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Health disparities among adult patients with a phenotypic diagnosis of familial hypercholesterolemia in the CASCADE-FH™ patient registry.
Amrock SM, Duell PB, Knickelbine T, Martin SS, O'Brien EC, Watson KE, Mitri J, Kindt I, Shrader P, Baum SJ, Hemphill LC, Ahmed CD, Andersen RL, Kullo IJ, McCann D, Larry JA, Murray MF, Fishberg R, Guyton JR, Wilemon K, Roe MT, Rader DJ, Ballantyne CM, Underberg JA, Thompson P, Duffy D, Linton MF, Shapiro MD, Moriarty PM, Knowles JW, Ahmad ZS
(2017) Atherosclerosis 267: 19-26
MeSH Terms: Adult, African Americans, Aged, Asian Americans, Cardiovascular Diseases, Cholesterol, HDL, Cholesterol, LDL, Ethnic Groups, Female, Health Status Disparities, Healthcare Disparities, Humans, Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors, Hyperlipoproteinemia Type II, Male, Middle Aged, Multicenter Studies as Topic, Odds Ratio, Phenotype, Prospective Studies, Registries, Retrospective Studies, Risk Factors, Sex Factors
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2018
BACKGROUND AND AIMS - Most familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) patients remain undertreated, and it is unclear what role health disparities may play for FH patients in the US. We sought to describe sex and racial/ethnic disparities in a national registry of US FH patients.
METHODS - We analyzed data from 3167 adults enrolled in the CAscade SCreening for Awareness and DEtection of Familial Hypercholesterolemia (CASCADE-FH) registry. Logistic regression was used to evaluate for disparities in LDL-C goals and statin use, with adjustments for covariates including age, cardiovascular risk factors, and statin intolerance.
RESULTS - In adjusted analyses, women were less likely than men to achieve treated LDL-C of <100 mg/dL (OR 0.68, 95% CI, 0.57-0.82) or ≥50% reduction from pretreatment LDL-C (OR 0.79, 95% CI, 0.65-0.96). Women were less likely than men to receive statin therapy (OR, 0.60, 95% CI, 0.50-0.73) and less likely to receive a high-intensity statin (OR, 0.60, 95% CI, 0.49-0.72). LDL-C goal achievement also varied by race/ethnicity: compared with whites, Asians and blacks were less likely to achieve LDL-C levels <100 mg/dL (Asians, OR, 0.47, 95% CI, 0.24-0.94; blacks, OR, 0.49, 95% CI, 0.32-0.74) or ≥50% reduction from pretreatment LDL-C (Asians, OR 0.56, 95% CI, 0.32-0.98; blacks, OR 0.62, 95% CI, 0.43-0.90).
CONCLUSIONS - In a contemporary US population of FH patients, we identified differences in LDL-C goal attainment and statin usage after stratifying the population by either sex or race/ethnicity. Our findings suggest that health disparities contribute to the undertreatment of US FH patients. Increased efforts are warranted to raise awareness of these disparities.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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24 MeSH Terms
Ideal Cardiovascular Health, Cardiovascular Remodeling, and Heart Failure in Blacks: The Jackson Heart Study.
Spahillari A, Talegawkar S, Correa A, Carr JJ, Terry JG, Lima J, Freedman JE, Das S, Kociol R, de Ferranti S, Mohebali D, Mwasongwe S, Tucker KL, Murthy VL, Shah RV
(2017) Circ Heart Fail 10:
MeSH Terms: Adult, African Americans, Aged, Blood Glucose, Blood Pressure, Comorbidity, Diabetes Mellitus, Exercise, Female, Health Status Disparities, Heart Failure, Humans, Hypertension, Incidence, Kaplan-Meier Estimate, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Cine, Male, Middle Aged, Mississippi, Prospective Studies, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, Risk Reduction Behavior, Sedentary Behavior, Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Smoking Prevention, Ventricular Function, Left, Ventricular Remodeling
Show Abstract · Added September 11, 2017
BACKGROUND - The lifetime risk of heart failure (HF) is higher in the black population than in other racial groups in the United States.
