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Lupus-Prone Mice Resist Immune Regulation and Transplant Tolerance Induction.
Stocks BT, Wilhelm AJ, Wilson CS, Marshall AF, Putnam NE, Major AS, Moore DJ
(2016) Am J Transplant 16: 334-41
MeSH Terms: Animals, Autoantibodies, Autoimmunity, Cells, Cultured, Dendritic Cells, Graft Rejection, Graft Survival, Islets of Langerhans Transplantation, Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic, Lupus Nephritis, Mice, Mice, Inbred C3H, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Inbred MRL lpr, Mice, Inbred NOD, T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory, Transplantation Tolerance
Show Abstract · Added September 16, 2015
The strongly immunogenic environment in autoimmune diseases such as lupus may pose a stringent barrier to transplantation. Despite available murine models of lupus, transplant tolerance in this setting has yet to be fully investigated in highly penetrant genetic models of disease. Such studies are of clear clinical importance because lupus is a transplant indication in which transplanted kidneys have a substantially increased risk of rejection including a role for recurrent nephritis. In the fully penetrant B6.SLE123 mouse, we determined that CD4 T follicular helper and germinal center B cells were significantly expanded compared with healthy controls. We traced this expansion to resistance of effector CD4 T and B cells in B6.SLE123 mice to regulation by either CD4 T regulatory cells (CD4Tregs) or CD8 T regulatory cells (CD8Tregs), despite demonstrating normal function by Tregs in this strain. Finally, we determined that B6.SLE123 mice resist anti-CD45RB-mediated tolerance induction to foreign islet allografts, even in the absence of islet autoimmunity. Overall, B6.SLE123 lupus-prone mice are highly resistant to transplant tolerance induction, which provides a new model of failed tolerance in autoimmunity that may elucidate barriers to clinical transplantation in lupus through further cellular and genetic dissection.
© Copyright 2015 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.
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17 MeSH Terms
Incidence and early outcomes associated with pre-transplant antivimentin antibodies in the cardiac transplantation population.
Young RK, Dale B, Russell SD, Zachary AA, Tedford RJ
(2015) Clin Transplant 29: 685-8
MeSH Terms: Adult, Autoantibodies, Baltimore, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Graft Rejection, Graft Survival, Heart Diseases, Heart Transplantation, Humans, Incidence, Male, Postoperative Complications, Prognosis, Retrospective Studies, Risk Factors, Survival Rate, Vimentin
Show Abstract · Added September 7, 2017
BACKGROUND - In cardiac transplant recipients, the development of antibodies to the endothelial intermediate filament protein vimentin (antivimentin antibodies, AVA) has been associated with rejection and poor outcomes. However, the incidence of these antibodies prior to transplantation and their association with early rejection has not been investigated.
METHODS - Pre-transplant serum was analyzed from 50 patients who underwent de novo cardiac transplant at Johns Hopkins Hospital from 2004 to 2012. Demographic, one-yr rejection, and survival data were obtained from the transplant database.
RESULTS - The incidence of pre-transplant AVA was 34%. AVA-positive patients were younger (p = 0.03), and there was an a trend toward incidence in females (p = 0.08). Demographic data were similar among both groups. AVA positivity did not predict rejection in the first year post-transplant. There was no difference in rejection-free graft survival (53 vs. 52%, p = 0.85) at one yr. Similarly, there was no difference in graft survival at one yr (82 vs. 88%, p = 0.56) or graft survival at a median follow-up of 23 and 26 months, respectively (76 vs. 85%, p = 0.41).
CONCLUSIONS - AVA is common in the cardiac pre-transplant population with a higher incidence in the young. The presence of detectable AVA did not correlate with early post-transplant rejection or graft survival.
© 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
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18 MeSH Terms
TIM-1 signaling is required for maintenance and induction of regulatory B cells.
