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The Role of Mitochondrial DNA Variation in Age-Related Decline in Gait Speed Among Older Men Living With Human Immunodeficiency Virus.
Sun J, Brown TT, Samuels DC, Hulgan T, D'Souza G, Jamieson BD, Erlandson KM, Martinson J, Palella FJ, Margolick JB, Kirk GD, Schrack JA
(2018) Clin Infect Dis 67: 778-784
MeSH Terms: Age Factors, Aging, Body Composition, Cohort Studies, DNA, Mitochondrial, Genetic Variation, HIV Infections, Haplotypes, Humans, Logistic Models, Male, Middle Aged, Odds Ratio, Risk Factors, Sexual and Gender Minorities, Walking Speed
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2018
Background - Age-related gait speed decline is accelerated in men with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Mitochondrial genetic variation is associated with frailty and mortality in the general population and may provide insight into mechanisms of functional decline in people aging with HIV.
Methods - Gait speed was assessed semiannually in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups were extracted from genome-wide genotyping data, classifying men aged ≥50 years into 5 groups: mtDNA haplogroup H, J, T, Uk, and other. Differences in gait speed by haplogroups were assessed as rate of gait speed decline per year, probability of slow gait speed (<1.0 m/s), and hazard of slow gait using multivariable linear mixed-effects models, mixed-effects logistic regression models, and the Andersen-Gill model, controlling for hepatitis C virus infection, previous AIDS diagnosis, thymidine analogues exposure, education, body composition, smoking, and peripheral neuropathy. Age was further controlled for in the mixed-effects logistic regression models.
Results - A total of 455 HIV-positive white men aged ≥50 years contributed 3283 person-years of follow-up. Among them, 70% had achieved HIV viral suppression. In fully adjusted models, individuals with haplogroup J had more rapid decline in gait speed (adjusted slopes, 0.018 m/s/year vs 0.011 m/s/year, pinteraction = 0.012) and increased risk of developing slow gait (adjusted odds ratio, 2.97; 95% confidence interval, 1.24-7.08) compared to those with other haplogroups.
Conclusions - Among older, HIV-infected men, mtDNA haplogroup J was an independent risk factor for more rapid age-related gait speed decline.
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16 MeSH Terms
Mitochondrial Haplogroups Modify the Effect of Diabetes Duration and HbA1c on Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy Risk in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes.
Mitchell SL, Neininger AC, Bruce CN, Chocron IM, Bregman JA, Estopinal CB, Muhammad A, Umfress AC, Jarrell KL, Warden C, Harlow PA, Wellons M, Samuels DC, Brantley MA
(2017) Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 58: 6481-6488
MeSH Terms: Aged, Blood Glucose, Case-Control Studies, DNA, Mitochondrial, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Diabetic Retinopathy, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Glycated Hemoglobin A, Haplotypes, Humans, Male, Mitochondria, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Risk Factors, United States
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2018
Purpose - We previously demonstrated an association between European mitochondrial haplogroups and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). The purpose of this study was to determine how the relationship between these haplogroups and both diabetes duration and hyperglycemia, two major risk factors for diabetic retinopathy (DR), affect PDR prevalence.
Methods - Our population consisted of patients with type 2 diabetes with (n = 377) and without (n = 480) DR. A Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare diabetes duration and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) among mitochondrial haplogroups. Logistic regressions were performed to investigate diabetes duration and HbA1c as risk factors for PDR in the context of European mitochondrial haplogroups.
Results - Neither diabetes duration nor HbA1c differed among mitochondrial haplogroups. Among DR patients from haplogroup H, longer diabetes duration and increasing HbA1c were significant risk factors for PDR (P = 0.0001 and P = 0.011, respectively). Neither diabetes duration nor HbA1c was a significant risk factor for PDR in DR patients from haplogroup UK.
Conclusions - European mitochondrial haplogroups modify the effects of diabetes duration and HbA1c on PDR risk in patients with type 2 diabetes. In our patient population, longer diabetes duration and higher HbA1c increased PDR risk in patients from haplogroup H, but did not affect PDR risk in patients from haplogroup UK. This relationship has not been previously demonstrated and may explain, in part, why some patients with nonproliferative DR develop PDR and others do not, despite similar diabetes duration and glycemic control.