METHODS AND RESULTS - We measured the Life's Simple 7 ideal cardiovascular health metrics in 4195 blacks in the JHS (Jackson Heart Study; 2000-2004). We evaluated the association of Simple 7 metrics with incident HF and left ventricular structure and function by cardiac magnetic resonance (n=1188). Mean age at baseline was 54.4 years (65% women). Relative to 0 to 2 Simple 7 factors, blacks with 3 factors had 47% lower incident HF risk (hazard ratio [HR], 0.53; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.39-0.73; <0.0001); and those with ≥4 factors had 61% lower HF risk (HR, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.24-0.64; =0.0002). Higher blood pressure (HR, 2.32; 95% CI, 1.28-4.20; =0.005), physical inactivity (HR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.07-2.55; =0.02), smoking (HR, 2.04; 95% CI, 1.43-2.91; <0.0001), and impaired glucose control (HR, 1.76; 95% CI, 1.34-2.29; <0.0001) were associated with incident HF. The age-/sex-adjusted population attributable risk for these Simple 7 metrics combined was 37.1%. Achievement of ideal blood pressure, ideal body mass index, ideal glucose control, and nonsmoking was associated with less likelihood of adverse cardiac remodeling by cardiac magnetic resonance.
CONCLUSIONS - Cardiovascular risk factors in midlife (specifically elevated blood pressure, physical inactivity, smoking, and poor glucose control) are associated with incident HF in blacks and represent targets for intensified HF prevention.
© 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.
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29 MeSH Terms
Higher protein intake is associated with increased risk for incident end-stage renal disease among blacks with diabetes in the Southern Community Cohort Study.
Malhotra R, Cavanaugh KL, Blot WJ, Ikizler TA, Lipworth L, Kabagambe EK
(2016) Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis 26: 1079-1087
MeSH Terms: Adult, African Americans, Aged, Case-Control Studies, Databases, Factual, Diabetic Nephropathies, Dietary Proteins, Energy Intake, European Continental Ancestry Group, Feeding Behavior, Female, Health Status Disparities, Humans, Incidence, Kidney Failure, Chronic, Logistic Models, Male, Middle Aged, Odds Ratio, Prospective Studies, Recommended Dietary Allowances, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, Surveys and Questionnaires, Time Factors, United States
Show Abstract · Added September 17, 2016
BACKGROUND AND AIMS - Diabetes, a risk factor for end-stage renal disease (ESRD), is associated with impaired protein metabolism. We investigated whether protein intake is associated with ESRD and whether the risk is higher among blacks with diabetes.
METHODS AND RESULTS - We conducted a nested case-control study of ESRD within the Southern Community Cohort Study, a prospective study of low-income blacks and whites in the southeastern US (2002-2009). Through 2012, 1057 incident ESRD cases were identified by linkage with the United States Renal Data System and matched to 3198 controls by age, sex, and race. Dietary intakes were assessed from a validated food frequency questionnaire at baseline. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed from logistic regression models that included matching variables, BMI, education, income, hypertension, total energy intake, and percent energy from saturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Mean (±SD) daily energy intake from protein was higher among ESRD cases than controls (15.7 ± 3.3 vs. 15.1 ± 3.1%, P < 0.0001). For a 1% increase in percent energy intake from protein, the adjusted ORs (95% CIs) for ESRD were 1.06 (1.02-1.10) for blacks with diabetes, 1.02 (0.98-1.06) for blacks without diabetes, 0.99 (0.90-1.09) for whites with diabetes and 0.94 (0.84-1.06) for whites without diabetes. Protein intake in g/kg/day was also associated with ESRD (4th vs. 1st quartile OR = 1.76; 95% CI: 1.17-2.65).
CONCLUSION - Our results raise the possibility that among blacks with diabetes, increased dietary protein is associated with increased incidence of ESRD. Studies on how protein intake and metabolism affect ESRD are needed.
Copyright © 2016 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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26 MeSH Terms
Tumor Characteristics, Genetics, Management, and the Risk of Metastasis in Uveal Melanoma.
