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Developmental regulation of Wnt signaling by Nagk and the UDP-GlcNAc salvage pathway.
Neitzel LR, Spencer ZT, Nayak A, Cselenyi CS, Benchabane H, Youngblood CQ, Zouaoui A, Ng V, Stephens L, Hann T, Patton JG, Robbins D, Ahmed Y, Lee E
(2019) Mech Dev 156: 20-31
MeSH Terms: Animals, Body Patterning, Drosophila, Embryonic Development, Evolution, Molecular, Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental, Glycosylation, Humans, Phosphotransferases (Alcohol Group Acceptor), Wnt Signaling Pathway, Xenopus laevis, Zebrafish
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2019
In a screen for human kinases that regulate Xenopus laevis embryogenesis, we identified Nagk and other components of the UDP-GlcNAc glycosylation salvage pathway as regulators of anteroposterior patterning and Wnt signaling. We find that the salvage pathway does not affect other major embryonic signaling pathways (Fgf, TGFβ, Notch, or Shh), thereby demonstrating specificity for Wnt signaling. We show that the role of the salvage pathway in Wnt signaling is evolutionarily conserved in zebrafish and Drosophila. Finally, we show that GlcNAc is essential for the growth of intestinal enteroids, which are highly dependent on Wnt signaling for growth and maintenance. We propose that the Wnt pathway is sensitive to alterations in the glycosylation state of a cell and acts as a nutritional sensor in order to couple growth/proliferation with its metabolic status. We also propose that the clinical manifestations observed in congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG) in humans may be due, in part, to their effects on Wnt signaling during development.
Copyright © 2019 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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C Flux Analysis Reveals that Rebalancing Medium Amino Acid Composition can Reduce Ammonia Production while Preserving Central Carbon Metabolism of CHO Cell Cultures.
McAtee Pereira AG, Walther JL, Hollenbach M, Young JD
(2018) Biotechnol J 13: e1700518
MeSH Terms: Amino Acids, Ammonia, Animals, Antibodies, Monoclonal, CHO Cells, Carbon, Cricetulus, Culture Media, Glycosylation, Metabolic Flux Analysis, Recombinant Proteins
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
C metabolic flux analysis (MFA) provides a rigorous approach to quantify intracellular metabolism of industrial cell lines. In this study, C MFA was used to characterize the metabolic response of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells to a novel medium variant designed to reduce ammonia production. Ammonia inhibits growth and viability of CHO cell cultures, alters glycosylation of recombinant proteins, and enhances product degradation. Ammonia production was reduced by manipulating the amino acid composition of the culture medium; specifically, glutamine, glutamate, asparagine, aspartate, and serine levels were adjusted. Parallel C flux analysis experiments determined that, while ammonia production decreased by roughly 40%, CHO cell metabolic phenotype, growth, viability, and monoclonal antibody (mAb) titer were not significantly altered by the changes in media composition. This study illustrates how C flux analysis can be applied to assess the metabolic effects of media manipulations on mammalian cell cultures. The analysis revealed that adjusting the amino acid composition of CHO cell culture media can effectively reduce ammonia production while preserving fluxes throughout central carbon metabolism.
© 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.
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Dynamic Glycosylation Governs the Vertebrate COPII Protein Trafficking Pathway.
Cox NJ, Unlu G, Bisnett BJ, Meister TR, Condon BM, Luo PM, Smith TJ, Hanna M, Chhetri A, Soderblom EJ, Audhya A, Knapik EW, Boyce M
(2018) Biochemistry 57: 91-107
MeSH Terms: Acetylglucosamine, Acylation, Animals, COP-Coated Vesicles, Cell Line, Collagen, Craniofacial Abnormalities, Disease Models, Animal, Glycosylation, Humans, Organelles, Protein Conformation, Protein Processing, Post-Translational, Protein Transport, Vertebrates, Vesicular Transport Proteins, Zebrafish
Show Abstract · Added March 15, 2018
The COPII coat complex, which mediates secretory cargo trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum, is a key control point for subcellular protein targeting. Because misdirected proteins cannot function, protein sorting by COPII is critical for establishing and maintaining normal cell and tissue homeostasis. Indeed, mutations in COPII genes cause a range of human pathologies, including cranio-lenticulo-sutural dysplasia (CLSD), which is characterized by collagen trafficking defects, craniofacial abnormalities, and skeletal dysmorphology. Detailed knowledge of the COPII pathway is required to understand its role in normal cell physiology and to devise new treatments for disorders in which it is disrupted. However, little is known about how vertebrates dynamically regulate COPII activity in response to developmental, metabolic, or pathological cues. Several COPII proteins are modified by O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc), a dynamic form of intracellular protein glycosylation, but the biochemical and functional effects of these modifications remain unclear. Here, we use a combination of chemical, biochemical, cellular, and genetic approaches to demonstrate that site-specific O-GlcNAcylation of COPII proteins mediates their protein-protein interactions and modulates cargo secretion. In particular, we show that individual O-GlcNAcylation sites of SEC23A, an essential COPII component, are required for its function in human cells and vertebrate development, because mutation of these sites impairs SEC23A-dependent in vivo collagen trafficking and skeletogenesis in a zebrafish model of CLSD. Our results indicate that O-GlcNAc is a conserved and critical regulatory modification in the vertebrate COPII-dependent trafficking pathway.
