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Results: 1 to 5 of 5

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Photoactive films of photosystem I on transparent reduced graphene oxide electrodes.
Darby E, LeBlanc G, Gizzie EA, Winter KM, Jennings GK, Cliffel DE
(2014) Langmuir 30: 8990-4
MeSH Terms: 2,6-Dichloroindophenol, Electrodes, Electron Transport, Ferricyanides, Ferrocyanides, Graphite, Oxidation-Reduction, Oxides, Photosystem I Protein Complex, Ruthenium Compounds, Solar Energy
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
Photosystem I (PSI) is a photoactive electron-transport protein found in plants that participates in the process of photosynthesis. Because of PSI's abundance in nature and its efficiency with charge transfer and separation, there is a great interest in applying the protein in photoactive electrodes. Here, we developed a completely organic, transparent, conductive electrode using reduced graphene oxide (RGO) on which a multilayer of PSI could be deposited. The resulting photoactive electrode demonstrated current densities comparable to that of a gold electrode modified with a multilayer film of PSI and significantly higher than that of a graphene electrode modified with a monolayer film of PSI. The relatively large photocurrents produced by integrating PSI with RGO and using an opaque, organic mediator can be applied to the facile production of more economic solar energy conversion devices.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
11 MeSH Terms
Three-dimensional graphene foams promote osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells.
Crowder SW, Prasai D, Rath R, Balikov DA, Bae H, Bolotin KI, Sung HJ
(2013) Nanoscale 5: 4171-6
MeSH Terms: Cell Culture Techniques, Cell Differentiation, Cell Survival, Cells, Cultured, Graphite, Humans, Mesenchymal Stem Cells, Osteogenesis
Show Abstract · Added May 29, 2014
Graphene is a novel material whose application in biomedical sciences has only begun to be realized. In the present study, we have employed three-dimensional graphene foams as culture substrates for human mesenchymal stem cells and provide evidence that these materials can maintain stem cell viability and promote osteogenic differentiation.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
8 MeSH Terms
Photosystem I on graphene as a highly transparent, photoactive electrode.
Gunther D, LeBlanc G, Prasai D, Zhang JR, Cliffel DE, Bolotin KI, Jennings GK
(2013) Langmuir 29: 4177-80
MeSH Terms: Adsorption, Electrodes, Graphite, Photochemical Processes, Photosystem I Protein Complex, Spinacia oleracea, Surface Properties
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
We report the fabrication of a hybrid light-harvesting electrode consisting of photosystem I (PSI) proteins extracted from spinach and adsorbed as a monolayer onto electrically contacted, large-area graphene. The transparency of graphene supports the choice of an opaque mediator at elevated concentrations. For example, we report a photocurrent of 550 nA/cm(2) from a monolayer of PSI on graphene in the presence of 20 mM methylene blue, which yields an opaque blue solution. The PSI-modified graphene electrode has a total thickness of less than 10 nm and demonstrates photoactivity that is an order of magnitude larger than that for unmodified graphene, establishing the feasibility of conjoining these nanomaterials as potential constructs in next-generation photovoltaic devices.
0 Communities
1 Members
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7 MeSH Terms
Graphene: corrosion-inhibiting coating.
Prasai D, Tuberquia JC, Harl RR, Jennings GK, Rogers BR, Bolotin KI
(2012) ACS Nano 6: 1102-8
MeSH Terms: Copper, Corrosion, Dielectric Spectroscopy, Electrochemical Techniques, Graphite, Mechanical Phenomena, Surface Properties, Volatilization
Show Abstract · Added May 23, 2013
We report the use of atomically thin layers of graphene as a protective coating that inhibits corrosion of underlying metals. Here, we employ electrochemical methods to study the corrosion inhibition of copper and nickel by either growing graphene on these metals, or by mechanically transferring multilayer graphene onto them. Cyclic voltammetry measurements reveal that the graphene coating effectively suppresses metal oxidation and oxygen reduction. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements suggest that while graphene itself is not damaged, the metal under it is corroded at cracks in the graphene film. Finally, we use Tafel analysis to quantify the corrosion rates of samples with and without graphene coatings. These results indicate that copper films coated with graphene grown via chemical vapor deposition are corroded 7 times slower in an aerated Na(2)SO(4) solution as compared to the corrosion rate of bare copper. Tafel analysis reveals that nickel with a multilayer graphene film grown on it corrodes 20 times slower while nickel surfaces coated with four layers of mechanically transferred graphene corrode 4 times slower than bare nickel. These findings establish graphene as the thinnest known corrosion-protecting coating.
0 Communities
1 Members
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8 MeSH Terms
Transferable graphene oxide films with tunable microstructures.
Hasan SA, Rigueur JL, Harl RR, Krejci AJ, Gonzalo-Juan I, Rogers BR, Dickerson JH
(2010) ACS Nano 4: 7367-72
MeSH Terms: Electrophoresis, Graphite, Microtechnology, Oxides, Suspensions
Show Abstract · Added May 23, 2013
This report describes methods to produce large-area films of graphene oxide from aqueous suspensions using electrophoretic deposition. By selecting the appropriate suspension pH and deposition voltage, films of the negatively charged graphene oxide sheets can be produced with either a smooth "rug" microstructure on the anode or a porous "brick" microstructure on the cathode. Cathodic deposition occurs in the low pH suspension with the application of a relatively high voltage, which facilitates a gradual change in the colloids' charge from negative to positive as they adsorb protons released by the electrolysis of water. The shift in the colloids' charge also gives rise to the brick microstructure, as the concurrent decrease in electrostatic repulsion between graphene oxide sheets results in the formation of multilayered aggregates (the "bricks"). Measurements of water contact angle revealed the brick films (79°) to be more hydrophobic than the rug films (41°), a difference we attribute primarily to the distinct microstructures. Finally, we describe a sacrificial layer technique to make these graphene oxide films free-standing, which would enable them to be placed on arbitrary substrates.
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1 Members
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5 MeSH Terms