Nichols EE, Richmond A, Daniels AB
(2016) Semin Ophthalmol 31: 304-9
MeSH Terms: Health Status Disparities, Humans, Melanoma, Neoplasm Metastasis, Risk Factors, Survival Rate, Uveal Neoplasms
Show Abstract · Added January 4, 2017
Uveal melanoma is the most common intraocular malignancy in adults. Although rates of local control for uveal melanoma exceed 95% with radiotherapy or enucleation, as many as 50% of patients develop hematogenous metastases, which manifest in the decades following initial diagnosis and are uniformly and rapidly fatal. Recent compelling evidence suggests that not all uveal melanomas are themselves equivalent with respect to metastatic potential and patient survival. This review focuses on the mounting evidence of survival disparities based on intrinsic tumor clinical and histopathologic characteristics and based on tumor genetics and gene expression profiles.
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7 MeSH Terms
Glaucoma Disparities in the Hispanic Population.
Nathan N, Joos KM
(2016) Semin Ophthalmol 31: 394-9
MeSH Terms: Glaucoma, Health Services, Health Services Accessibility, Health Status Disparities, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Risk Factors
Show Abstract · Added March 19, 2018
The Hispanic population is the United States' largest minority and one of the fastest growing as well. In the next 30 to 40 years, the proportion of open-angle glaucoma patients represented by Hispanics is expected to dramatically rise. Here we examine the unique considerations and challenges of glaucoma care in this population, from demographics to risk factors to treatments and outcomes. Currently, access to care and the under-diagnosis of glaucoma in this population are significant issues that look only to grow in significance as the glaucoma burden continues to grow. Additionally, utilization of medical and surgical therapy remains lower in Hispanics than in many other ethnic groups. Understanding and proactively addressing the unique challenges in the screening and treatment of Hispanics will be of utmost importance to providing effective care to this population.
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7 MeSH Terms
Disparities in Uveal Melanoma: Patient Characteristics.
Nichols EE, Richmond A, Daniels AB
(2016) Semin Ophthalmol 31: 296-303
MeSH Terms: Health Status Disparities, Humans, Melanoma, Neoplasm Metastasis, Risk Factors, Survival Rate, Uveal Neoplasms
Show Abstract · Added January 4, 2017
Uveal melanoma is the most common intraocular malignancy in adults. Despite excellent rates of local control, half of all patients with uveal melanoma ultimately go on to develop fatal metastatic disease. This review focuses on disparities and differences in the underlying characteristics of the patients, and how these patient characteristics impact the development of metastasis and subsequent patient survival. Specifically, we detail disparities in epidemiology and risk factors as they relate to the development of primary uveal melanoma, to the development of metastasis, and to patient survival following metastasis.
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7 MeSH Terms
Socioeconomic Disparities in Cataract Prevalence, Characteristics, and Management.
Mundy KM, Nichols E, Lindsey J
(2016) Semin Ophthalmol 31: 358-63
MeSH Terms: Cataract, Cataract Extraction, Health Status Disparities, Humans, Prevalence, Social Class, Vision Disorders
Show Abstract · Added August 31, 2017
PURPOSE - To review the current literature on socioeconomic disparities relationship with cataract prevalence, characteristics, and management.
SUMMARY - Cataracts are an important cause of preventable visual impairment in both the developing and industrialized world. Cataract surgery is a highly effective operation with an excellent risk profile. Furthermore, cataract surgery has been shown to have significant positive functional, social, and economic implications for patients. Several medical conditions have been shown to have correlation with socioeconomic factors and cataract is among several forms of visual impairment that demonstrate this relationship. Disparities in prevalence, clinical characteristics, and management are documented in the ophthalmic literature. A better understanding of these socioeconomic factors and their clinical relevance is critical to alleviating the burden of cataract-related visual impairment in an aging population.
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7 MeSH Terms
Effects of Cancer Stage and Treatment Differences on Racial Disparities in Survival From Colon Cancer: A United States Population-Based Study.