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Local ancestry transitions modify snp-trait associations.
Fish AE, Crawford DC, Capra JA, Bush WS
(2018) Pac Symp Biocomput 23: 424-435
MeSH Terms: Adult, African Continental Ancestry Group, Chromosomes, Human, Computational Biology, Epistasis, Genetic, European Continental Ancestry Group, Evolution, Molecular, Gene Frequency, Genetics, Population, Genome-Wide Association Study, Haplotypes, Humans, Linear Models, Models, Genetic, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Recombination, Genetic
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Genomic maps of local ancestry identify ancestry transitions - points on a chromosome where recent recombination events in admixed individuals have joined two different ancestral haplotypes. These events bring together alleles that evolved within separate continential populations, providing a unique opportunity to evaluate the joint effect of these alleles on health outcomes. In this work, we evaluate the impact of genetic variants in the context of nearby local ancestry transitions within a sample of nearly 10,000 adults of African ancestry with traits derived from electronic health records. Genetic data was located using the Metabochip, and used to derive local ancestry. We develop a model that captures the effect of both single variants and local ancestry, and use it to identify examples where local ancestry transitions significantly interact with nearby variants to influence metabolic traits. In our most compelling example, we find that the minor allele of rs16890640 occuring on a European background with a downstream local ancestry transition to African ancestry results in significantly lower mean corpuscular hemoglobin and volume. This finding represents a new way of discovering genetic interactions, and is supported by molecular data that suggest changes to local ancestry may impact local chromatin looping.
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16 MeSH Terms
Type 2 Diabetes Variants Disrupt Function of SLC16A11 through Two Distinct Mechanisms.
Rusu V, Hoch E, Mercader JM, Tenen DE, Gymrek M, Hartigan CR, DeRan M, von Grotthuss M, Fontanillas P, Spooner A, Guzman G, Deik AA, Pierce KA, Dennis C, Clish CB, Carr SA, Wagner BK, Schenone M, Ng MCY, Chen BH, MEDIA Consortium, SIGMA T2D Consortium, Centeno-Cruz F, Zerrweck C, Orozco L, Altshuler DM, Schreiber SL, Florez JC, Jacobs SBR, Lander ES
(2017) Cell 170: 199-212.e20
MeSH Terms: Basigin, Cell Membrane, Chromosomes, Human, Pair 17, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Gene Knockdown Techniques, Haplotypes, Hepatocytes, Heterozygote, Histone Code, Humans, Liver, Models, Molecular, Monocarboxylic Acid Transporters
Show Abstract · Added September 20, 2017
Type 2 diabetes (T2D) affects Latinos at twice the rate seen in populations of European descent. We recently identified a risk haplotype spanning SLC16A11 that explains ∼20% of the increased T2D prevalence in Mexico. Here, through genetic fine-mapping, we define a set of tightly linked variants likely to contain the causal allele(s). We show that variants on the T2D-associated haplotype have two distinct effects: (1) decreasing SLC16A11 expression in liver and (2) disrupting a key interaction with basigin, thereby reducing cell-surface localization. Both independent mechanisms reduce SLC16A11 function and suggest SLC16A11 is the causal gene at this locus. To gain insight into how SLC16A11 disruption impacts T2D risk, we demonstrate that SLC16A11 is a proton-coupled monocarboxylate transporter and that genetic perturbation of SLC16A11 induces changes in fatty acid and lipid metabolism that are associated with increased T2D risk. Our findings suggest that increasing SLC16A11 function could be therapeutically beneficial for T2D. VIDEO ABSTRACT.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Mitochondrial Haplogroups Affect Severity But Not Prevalence of Diabetic Retinopathy.
