid Metabolism, Lipids, Liver, Male, Mice, Sarcoma, Small Cell, Signal Transduction, Spleen, Testis
Show Abstract · Added March 24, 2014
Dsk5 mice have a gain of function in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), caused by a point mutation in the kinase domain. We analyzed the effect of this mutation on liver size, histology, and composition. We found that the livers of 12-wk-old male Dsk5 heterozygotes (+/Dsk5) were 62% heavier compared with those of wild-type controls (+/+). The livers of the +/Dsk5 mice compared with +/+ mice had larger hepatocytes with prominent, polyploid nuclei and showed modestly increased cell proliferation indices in both hepatocytes and nonparenchymal cells. An analysis of total protein, DNA, and RNA (expressed relative to liver weight) revealed no differences between the mutant and wild-type mice. However, the livers of the +/Dsk5 mice had more cholesterol but less phospholipid and fatty acid. Circulating cholesterol levels were twice as high in adult male +/Dsk5 mice but not in postweaned young male or female mice. The elevated total plasma cholesterol resulted mainly from an increase in low-density lipoprotein (LDL). The +/Dsk5 adult mouse liver expressed markedly reduced protein levels of LDL receptor, no change in proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9, and a markedly increased fatty acid synthase and 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase. Increased expression of transcription factors associated with enhanced cholesterol synthesis was also observed. Together, these findings suggest that the EGFR may play a regulatory role in hepatocyte proliferation and lipid metabolism in adult male mice, explaining why elevated levels of EGF or EGF-like peptides have been positively correlated to increased cholesterol levels in human studies.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
19 MeSH Terms
A single-amino-acid polymorphism in Chikungunya virus E2 glycoprotein influences glycosaminoglycan utilization.
Silva LA, Khomandiak S, Ashbrook AW, Weller R, Heise MT, Morrison TE, Dermody TS
(2014) J Virol 88: 2385-97
MeSH Terms: Alphavirus Infections, Amino Acid Substitution, Animals, CHO Cells, Chikungunya Fever, Chikungunya virus, Chlorocebus aethiops, Cricetinae, Cricetulus, Endosomes, Genotype, Glycosaminoglycans, Heparitin Sulfate, Humans, Hydrogen Bonding, Kinetics, Models, Molecular, Mutation, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Protein Multimerization, Static Electricity, Vero Cells, Viral Envelope Proteins, Virus Attachment, Virus Internalization, Virus Replication
Show Abstract · Added May 20, 2014
UNLABELLED - Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a reemerging arbovirus responsible for outbreaks of infection throughout Asia and Africa, causing an acute illness characterized by fever, rash, and polyarthralgia. Although CHIKV infects a broad range of host cells, little is known about how CHIKV binds and gains access to the target cell interior. In this study, we tested whether glycosaminoglycan (GAG) binding is required for efficient CHIKV replication using CHIKV vaccine strain 181/25 and clinical isolate SL15649. Preincubation of strain 181/25, but not SL15649, with soluble GAGs resulted in dose-dependent inhibition of infection. While parental Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are permissive for both strains, neither strain efficiently bound to or infected mutant CHO cells devoid of GAG expression. Although GAGs appear to be required for efficient binding of both strains, they exhibit differential requirements for GAGs, as SL15649 readily infected cells that express excess chondroitin sulfate but that are devoid of heparan sulfate, whereas 181/25 did not. We generated a panel of 181/25 and SL15649 variants containing reciprocal amino acid substitutions at positions 82 and 318 in the E2 glycoprotein. Reciprocal exchange at residue 82 resulted in a phenotype switch; Gly(82) results in efficient infection of mutant CHO cells but a decrease in heparin binding, whereas Arg(82) results in reduced infectivity of mutant cells and an increase in heparin binding. These results suggest that E2 residue 82 is a primary determinant of GAG utilization, which likely mediates attenuation of vaccine strain 181/25.
IMPORTANCE - Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infection causes a debilitating rheumatic disease that can persist for months to years, and yet there are no licensed vaccines or antiviral therapies. Like other alphaviruses, CHIKV displays broad tissue tropism, which is thought to be influenced by virus-receptor interactions. In this study, we determined that cell-surface glycosaminoglycans are utilized by both a vaccine strain and a clinical isolate of CHIKV to mediate virus binding. We also identified an amino acid polymorphism in the viral E2 attachment protein that influences utilization of glycosaminoglycans. These data enhance an understanding of the viral and host determinants of CHIKV cell entry, which may foster development of new antivirals that act by blocking this key step in viral infection.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
26 MeSH Terms
Stable RAGE-heparan sulfate complexes are essential for signal transduction.