Lai Y, Wang C, Civan JM, Palazzo JP, Ye Z, Hyslop T, Lin J, Myers RE, Li B, Jiang B, Sama A, Xing J, Yang H
(2016) Gastroenterology 150: 1135-1146
MeSH Terms: African Americans, Aged, Colonic Neoplasms, Comorbidity, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Health Status Disparities, Healthcare Disparities, Humans, Kaplan-Meier Estimate, Logistic Models, Male, Neoplasm Grading, Neoplasm Staging, Proportional Hazards Models, Risk Factors, SEER Program, Socioeconomic Factors, Time Factors, Treatment Outcome, Tumor Burden, United States
Show Abstract · Added February 15, 2016
BACKGROUND & AIMS - We evaluated differences in treatment of black vs white patients with colon cancer and assessed their effects on survival, based on cancer stage.
METHODS - We collected data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare database and identified 6190 black and 61,951 white patients with colon cancer diagnosed from 1998 through 2009 and followed up through 2011. Three sets of 6190 white patients were matched sequentially, using a minimum distance strategy, to the same set of 6190 black patients based on demographic (age; sex; diagnosis year; and Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry), tumor presentation (demographic plus comorbidities, tumor stage, grade, and size), and treatment (presentation plus therapies) variables. We conducted sensitivity analyses to explore the effects of socioeconomic status in a subcohort that included 2000 randomly selected black patients. Racial differences in treatment were assessed using a logistic regression model; their effects on racial survival disparity were evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier method and the Cox proportional hazards model.
RESULTS - After patients were matched for demographic variables, the absolute 5-year difference in survival between black and white patients was 8.3% (white, 59.2% 5-y survival; blacks, 50.9% 5-y survival) (P < .0001); this value decreased significantly, to 5.0% (P < .0001), after patients were matched for tumor presentation, and decreased to 4.9% (P < .0001) when patients were matched for treatment. Differences in treatment therefore accounted for 0.1% of the 8.3% difference in survival between black and white patients. After patients were matched for tumor presentation, racial disparities were observed in almost all types of treatment; the disparities were most prominent for patients with advanced-stage cancer (stages III or IV, up to an 11.1% difference) vs early stage cancer (stages I or II, up to a 4.3% difference). After patients were matched for treatment, there was a greater reduction in disparity for black vs white patients with advanced-stage compared with early-stage cancer. In sensitivity analyses, the 5-year racial survival disparity was 7.7% after demographic match, which was less than the 8.3% observed in the complete cohort. This reduction likely was owing to the differences between the subcohort and the complete cohort in those variables that were not included in the demographic match. This value was reduced to 6.5% (P = .0001) after socioeconomic status was included in the demographic match. The difference decreased significantly to 2.8% (P = .090) after tumor presentation match, but was not reduced further after treatment match.
CONCLUSIONS - We observed significant disparities in treatment and survival of black vs white patients with colon cancer. The disparity in survival appears to have been affected more strongly by tumor presentation at diagnosis than treatment. The effects of treatment differences on disparities in survival were greater for patients with advanced-stage vs early-stage cancer.
Copyright © 2016 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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22 MeSH Terms
KIDNEY DISEASE GENETICS AND THE IMPORTANCE OF DIVERSITY IN PRECISION MEDICINE.