Yeung MY, Ding Q, Brooks CR, Xiao S, Workman CJ, Vignali DA, Ueno T, Padera RF, Kuchroo VK, Najafian N, Rothstein DM
(2015) Am J Transplant 15: 942-53
MeSH Terms: Animals, B-Lymphocytes, Regulatory, Graft Survival, Hepatitis A Virus Cellular Receptor 1, Interleukin-10, Membrane Proteins, Mice, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added September 12, 2016
Apart from their role in humoral immunity, B cells can exhibit IL-10-dependent regulatory activity (Bregs). These regulatory subpopulations have been shown to inhibit inflammation and allograft rejection. However, our understanding of Bregs has been hampered by their rarity, lack of a specific marker, and poor insight into their induction and maintenance. We previously demonstrated that T cell immunoglobulin mucin domain-1 (TIM-1) identifies over 70% of IL-10-producing B cells, irrespective of other markers. We now show that TIM-1 is the primary receptor responsible for Breg induction by apoptotic cells (ACs). However, B cells that express a mutant form of TIM-1 lacking the mucin domain (TIM-1(Δmucin) ) exhibit decreased phosphatidylserine binding and are unable to produce IL-10 in response to ACs or by specific ligation with anti-TIM-1. TIM-1(Δmucin) mice also exhibit accelerated allograft rejection, which appears to be due in part to their defect in both baseline and induced IL-10(+) Bregs, since a single transfer of WT TIM-1(+) B cells can restore long-term graft survival. These data suggest that TIM-1 signaling plays a direct role in Breg maintenance and induction both under physiological conditions (in response to ACs) and in response to therapy through TIM-1 ligation. Moreover, they directly demonstrate that the mucin domain regulates TIM-1 signaling.
© Copyright 2015 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.
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9 MeSH Terms
Myoglobin cast nephropathy in a kidney transplant patient with normal creatine kinase.
Oliveira da Fonseca E, Jittirat A, Birdwell KA, Fogo AB
(2015) Am J Kidney Dis 65: 628-31
MeSH Terms: Adult, Biomarkers, Biopsy, Creatine Kinase, Delayed Graft Function, Diagnosis, Differential, Female, Graft Rejection, Graft Survival, Humans, Kidney, Kidney Diseases, Kidney Failure, Chronic, Kidney Transplantation, Myoglobin, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
Delayed graft function in kidney transplant recipients is a known complication associated with increased risk of acute rejection and reduced transplant survival after 1 year. There are multiple risk factors, including prolonged cold ischemia time, donor age, and cause of donor's death. Major causes of delayed graft function are acute kidney injury in the donor, often from prolonged terminal ischemia, reflected by acute tubular injury in the recipient. However, the differential diagnosis of delayed graft function includes acute rejection, recurrence of the primary glomerular diseases, and other less commonly encountered conditions. A transplant kidney biopsy usually is required to elucidate the correct cause and initiate the right treatment, which is crucial for transplant survival. We report a case of a transplant recipient who developed delayed graft function due to an uncommon cause. After correct diagnosis, the patient's transplant function improved.
Copyright © 2015 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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16 MeSH Terms
Brilliant blue FCF as an alternative dye for saphenous vein graft marking: effect on conduit function.
Voskresensky IV, Wise ES, Hocking KM, Li FD, Osgood MJ, Komalavilas P, Brophy C, Cheung-Flynn J
(2014) JAMA Surg 149: 1176-81
MeSH Terms: Analysis of Variance, Animals, Benzenesulfonates, Coloring Agents, Endothelium, Vascular, Graft Survival, Humans, Muscle Contraction, Muscle, Smooth, Vascular, Organ Culture Techniques, Primary Graft Dysfunction, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Saphenous Vein, Vena Cava, Inferior
Show Abstract · Added March 9, 2015
IMPORTANCE - Surgical skin markers are used off-label to mark human saphenous veins (HSVs) to maintain orientation before implantation as aortocoronary or peripheral arterial bypass grafts. These surgical skin markers impair functional responses of the HSV tissue.
OBJECTIVES - To investigate the effect of brilliant blue dye 1 (brilliant blue FCF [for food coloring]; hereinafter, FCF) as a nontoxic alternative marking dye and to determine whether FCF has pharmacological properties.
DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS - Segments of HSVs were collected in university hospitals from patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting procedures immediately after harvest (unmanipulated) or after typical intraoperative surgical graft preparation (after manipulation). Rat inferior venae cavae were used to determine the pharmacological properties and cellular targets of FCF. Endothelial and smooth muscle functional responses were determined in a muscle bath, and intimal thickening in HSVs was determined after 14 days in organ culture.
MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES - Contractile responses were measured in force and converted to stress. Smooth muscle function was expressed as maximal responses to potassium chloride depolarization contractions. Endothelial function was defined as the percentage of relaxation of maximal agonist-induced contraction. Neointimal thickness was measured by histomorphometric analysis.
RESULTS - Human saphenous veins stored in the presence of FCF had no loss of endothelial or smooth muscle function. Unmanipulated HSVs preserved in the presence of FCF demonstrated a significant increase in endothelial-dependent relaxation (mean [SEM], 25.2% [6.4%] vs 30.2% [6.7%]; P = .02). Application of FCF to functionally nonviable tissue significantly enhanced the smooth muscle responses (mean [SEM], 0.018 [0.004] × 10⁵ N/m² vs 0.057 [0.016] × 10⁵ N/m²; P = .05). Treatment with FCF reduced intimal thickness in organ culture (mean [SEM], -17.5% [2.1%] for unmanipulated HSVs vs -27.9% [3.7%] for HSVs after manipulation; P < .001). In rat inferior venae cavae, FCF inhibited the contraction induced by the P2X7 receptor agonist 2'(3')-O-(4-benzoyl)benzoyl-adenosine-5'-triphosphate (mean [SEM], 14.8% [2.2%] vs 6.5% [1.8%]; P = .02) to an extent similar to the P2X7 receptor antagonist oxidized adenosine triphosphate (mean [SEM], 5.0% [0.9%]; P < .02 vs control) or the pannexin hemichannel inhibitor probenecid (mean [SEM], 7.3% [1.6%] and 4.7% [0.9%] for 0.5mM and 2mM, respectively; P < .05).
CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE - Treatment with FCF did not impair endothelial or smooth muscle function in HSVs. Brilliant blue FCF enhanced endothelial-dependent relaxation, restored smooth muscle function, and prevented intimal hyperplasia in HSVs in organ culture. These pharmacological properties of FCF may be due to P2X7 receptor or pannexin channel inhibition. Brilliant blue FCF is an alternative, nontoxic marking dye that may improve HSV conduit function and decrease intimal hyperplasia.
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15 MeSH Terms
Does renal dysfunction and method of bridging support influence heart transplant graft survival?
Haglund NA, Feurer ID, Dwyer JP, Stulak JM, DiSalvo TG, Keebler ME, Schlendorf KH, Wigger MA, Maltais S
(2014) Ann Thorac Surg 98: 835-41
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Cardiotonic Agents, Female, Graft Survival, Heart Failure, Heart Transplantation, Heart-Assist Devices, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Preoperative Care, Renal Insufficiency, Retrospective Studies, Risk Factors, Severity of Illness Index, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added October 28, 2014
BACKGROUND - Renal insufficiency is common in status 1B patients supported with inotropes or a continuous flow left ventricular device (CF-LVAD) as a bridge to heart transplantation. We evaluated the association of renal function and inotrope versus CF-LVAD support on posttransplant graft survival in status 1B patients.
METHODS - The Scientific Registry for Transplant Recipients database was analyzed for posttransplant survival in status 1B patients bridged with inotropes or CF-LVAD who underwent transplantation between 2003 and 2012. Pretransplant renal function was measured by estimating glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and was stratified as less than 45 mL · min(-1) · 1.73 m(-2), 45 to 59, and 60 or greater. Univariate Kaplan-Meier and multivariate Cox regression models were used to evaluate the main effects of GFR strata and inotropes versus CF-LVAD, and the interaction effect of GFR strata by CF-LVAD, on graft survival.
RESULTS - This study included 4,158 status 1B patients (74% male, aged 53 ± 12 years). Of those, 659 patients had a CF-LVAD (HeartMate-II [Thoratec, Pleasanton, CA], n = 638; HVAD [HeartWare, Framingham, MA], n = 21), and 3,530 were receiving inotropes (31 CF-LVAD patients were also receiving inotropes). Kaplan-Meier analyses demonstrated reduced graft survival (p = 0.022) in patients with pretransplant GFR less than 45 versus GFR 45 to 59 (p = 0.062) and versus GFR 60 or greater (p = 0.007), and no effect of inotrope versus CF-LVAD support on graft survival (p = 0.402). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that, after adjusting for the main effects of GFR stratum, CF-LVAD, and inotropes, status 1B patients bridged with a CF-LVAD and GFR in the lowest stratum had reduced graft survival (interaction effect p = 0.040).