Xu D, Young JH, Krahn JM, Song D, Corbett KD, Chazin WJ, Pedersen LC, Esko JD
(2013) ACS Chem Biol 8: 1611-20
MeSH Terms: Coordination Complexes, Dimerization, Drug Stability, Endothelial Cells, Heparitin Sulfate, Humans, Models, Molecular, Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products, Signal Transduction, X-Ray Diffraction
Show Abstract · Added March 7, 2014
RAGE (Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-Products) has emerged as a major receptor that mediates vascular inflammation. Signaling through RAGE by damage-associated molecular pattern molecules often leads to uncontrolled inflammation that exacerbates the impact of the underlying disease. Oligomerization of RAGE is believed to play an essential role in signal transduction, but the molecular mechanism of oligomerization remains elusive. Here we report that RAGE activation of Erk1/2 phosphorylation on endothelial cells in response to a number of ligands depends on a mechanism that involves heparan sulfate-induced hexamerization of the RAGE extracellular domain. Structural studies of the extracellular V-C1 domain-dodecasaccharide complex by X-ray diffraction and small-angle X-ray scattering revealed that the hexamer consists of a trimer of dimers, with a stoichiometry of 2:1 RAGE:dodecasaccharide. Mutagenesis studies mapped the heparan sulfate binding site and the interfacial surface between the monomers and demonstrated that electrostatic interactions with heparan sulfate and intermonomer hydrophobic interactions work in concert to stabilize the dimer. The importance of oligomerization was demonstrated by inhibition of signaling with a new epitope-defined monoclonal antibody that specifically targets oligomerization. These findings indicate that RAGE-heparan sulfate oligomeric complexes are essential for signaling and that interfering with RAGE oligomerization might be of therapeutic value.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
10 MeSH Terms
A targeted glycan-related gene screen reveals heparan sulfate proteoglycan sulfation regulates WNT and BMP trans-synaptic signaling.
Dani N, Nahm M, Lee S, Broadie K
(2012) PLoS Genet 8: e1003031
MeSH Terms: Animals, Animals, Genetically Modified, Bone Morphogenetic Proteins, Drosophila Proteins, Drosophila melanogaster, Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental, Genetic Therapy, Heparitin Sulfate, Polysaccharides, Proteoglycans, Signal Transduction, Sulfatases, Sulfotransferases, Synapses, Synaptic Transmission, Wnt Signaling Pathway
Show Abstract · Added March 29, 2017
A Drosophila transgenic RNAi screen targeting the glycan genome, including all N/O/GAG-glycan biosynthesis/modification enzymes and glycan-binding lectins, was conducted to discover novel glycan functions in synaptogenesis. As proof-of-product, we characterized functionally paired heparan sulfate (HS) 6-O-sulfotransferase (hs6st) and sulfatase (sulf1), which bidirectionally control HS proteoglycan (HSPG) sulfation. RNAi knockdown of hs6st and sulf1 causes opposite effects on functional synapse development, with decreased (hs6st) and increased (sulf1) neurotransmission strength confirmed in null mutants. HSPG co-receptors for WNT and BMP intercellular signaling, Dally-like Protein and Syndecan, are differentially misregulated in the synaptomatrix of these mutants. Consistently, hs6st and sulf1 nulls differentially elevate both WNT (Wingless; Wg) and BMP (Glass Bottom Boat; Gbb) ligand abundance in the synaptomatrix. Anterograde Wg signaling via Wg receptor dFrizzled2 C-terminus nuclear import and retrograde Gbb signaling via synaptic MAD phosphorylation and nuclear import are differentially activated in hs6st and sulf1 mutants. Consequently, transcriptional control of presynaptic glutamate release machinery and postsynaptic glutamate receptors is bidirectionally altered in hs6st and sulf1 mutants, explaining the bidirectional change in synaptic functional strength. Genetic correction of the altered WNT/BMP signaling restores normal synaptic development in both mutant conditions, proving that altered trans-synaptic signaling causes functional differentiation defects.
1 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
16 MeSH Terms
Renal collecting system growth and function depend upon embryonic γ1 laminin expression.
Yang DH, McKee KK, Chen ZL, Mernaugh G, Strickland S, Zent R, Yurchenco PD
(2011) Development 138: 4535-44
MeSH Terms: Animals, Basement Membrane, Diabetes Insipidus, Female, Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental, Growth Substances, Heparitin Sulfate, Hydronephrosis, Integrin beta1, Kidney Tubules, Collecting, Laminin, Male, Mesoderm, Mice, Mice, 129 Strain, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Morphogenesis, Pregnancy, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added February 25, 2014
In order to understand the functions of laminins in the renal collecting system, the Lamc1 gene was inactivated in the developing mouse ureteric bud (UB). Embryos bearing null alleles exhibited laminin deficiency prior to mesenchymal tubular induction and either failed to develop a UB with involution of the mesenchyme, or developed small kidneys with decreased proliferation and branching, delayed renal vesicle formation and postnatal emergence of a water transport deficit. Embryonic day 12.5 kidneys revealed an almost complete absence of basement membrane proteins and reduced levels of α6 integrin and FGF2. mRNA levels for fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) and mediators of the GDNF/RET and WNT11 signaling pathway were also decreased. Furthermore, collecting duct cells derived from laminin-deficient kidneys and grown in collagen gels were found to proliferate and branch slowly. The laminin-deficient cells exhibited decreased activation of growth factor- and integrin-dependent pathways, whereas heparin lyase-treated and β1 integrin-null cells exhibited more selective decreases. Collectively, these data support a requirement of γ1 laminins for assembly of the collecting duct system basement membrane, in which immobilized ligands act as solid-phase agonists to promote branching morphogenesis, growth and water transport functions.