Cooke Bailey JN, Wilson S, Brown-Gentry K, Goodloe R, Crawford DC
(2016) Pac Symp Biocomput 21: 285-96
MeSH Terms: Adult, African Americans, Computational Biology, Cross-Sectional Studies, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Gene Frequency, Genetic Variation, Health Status Disparities, Humans, Kidney Diseases, Male, Mexican Americans, Middle Aged, Nutrition Surveys, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Precision Medicine, Quantitative Trait Loci, United States
Show Abstract · Added May 5, 2017
Kidney disease is a well-known health disparity in the United States where African Americans are affected at higher rates compared with other groups such as European Americans and Mexican Americans. Common genetic variants in the myosin, heavy chain 9, non-muscle (MYH9) gene were initially identified as associated with non-diabetic end-stage renal disease in African Americans, and it is now understood that these variants are in strong linkage disequilibrium with likely causal variants in neighboring APOL1. Subsequent genome-wide and candidate gene studies have suggested that MYH9 common variants among others are also associated with chronic kidney disease and quantitative measures of kidney function in various populations. In a precision medicine setting, it is important to consider genetic effects or genetic associations that differ across racial/ethnic groups in delivering data relevant to disease risk or individual-level patient assessment. Kidney disease and quantitative trait-associated genetic variants have yet to be systematically characterized in multiple racial/ethnic groups. Therefore, to further characterize the prevalence of these genetic variants and their association with kidney related traits, we have genotyped 10 kidney disease or quantitative trait-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs2900976, rs10505955, rs10502868, rs1243400, rs9305354, rs12917707, rs17319721, rs2467853, rs2032487, and rs4821480) in 14,998 participants from the population-based cross-sectional National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) III and 1999-2002 as part of the Epidemiologic Architecture for Genes Linked to Environment (EAGLE) study. In this general adult population ascertained regardless of health status (6,293 non-Hispanic whites, 3,013 non-Hispanic blacks, and 3,542 Mexican Americans), we observed higher rates of chronic kidney disease among non-Hispanic blacks compared with the other groups as expected. We performed single SNP tests of association using linear regressions assuming an additive genetic model adjusted for age, sex, diastolic blood pressure, systolic blood pressure, and type 2 diabetes status for several outcomes including creatinine (urinary), creatinine (serum), albumin (urinary), eGFR, and albumin-to-urinary creatinine ratio (ACR). We also tested for associations between each SNP and chronic kidney disease and albuminuria using logistic regression. Surprisingly, none of the MYH9 variants tested was associated with kidney diseases or traits in non-Hispanic blacks (p>0.05), perhaps attributable to the clinical heterogeneity of kidney disease in this population. Several associations were observed in each racial/ethnic group at p<0.05, but none were consistently associated in the same direction in all three groups. The lack of significant and consistent associations is most likely due to power highlighting the importance of the availability of large, diverse populations for genetic association studies of complex diseases and traits to inform precision medicine efforts in diverse patient populations.
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19 MeSH Terms
Impact of Expanded Insurance Coverage on Racial Disparities in Vascular Disease: Insights From Massachusetts.
Loehrer AP, Hawkins AT, Auchincloss HG, Song Z, Hutter MM, Patel VI
(2016) Ann Surg 263: 705-11
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Databases, Factual, Health Care Reform, Health Services Accessibility, Health Status Disparities, Healthcare Disparities, Humans, Insurance Coverage, Insurance, Health, Linear Models, Massachusetts, Middle Aged, Multivariate Analysis, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Peripheral Arterial Disease, Retrospective Studies, Risk Adjustment, Severity of Illness Index, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added September 27, 2016
OBJECTIVE - To evaluate the impact of health insurance expansion on racial disparities in severity of peripheral arterial disease.
BACKGROUND - Lack of insurance and non-white race are associated with increased severity, increased amputation rates, and decreased revascularization rates in patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD). Little is known about how expanded insurance coverage affects disparities in presentation with and management of PAD. The 2006 Massachusetts health reform expanded coverage to 98% of residents and provided the framework for the Affordable Care Act.
METHODS - We conducted a retrospective cohort study of nonelderly, white and non-white patients admitted with PAD in Massachusetts (MA) and 4 control states. Risk-adjusted difference-in-differences models were used to evaluate changes in probability of presenting with severe disease. Multivariable linear regression models were used to evaluate disparities in disease severity before and after the 2006 health insurance expansion.
RESULTS - Before the 2006 MA insurance expansion, non-white patients in both MA and control states had a 12 to 13 percentage-point higher probability of presenting with severe disease (P < 0.001) than white patients. After the expansion, measured disparities in disease severity by patient race were no longer statistically significant in Massachusetts (+3.0 percentage-point difference, P = 0.385) whereas disparities persisted in control states (+10.0 percentage-point difference, P < 0.001). Overall, non-white patients in MA had an 11.2 percentage-point decreased probability of severe PAD (P = 0.042) relative to concurrent trends in control states.
CONCLUSIONS - The 2006 Massachusetts insurance expansion was associated with a decreased probability of patients presenting with severe PAD and resolution of measured racial disparities in severe PAD in MA.
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21 MeSH Terms