Bregman JA, Herren DJ, Estopinal CB, Chocron IM, Harlow PA, Warden C, Brantley MA, Samuels DC
(2017) Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 58: 1346-1351
MeSH Terms: Aged, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Diabetic Retinopathy, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Glycated Hemoglobin A, Haplotypes, Humans, Logistic Models, Male, Middle Aged, Mitochondria, Prevalence, Risk Factors, Severity of Illness Index, United Kingdom
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2018
Purpose - We previously reported European mitochondrial haplogroup H to be a risk factor for and haplogroup UK to be protective against proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) among Caucasian patients with diabetic retinopathy (DR). The purpose of this study was to determine whether these haplogroups are also associated with the risk of having DR among Caucasian patients with diabetes.
Methods - Deidentified medical records for 637 Caucasian patients with diabetes (223 with DR) were obtained from BioVU, Vanderbilt University's electronic, deidentified DNA databank. An additional 197 Caucasian patients with diabetes (98 with DR) were enrolled from the Vanderbilt Eye Institute (VEI). We tested for an association between European mitochondrial haplogroups and DR status.
Results - The percentage of diabetes patients with DR did not differ across the haplogroups (P = 0.32). The percentage of patients with nonproliferative DR (NPDR; P = 0.0084) and with PDR (P = 0.027) significantly differed across the haplogroups. In logistic regressions adjusting for sex, age, diabetes type, duration of diabetes, and hemoglobin A1c, neither haplogroup H nor haplogroup UK had a significant effect on DR compared with diabetic controls. Haplogroup UK was a significant risk factor (OR = 1.72 [1.13-2.59], P = 0.010) for NPDR compared with diabetic controls in the unadjusted analysis, but not in the adjusted analysis (OR = 1.29 [0.79-2.10], P = 0.20).
Conclusions - Mitochondrial haplogroups H and UK were associated with severity, but not presence, of DR. These data argue that the effect of these haplogroups is related to ischemia and neovascularization, the defining features of PDR.
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17 MeSH Terms
Comparison of HLA allelic imputation programs.
Karnes JH, Shaffer CM, Bastarache L, Gaudieri S, Glazer AM, Steiner HE, Mosley JD, Mallal S, Denny JC, Phillips EJ, Roden DM
(2017) PLoS One 12: e0172444
MeSH Terms: African Americans, Alleles, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Gene Frequency, Genome-Wide Association Study, Genotype, HLA Antigens, Haplotypes, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Imputation of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles from SNP-level data is attractive due to importance of HLA alleles in human disease, widespread availability of genome-wide association study (GWAS) data, and expertise required for HLA sequencing. However, comprehensive evaluations of HLA imputations programs are limited. We compared HLA imputation results of HIBAG, SNP2HLA, and HLA*IMP:02 to sequenced HLA alleles in 3,265 samples from BioVU, a de-identified electronic health record database coupled to a DNA biorepository. We performed four-digit HLA sequencing for HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, -DPB1, and -DQB1 using long-read 454 FLX sequencing. All samples were genotyped using both the Illumina HumanExome BeadChip platform and a GWAS platform. Call rates and concordance rates were compared by platform, frequency of allele, and race/ethnicity. Overall concordance rates were similar between programs in European Americans (EA) (0.975 [SNP2HLA]; 0.939 [HLA*IMP:02]; 0.976 [HIBAG]). SNP2HLA provided a significant advantage in terms of call rate and the number of alleles imputed. Concordance rates were lower overall for African Americans (AAs). These observations were consistent when accuracy was compared across HLA loci. All imputation programs performed similarly for low frequency HLA alleles. Higher concordance rates were observed when HLA alleles were imputed from GWAS platforms versus the HumanExome BeadChip, suggesting that high genomic coverage is preferred as input for HLA allelic imputation. These findings provide guidance on the best use of HLA imputation methods and elucidate their limitations.
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Are Interactions between cis-Regulatory Variants Evidence for Biological Epistasis or Statistical Artifacts?