1 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
20 MeSH Terms
SULF1 and SULF2 regulate heparan sulfate-mediated GDNF signaling for esophageal innervation.
Ai X, Kitazawa T, Do AT, Kusche-Gullberg M, Labosky PA, Emerson CP
(2007) Development 134: 3327-38
MeSH Terms: Animals, Esophagus, Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor, Heparitin Sulfate, Mice, Mice, Mutant Strains, Muscle Contraction, Muscle, Skeletal, Myocytes, Smooth Muscle, Neurites, Neuroglia, Neurons, Peripheral Nervous System, Signal Transduction, Sulfatases, Sulfotransferases
Show Abstract · Added July 20, 2010
Heparan sulfate (HS) plays an essential role in extracellular signaling during development. Biochemical studies have established that HS binding to ligands and receptors is regulated by the fine 6-O-sulfated structure of HS; however, mechanisms that control sulfated HS structure and associated signaling functions in vivo are not known. Extracellular HS 6-O-endosulfatases, SULF1 and SULF2, are candidate enzymatic regulators of HS 6-O-sulfated structure and modulate HS-dependent signaling. To investigate Sulf regulation of developmental signaling, we have disrupted Sulf genes in mouse and identified redundant functions of Sulfs in GDNF-dependent neural innervation and enteric glial formation in the esophagus, resulting in esophageal contractile malfunction in Sulf1(-/-);Sulf2(-/-) mice. SULF1 is expressed in GDNF-expressing esophageal muscle and SULF2 in innervating neurons, establishing their direct functions in esophageal innervation. Biochemical and cell signaling studies show that Sulfs are the major regulators of HS 6-O-desulfation, acting to reduce GDNF binding to HS and to enhance GDNF signaling and neurite sprouting in the embryonic esophagus. The functional specificity of Sulfs in GDNF signaling during esophageal innervation was established by showing that the neurite sprouting is selectively dependent on GDNF, but not on neurotrophins or other signaling ligands. These findings provide the first in vivo evidence that Sulfs are essential developmental regulators of cellular HS 6-O-sulfation for matrix transmission and reception of GDNF signal from muscle to innervating neurons.
1 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
16 MeSH Terms
Regulation of S100A8/A9 (calprotectin) binding to tumor cells by zinc ion and its implication for apoptosis-inducing activity.
Nakatani Y, Yamazaki M, Chazin WJ, Yui S
(2005) Mediators Inflamm 2005: 280-92
MeSH Terms: Animals, Apoptosis, Cell Line, Tumor, Chelating Agents, Heparitin Sulfate, Humans, Iontophoresis, Leukocyte L1 Antigen Complex, Mice, Pentetic Acid, Protein Binding, Zinc
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
S100A8/A9 (calprotectin), which is released by neutrophils under inflammatory conditions, has the capacity to induce apoptosis in various cells. We previously reported that S100A8/A9 induces apoptosis of EL-4 lymphoma cells via the uptake of extracellular zinc in a manner similar to DTPA, a membrane-impermeable zinc chelator. In this study, S100A8/A9-induced apoptosis was examined in several cell lines that are weakly sensitive to DTPA, suggesting S100A8/A9 is directly responsible for apoptosis in these cells. Since zinc inhibits apoptosis of MM46, one of these cells, the regulation by zinc of the capacity of S100A8/A9 to bind MM46 cells was studied. When MM46 cells were incubated with S100A8/A9 in standard or zinc-depleted medium, the amounts of S100A8/A9 bound to cells was markedly lower at 3 h than at 1 h. In contrast, when MM46 cells were incubated with S100A8/A9 in the presence of high levels of zinc, binding to cells was the same at 1 and 3 h. When the cells were permeabilized with saponin prior to analysis, a larger amount of cell-associated S100A8/A9 was detected at 3 h. The amount was further increased in cells treated with chloroquine, suggesting that S100A8/A9 was internalized and degraded in lysosomes. Although it has been reported that S100A8/A9 binds to heparan sulfate on cell membranes, the amount of S100A8/A9 bound to MM46 cells was not reduced by heparinase treatment, but was reduced by trypsin treatment. These results suggest that S100A8/A9 induces apoptosis by direct binding to MM46 cells, and that this activity is regulated by zinc.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
12 MeSH Terms