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Quantitative Mass Spectrometry Analysis of PD-L1 Protein Expression, -glycosylation and Expression Stoichiometry with PD-1 and PD-L2 in Human Melanoma.
Morales-Betanzos CA, Lee H, Gonzalez Ericsson PI, Balko JM, Johnson DB, Zimmerman LJ, Liebler DC
(2017) Mol Cell Proteomics 16: 1705-1717
MeSH Terms: Acetylglucosamine, Adult, Aged, B7-H1 Antigen, Biopsy, Cohort Studies, Female, Glycosylation, Humans, Male, Mannose, Mass Spectrometry, Melanoma, Middle Aged, Polysaccharides, Programmed Cell Death 1 Ligand 2 Protein, Programmed Cell Death 1 Receptor, Protein Processing, Post-Translational, Skin Neoplasms, T-Lymphocytes
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Quantitative assessment of key proteins that control the tumor-immune interface is one of the most formidable analytical challenges in immunotherapeutics. We developed a targeted MS platform to quantify programmed cell death-1 (PD-1), programmed cell death 1 ligand 1 (PD-L1), and programmed cell death 1 ligand 2 (PD-L2) at fmol/microgram protein levels in formalin fixed, paraffin-embedded sections from 22 human melanomas. PD-L1 abundance ranged 50-fold, from ∼0.03 to 1.5 fmol/microgram protein and the parallel reaction monitoring (PRM) data were largely concordant with total PD-L1-positive cell content, as analyzed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) with the E1L3N antibody. PD-1 was measured at levels up to 20-fold lower than PD-L1, but the abundances were not significantly correlated (r = 0.062, = 0.264). PD-1 abundance was weakly correlated (r = 0.3057, = 0.009) with the fraction of lymphocytes and histiocytes in sections. PD-L2 was measured from 0.03 to 1.90 fmol/microgram protein and the ratio of PD-L2 to PD-L1 abundance ranged from 0.03 to 2.58. In 10 samples, PD-L2 was present at more than half the level of PD-L1, which suggests that PD-L2, a higher affinity PD-1 ligand, is sufficiently abundant to contribute to T-cell downregulation. We also identified five branched mannose and N-acetylglucosamine glycans at PD-L1 position N192 in all 22 samples. Extent of PD-L1 glycan modification varied by ∼10-fold and the melanoma with the highest PD-L1 protein abundance and most abundant glycan modification yielded a very low PD-L1 IHC estimate, thus suggesting that N-glycosylation may affect IHC measurement and PD-L1 function. Additional PRM analyses quantified immune checkpoint/co-regulator proteins LAG3, IDO1, TIM-3, VISTA, and CD40, which all displayed distinct expression independent of PD-1, PD-L1, and PD-L2. Targeted MS can provide a next-generation analysis platform to advance cancer immuno-therapeutic research and diagnostics.
© 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.
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Quantification of the Impact of the HIV-1-Glycan Shield on Antibody Elicitation.