Fish AE, Capra JA, Bush WS
(2016) Am J Hum Genet 99: 817-830
MeSH Terms: Artifacts, Binding Sites, Datasets as Topic, Epistasis, Genetic, Ethnic Groups, Gene Expression Regulation, Genetic Variation, Haplotypes, Humans, Linkage Disequilibrium, Models, Genetic, Models, Statistical, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Quantitative Trait Loci, RNA-Binding Proteins, Regulatory Sequences, Nucleic Acid
Show Abstract · Added April 18, 2017
The importance of epistasis-or statistical interactions between genetic variants-to the development of complex disease in humans has been controversial. Genome-wide association studies of statistical interactions influencing human traits have recently become computationally feasible and have identified many putative interactions. However, statistical models used to detect interactions can be confounded, which makes it difficult to be certain that observed statistical interactions are evidence for true molecular epistasis. In this study, we investigate whether there is evidence for epistatic interactions between genetic variants within the cis-regulatory region that influence gene expression after accounting for technical, statistical, and biological confounding factors. We identified 1,119 (FDR = 5%) interactions that appear to regulate gene expression in human lymphoblastoid cell lines, a tightly controlled, largely genetically determined phenotype. Many of these interactions replicated in an independent dataset (90 of 803 tested, Bonferroni threshold). We then performed an exhaustive analysis of both known and novel confounders, including ceiling/floor effects, missing genotype combinations, haplotype effects, single variants tagged through linkage disequilibrium, and population stratification. Every interaction could be explained by at least one of these confounders, and replication in independent datasets did not protect against some confounders. Assuming that the confounding factors provide a more parsimonious explanation for each interaction, we find it unlikely that cis-regulatory interactions contribute strongly to human gene expression, which calls into question the relevance of cis-regulatory interactions for other human phenotypes. We additionally propose several best practices for epistasis testing to protect future studies from confounding.
Copyright © 2016 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Evidence that the 5p12 Variant rs10941679 Confers Susceptibility to Estrogen-Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer through FGF10 and MRPS30 Regulation.
Ghoussaini M, French JD, Michailidou K, Nord S, Beesley J, Canisus S, Hillman KM, Kaufmann S, Sivakumaran H, Moradi Marjaneh M, Lee JS, Dennis J, Bolla MK, Wang Q, Dicks E, Milne RL, Hopper JL, Southey MC, Schmidt MK, Broeks A, Muir K, Lophatananon A, Fasching PA, Beckmann MW, Fletcher O, Johnson N, Sawyer EJ, Tomlinson I, Burwinkel B, Marme F, Guénel P, Truong T, Bojesen SE, Flyger H, Benitez J, González-Neira A, Alonso MR, Pita G, Neuhausen SL, Anton-Culver H, Brenner H, Arndt V, Meindl A, Schmutzler RK, Brauch H, Hamann U, Tessier DC, Vincent D, Nevanlinna H, Khan S, Matsuo K, Ito H, Dörk T, Bogdanova NV, Lindblom A, Margolin S, Mannermaa A, Kosma VM, kConFab/AOCS Investigators, Wu AH, Van Den Berg D, Lambrechts D, Floris G, Chang-Claude J, Rudolph A, Radice P, Barile M, Couch FJ, Hallberg E, Giles GG, Haiman CA, Le Marchand L, Goldberg MS, Teo SH, Yip CH, Borresen-Dale AL, NBCS Collaborators, Zheng W, Cai Q, Winqvist R, Pylkäs K, Andrulis IL, Devilee P, Tollenaar RA, García-Closas M, Figueroa J, Hall P, Czene K, Brand JS, Darabi H, Eriksson M, Hooning MJ, Koppert LB, Li J, Shu XO, Zheng Y, Cox A, Cross SS, Shah M, Rhenius V, Choi JY, Kang D, Hartman M, Chia KS, Kabisch M, Torres D, Luccarini C, Conroy DM, Jakubowska A, Lubinski J, Sangrajrang S, Brennan P, Olswold C, Slager S, Shen CY, Hou MF, Swerdlow A, Schoemaker MJ, Simard J, Pharoah PD, Kristensen V, Chenevix-Trench G, Easton DF, Dunning AM, Edwards SL