CONCLUSIONS - Pretransplant renal insufficiency was associated with reduced posttransplant graft survival in status 1B patients. This risk is increased for patients bridged with a CF-LVAD (versus inotropes) who have GFR in the lowest stratum.
Copyright © 2014 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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18 MeSH Terms
An immunosufficient murine model for the study of human islets.
Zhao G, Moore DJ, Kim JI, Lee KM, O'Connor M, Yang M, Marshall AF, Lei J, Schuetz C, Markmann JF, Deng S
(2014) Xenotransplantation 21: 567-73
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antibodies, Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental, Graft Rejection, Graft Survival, Humans, Islets of Langerhans Transplantation, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Transplantation Tolerance, Transplantation, Heterologous
Show Abstract · Added October 15, 2014
For the sake of therapy of diabetes, it is critical to understand human beta cell function in detail in health and disease. Current studies of human beta cell physiology in vivo are mostly limited to immunodeficient mouse models, which possess significant technical limitations. This study aimed to create a new model for the study of human islets through induction of transplant tolerance in immunosufficient mice. B6 diabetic mice were transplanted with human islets and treated with anti-CD45RB. To assess whether anti-CD45RB-induced transplant tolerance requires B cells, B6 recipients received additional anti-CD20 or B6μMT-/- mice were used. For some anti-CD45RB-treated B6μMT-/- mice, additional anti-CD25 mAb was applied at the early or late stage post-transplant. Immunohistology was performed to show the Foxp3 cells in grafted anti-CD45RB/anti-CD20-treated Foxp3-GFP B6 mice. The results showed that anti-CD45RB alone allowed indefinite graft survival in 26.6% of B6 mice, however 100% of xenografts were accepted in mice treated simultaneously with anti-CD20, and 88.9% of xenografts accepted in anti-CD45RB-treated μMT-/- mice. These μMT-/- mice accepted the islets from another human donor but rejected the islets from baboon. Additional administration of anti-CD25 mAb at the time of transplantation resulted in 100% rejection, whereas 40% of grafts were rejected while the antibody was administrated at days 60 post-transplant. Immunohistologic examination showed Foxp3+ cells accumulated around grafts. We conclude that induction of tolerance to human islets in an immunosufficient mouse model could be generated by targeting murine CD45RB and CD20. This new system will facilitate study of human islets and accelerate the dissection of the critical mechanisms underlying islet health in human disease.
© 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
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10 MeSH Terms
Institutional volume of heart transplantation with left ventricular assist device explantation influences graft survival.
Haglund NA, Feurer ID, Ahmad RM, DiSalvo TG, Lenihan DJ, Keebler ME, Schlendorf KH, Stulak JM, Wigger MA, Maltais S
(2014) J Heart Lung Transplant 33: 931-6
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Device Removal, Female, Graft Rejection, Graft Survival, Heart Failure, Heart Transplantation, Heart-Assist Devices, Hospitals, Low-Volume, Humans, Incidence, Male, Middle Aged, Multivariate Analysis, Registries, Retrospective Studies, Survival Rate, Treatment Outcome, Ventricular Dysfunction, Left, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added February 19, 2015
BACKGROUND - There are increasing numbers of patients undergoing orthotopic heart transplantation (OHT) with left ventricular assist device (LVAD) explantation (LVAD explant-OHT). We hypothesized that LVAD explant-OHT is a more challenging surgical procedure compared to OHT without LVAD explantation and that institutional LVAD explant-OHT procedural volume would be associated with post-transplant graft survival. We sought to assess the impact of institutional volume of LVAD explant-OHT on post-transplant graft survival.
METHODS - This is a retrospective analysis of the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients for adult OHTs with long-term LVAD explantation. LVAD explant-OHT volume was characterized on the basis of the center's year-specific total OHT volume (OHTvol) and year-specific LVAD explant-OHT volume quartile (LVADvolQ). The effect of LVADvolQ on graft survival (death or re-transplantation) was analyzed.