(2016) Am J Hum Genet 99: 903-911
MeSH Terms: Alleles, Breast Neoplasms, Case-Control Studies, Cell Line, Tumor, Chromosomes, Human, Pair 5, Enhancer Elements, Genetic, Fibroblast Growth Factor 10, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Haplotypes, Humans, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Promoter Regions, Genetic, Quantitative Trait Loci, Receptor, Fibroblast Growth Factor, Type 2, Receptors, Estrogen
Show Abstract · Added April 3, 2018
Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have revealed increased breast cancer risk associated with multiple genetic variants at 5p12. Here, we report the fine mapping of this locus using data from 104,660 subjects from 50 case-control studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). With data for 3,365 genotyped and imputed SNPs across a 1 Mb region (positions 44,394,495-45,364,167; NCBI build 37), we found evidence for at least three independent signals: the strongest signal, consisting of a single SNP rs10941679, was associated with risk of estrogen-receptor-positive (ER) breast cancer (per-g allele OR ER = 1.15; 95% CI 1.13-1.18; p = 8.35 × 10). After adjustment for rs10941679, we detected signal 2, consisting of 38 SNPs more strongly associated with ER-negative (ER) breast cancer (lead SNP rs6864776: per-a allele OR ER = 1.10; 95% CI 1.05-1.14; p conditional = 1.44 × 10), and a single signal 3 SNP (rs200229088: per-t allele OR ER = 1.12; 95% CI 1.09-1.15; p conditional = 1.12 × 10). Expression quantitative trait locus analysis in normal breast tissues and breast tumors showed that the g (risk) allele of rs10941679 was associated with increased expression of FGF10 and MRPS30. Functional assays demonstrated that SNP rs10941679 maps to an enhancer element that physically interacts with the FGF10 and MRPS30 promoter regions in breast cancer cell lines. FGF10 is an oncogene that binds to FGFR2 and is overexpressed in ∼10% of human breast cancers, whereas MRPS30 plays a key role in apoptosis. These data suggest that the strongest signal of association at 5p12 is mediated through coordinated activation of FGF10 and MRPS30, two candidate genes for breast cancer pathogenesis.
Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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MeSH Terms
Identification of independent association signals and putative functional variants for breast cancer risk through fine-scale mapping of the 12p11 locus.
Zeng C, Guo X, Long J, Kuchenbaecker KB, Droit A, Michailidou K, Ghoussaini M, Kar S, Freeman A, Hopper JL, Milne RL, Bolla MK, Wang Q, Dennis J, Agata S, Ahmed S, Aittomäki K, Andrulis IL, Anton-Culver H, Antonenkova NN, Arason A, Arndt V, Arun BK, Arver B, Bacot F, Barrowdale D, Baynes C, Beeghly-Fadiel A, Benitez J, Bermisheva M, Blomqvist C, Blot WJ, Bogdanova NV, Bojesen SE, Bonanni B, Borresen-Dale AL, Brand JS, Brauch H, Brennan P, Brenner H, Broeks A, Brüning T, Burwinkel B, Buys SS, Cai Q, Caldes T, Campbell I, Carpenter J, Chang-Claude J, Choi JY, Claes KB, Clarke C, Cox A, Cross SS, Czene K, Daly MB, de la Hoya M, De Leeneer K, Devilee P, Diez O, Domchek SM, Doody M, Dorfling CM, Dörk T, Dos-Santos-Silva I, Dumont M, Dwek M, Dworniczak B, Egan K, Eilber U, Einbeigi Z, Ejlertsen B, Ellis S, Frost D, Lalloo F, EMBRACE, Fasching PA, Figueroa J, Flyger H, Friedlander M, Friedman E, Gambino G, Gao YT, Garber J, García-Closas M, Gehrig A, Damiola F, Lesueur F, Mazoyer S, Stoppa-Lyonnet D, behalf of GEMO Study Collaborators, Giles GG, Godwin AK, Goldgar DE, González-Neira A, Greene MH, Guénel P, Haeberle L, Haiman CA, Hallberg E, Hamann U, Hansen TV, Hart S, Hartikainen JM, Hartman M, Hassan N, Healey S, Hogervorst FB, Verhoef S, HEBON, Hendricks CB, Hillemanns P, Hollestelle A, Hulick PJ, Hunter DJ, Imyanitov EN, Isaacs C, Ito H, Jakubowska A, Janavicius R, Jaworska-Bieniek K, Jensen UB, John EM, Joly Beauparlant C, Jones M, Kabisch M, Kang D, Karlan BY, Kauppila S, Kerin MJ, Khan S, Khusnutdinova E, Knight JA, Konstantopoulou I, Kraft P, Kwong A, Laitman Y, Lambrechts D, Lazaro C, Le Marchand L, Lee CN, Lee MH, Lester J, Li J, Liljegren A, Lindblom A, Lophatananon A, Lubinski J, Mai PL, Mannermaa A, Manoukian S, Margolin S, Marme F, Matsuo K, McGuffog L, Meindl A, Menegaux F, Montagna M, Muir K, Mulligan AM, Nathanson KL, Neuhausen SL, Nevanlinna H, Newcomb PA, Nord S, Nussbaum RL, Offit K, Olah E, Olopade OI, Olswold C, Osorio A, Papi L, Park-Simon TW, Paulsson-Karlsson Y, Peeters S, Peissel B, Peterlongo P, Peto J, Pfeiler G, Phelan CM, Presneau N, Radice P, Rahman N, Ramus SJ, Rashid MU, Rennert G, Rhiem K, Rudolph A, Salani R, Sangrajrang S, Sawyer EJ, Schmidt MK, Schmutzler RK, Schoemaker MJ, Schürmann P, Seynaeve C, Shen CY, Shrubsole MJ, Shu XO, Sigurdson A, Singer CF, Slager S, Soucy P, Southey M, Steinemann D, Swerdlow A, Szabo CI, Tchatchou S, Teixeira MR, Teo SH, Terry MB, Tessier DC, Teulé A, Thomassen M, Tihomirova L, Tischkowitz M, Toland AE, Tung N, Turnbull C, van den Ouweland AM, van Rensburg EJ, Ven den Berg D, Vijai J, Wang-Gohrke S, Weitzel JN, Whittemore AS, Winqvist R, Wong TY, Wu AH, Yannoukakos D, Yu JC, Pharoah PD, Hall P, Chenevix-Trench G, KConFab, AOCS Investigators, Dunning AM, Simard J, Couch FJ, Antoniou AC, Easton DF, Zheng W
(2016) Breast Cancer Res 18: 64
MeSH Terms: Alleles, BRCA1 Protein, Breast Neoplasms, Case-Control Studies, Chromosome Mapping, Chromosomes, Human, Pair 12, Computational Biology, Databases, Genetic, Enhancer Elements, Genetic, Epigenesis, Genetic, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genome-Wide Association Study, Genotype, Haplotypes, Heterozygote, Humans, Mutation, Odds Ratio, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Population Surveillance, Promoter Regions, Genetic, Quantitative Trait Loci, Risk
Show Abstract · Added April 18, 2017
BACKGROUND - Multiple recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs10771399, at 12p11 that is associated with breast cancer risk.
METHOD - We performed a fine-scale mapping study of a 700 kb region including 441 genotyped and more than 1300 imputed genetic variants in 48,155 cases and 43,612 controls of European descent, 6269 cases and 6624 controls of East Asian descent and 1116 cases and 932 controls of African descent in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC; http://bcac.ccge.medschl.cam.ac.uk/ ), and in 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). Stepwise regression analyses were performed to identify independent association signals. Data from the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements project (ENCODE) and the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) were used for functional annotation.
RESULTS - Analysis of data from European descendants found evidence for four independent association signals at 12p11, represented by rs7297051 (odds ratio (OR) = 1.09, 95 % confidence interval (CI) = 1.06-1.12; P = 3 × 10(-9)), rs805510 (OR = 1.08, 95 % CI = 1.04-1.12, P = 2 × 10(-5)), and rs1871152 (OR = 1.04, 95 % CI = 1.02-1.06; P = 2 × 10(-4)) identified in the general populations, and rs113824616 (P = 7 × 10(-5)) identified in the meta-analysis of BCAC ER-negative cases and BRCA1 mutation carriers. SNPs rs7297051, rs805510 and rs113824616 were also associated with breast cancer risk at P < 0.05 in East Asians, but none of the associations were statistically significant in African descendants. Multiple candidate functional variants are located in putative enhancer sequences. Chromatin interaction data suggested that PTHLH was the likely target gene of these enhancers. Of the six variants with the strongest evidence of potential functionality, rs11049453 was statistically significantly associated with the expression of PTHLH and its nearby gene CCDC91 at P < 0.05.