RESULTS - From 2004 to 2011, 2,681 patients underwent OHT with LVAD explantation (740 with HeartMate XVE, 1,877 with HeartMate II and 64 with HeartWare devices). LVAD explant-OHT at centers falling in the lowest LVADvolQ was associated with reduced post-transplant graft survival (p = 0.022). After adjusting for annualized OHTvol (HR = 0.998, 95% CI 0.993 to 1.003, p = 0.515 and pulsatile XVE (HR = 0.842, 95% CI 0.688 to 1.032, p = 0.098), multivariate analysis confirmed a significantly (approximately 37%) increased risk of post-transplant graft failure among explant-OHT procedures occurring at centers in the lowest volume quartile (HR = 1.371, 95% CI 1.030 to 1.825, p = 0.030).
CONCLUSION - Graft survival is decreased when performed at centers falling in the lowest quartile of LVAD explant-OHT for a given year. This volume-survival relationship should be considered in the context of limited donor organ availability and the rapidly growing number of LVAD centers.
Copyright © 2014 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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22 MeSH Terms
Acute decompensation of allograft function in a kidney transplant recipient.
Christopher D, McElmurray JH, Shaffer D, Schaefer HM
(2013) Am J Transplant 13: 3284-5; quiz 3286
MeSH Terms: Angiography, Blood Pressure, Brain Abscess, Graft Survival, Humans, Hypertension, Kidney, Kidney Transplantation, Male, Middle Aged, Polycystic Kidney Diseases, Renal Insufficiency, Seizures
Added February 25, 2014
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13 MeSH Terms
Renal transplantation in the setting of early steroid withdrawal: a comparison of rabbit antithymocyte globulin induction dosing in two eras.
Rogers CC, Asipenko N, Horwedel T, Gautam S, Goldfarb-Rumyantzev AS, Pavlakis M, Johnson SR, Karp SJ, Evenson A, Khwaja K, Hanto DW, Mandelbrot DA
(2013) Am J Nephrol 38: 397-404
MeSH Terms: Aged, Animals, Antilymphocyte Serum, Drug Administration Schedule, Female, Graft Rejection, Graft Survival, Humans, Immunosuppression, Immunosuppressive Agents, Kidney Transplantation, Male, Middle Aged, Multivariate Analysis, Rabbits, Renal Insufficiency, Retrospective Studies, Steroids, Time Factors
Show Abstract · Added May 22, 2014
BACKGROUND - Modern immunosuppression and rabbit antithymocyte globulin (rATG) have facilitated the success of early steroid withdrawal (ESW) protocols. Little data exist on optimal rATG dosing in ESW protocols.
METHODS - Rejection at 12 months in era 1 (four doses of rATG, 1.25 mg/kg) vs. era 2 (three doses of rATG, 1.25 mg/kg) was the primary endpoint. Secondary endpoints included patient and graft survival, renal function and infectious complications. Factors associated with rejection at 1 year were identified.
RESULTS - 199 patients received rATG induction and ESW: 102 in era 1 and 97 in era 2. Compared to era 1, era 2 was not associated with worse outcomes, including rejection, renal function, infection or graft survival. Rejection at 1 year and uncensored graft survival differed between the dosing groups. Rejection rates were significantly higher in the <4 mg/kg group compared to the 4-5.9-mg/kg and the ≥6-mg/kg groups, whereas uncensored graft survival was the lowest in the ≥6-mg/kg group. Factors associated with rejection at 12 months included: rATG dose received of 4-5.9 versus <4 mg/kg (OR 0.20, 95% CI 0.036-0.85, p = 0.026); recipient age (per year, OR 0.94, 95% CI 0.89-1.0, p = 0.038); panel reactive antibody 10-79.9 versus <10% (OR 5.4, 95% CI 1.2-25, p = 0.030) and rATG dose held (OR 4.0, 95% CI 1.0-15, p = 0.049).
CONCLUSIONS - A comparison of rATG dosing based on era did not result in a significant difference in rejection, renal function, infection or graft survival. However, when evaluating the study population based on actual dose received there were notable differences in both rejection rates and uncensored graft survival.
© 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.
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19 MeSH Terms