CONCLUSION - This study identified four independent association signals at 12p11 and revealed potentially functional variants, providing additional insights into the underlying biological mechanism(s) for the association observed between variants at 12p11 and breast cancer risk.
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25 MeSH Terms
RAD51B in Familial Breast Cancer.
Pelttari LM, Khan S, Vuorela M, Kiiski JI, Vilske S, Nevanlinna V, Ranta S, Schleutker J, Winqvist R, Kallioniemi A, Dörk T, Bogdanova NV, Figueroa J, Pharoah PD, Schmidt MK, Dunning AM, García-Closas M, Bolla MK, Dennis J, Michailidou K, Wang Q, Hopper JL, Southey MC, Rosenberg EH, Fasching PA, Beckmann MW, Peto J, Dos-Santos-Silva I, Sawyer EJ, Tomlinson I, Burwinkel B, Surowy H, Guénel P, Truong T, Bojesen SE, Nordestgaard BG, Benitez J, González-Neira A, Neuhausen SL, Anton-Culver H, Brenner H, Arndt V, Meindl A, Schmutzler RK, Brauch H, Brüning T, Lindblom A, Margolin S, Mannermaa A, Hartikainen JM, Chenevix-Trench G, kConFab/AOCS Investigators, Van Dyck L, Janssen H, Chang-Claude J, Rudolph A, Radice P, Peterlongo P, Hallberg E, Olson JE, Giles GG, Milne RL, Haiman CA, Schumacher F, Simard J, Dumont M, Kristensen V, Borresen-Dale AL, Zheng W, Beeghly-Fadiel A, Grip M, Andrulis IL, Glendon G, Devilee P, Seynaeve C, Hooning MJ, Collée M, Cox A, Cross SS, Shah M, Luben RN, Hamann U, Torres D, Jakubowska A, Lubinski J, Couch FJ, Yannoukakos D, Orr N, Swerdlow A, Darabi H, Li J, Czene K, Hall P, Easton DF, Mattson J, Blomqvist C, Aittomäki K, Nevanlinna H
(2016) PLoS One 11: e0153788
MeSH Terms: Breast Neoplasms, DNA-Binding Proteins, Female, Finland, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genotyping Techniques, Haplotypes, Heterozygote, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Mutation, Missense, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Show Abstract · Added April 18, 2017
Common variation on 14q24.1, close to RAD51B, has been associated with breast cancer: rs999737 and rs2588809 with the risk of female breast cancer and rs1314913 with the risk of male breast cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of RAD51B variants in breast cancer predisposition, particularly in the context of familial breast cancer in Finland. We sequenced the coding region of RAD51B in 168 Finnish breast cancer patients from the Helsinki region for identification of possible recurrent founder mutations. In addition, we studied the known rs999737, rs2588809, and rs1314913 SNPs and RAD51B haplotypes in 44,791 breast cancer cases and 43,583 controls from 40 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) that were genotyped on a custom chip (iCOGS). We identified one putatively pathogenic missense mutation c.541C>T among the Finnish cancer patients and subsequently genotyped the mutation in additional breast cancer cases (n = 5259) and population controls (n = 3586) from Finland and Belarus. No significant association with breast cancer risk was seen in the meta-analysis of the Finnish datasets or in the large BCAC dataset. The association with previously identified risk variants rs999737, rs2588809, and rs1314913 was replicated among all breast cancer cases and also among familial cases in the BCAC dataset. The most significant association was observed for the haplotype carrying the risk-alleles of all the three SNPs both among all cases (odds ratio (OR): 1.15, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11-1.19, P = 8.88 x 10-16) and among familial cases (OR: 1.24, 95% CI: 1.16-1.32, P = 6.19 x 10-11), compared to the haplotype with the respective protective alleles. Our results suggest that loss-of-function mutations in RAD51B are rare, but common variation at the RAD51B region is significantly associated with familial breast cancer risk.
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13 MeSH Terms