Zhou T, Doria-Rose NA, Cheng C, Stewart-Jones GBE, Chuang GY, Chambers M, Druz A, Geng H, McKee K, Kwon YD, O'Dell S, Sastry M, Schmidt SD, Xu K, Chen L, Chen RE, Louder MK, Pancera M, Wanninger TG, Zhang B, Zheng A, Farney SK, Foulds KE, Georgiev IS, Joyce MG, Lemmin T, Narpala S, Rawi R, Soto C, Todd JP, Shen CH, Tsybovsky Y, Yang Y, Zhao P, Haynes BF, Stamatatos L, Tiemeyer M, Wells L, Scorpio DG, Shapiro L, McDermott AB, Mascola JR, Kwong PD
(2017) Cell Rep 19: 719-732
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antibodies, Neutralizing, Antibody Specificity, Binding Sites, CD4 Antigens, Crystallography, X-Ray, Epitopes, Glycosylation, Guinea Pigs, HIV Antibodies, HIV-1, Humans, Immunization, Macaca mulatta, Molecular Dynamics Simulation, Polysaccharides, Protein Structure, Quaternary, env Gene Products, Human Immunodeficiency Virus
Show Abstract · Added May 3, 2017
While the HIV-1-glycan shield is known to shelter Env from the humoral immune response, its quantitative impact on antibody elicitation has been unclear. Here, we use targeted deglycosylation to measure the impact of the glycan shield on elicitation of antibodies against the CD4 supersite. We engineered diverse Env trimers with select glycans removed proximal to the CD4 supersite, characterized their structures and glycosylation, and immunized guinea pigs and rhesus macaques. Immunizations yielded little neutralization against wild-type viruses but potent CD4-supersite neutralization (titers 1: >1,000,000 against four-glycan-deleted autologous viruses with over 90% breadth against four-glycan-deleted heterologous strains exhibiting tier 2 neutralization character). To a first approximation, the immunogenicity of the glycan-shielded protein surface was negligible, with Env-elicited neutralization (ID) proportional to the exponential of the protein-surface area accessible to antibody. Based on these high titers and exponential relationship, we propose site-selective deglycosylated trimers as priming immunogens to increase the frequency of site-targeting antibodies.
Published by Elsevier Inc.
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18 MeSH Terms
Coordinated movement, neuromuscular synaptogenesis and trans-synaptic signaling defects in Drosophila galactosemia models.
Jumbo-Lucioni PP, Parkinson WM, Kopke DL, Broadie K
(2016) Hum Mol Genet 25: 3699-3714
MeSH Terms: Animals, Disease Models, Animal, Drosophila, Drosophila Proteins, Galactokinase, Galactosemias, Glycosylation, Humans, Neuromuscular Junction, Synapses, UTP-Hexose-1-Phosphate Uridylyltransferase, Wnt Signaling Pathway
Show Abstract · Added March 29, 2017
The multiple galactosemia disease states manifest long-term neurological symptoms. Galactosemia I results from loss of galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT), which converts galactose-1-phosphate + UDP-glucose to glucose-1-phosphate + UDP-galactose. Galactosemia II results from loss of galactokinase (GALK), phosphorylating galactose to galactose-1-phosphate. Galactosemia III results from the loss of UDP-galactose 4'-epimerase (GALE), which interconverts UDP-galactose and UDP-glucose, as well as UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine and UDP-N-acetylglucosamine. UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (UGP) alternatively makes UDP-galactose from uridine triphosphate and galactose-1-phosphate. All four UDP-sugars are essential donors for glycoprotein biosynthesis with critical roles at the developing neuromuscular synapse. Drosophila galactosemia I (dGALT) and II (dGALK) disease models genetically interact; manifesting deficits in coordinated movement, neuromuscular junction (NMJ) development, synaptic glycosylation, and Wnt trans-synaptic signalling. Similarly, dGALE and dUGP mutants display striking locomotor and NMJ formation defects, including expanded synaptic arbours, glycosylation losses, and differential changes in Wnt trans-synaptic signalling. In combination with dGALT loss, both dGALE and dUGP mutants compromise the synaptomatrix glycan environment that regulates Wnt trans-synaptic signalling that drives 1) presynaptic Futsch/MAP1b microtubule dynamics and 2) postsynaptic Frizzled nuclear import (FNI). Taken together, these findings indicate UDP-sugar balance is a key modifier of neurological outcomes in all three interacting galactosemia disease models, suggest that Futsch homolog MAP1B and the Wnt Frizzled receptor may be disease-relevant targets in epimerase and transferase galactosemias, and identify UGP as promising new potential therapeutic target for galactosemia neuropathology.
© The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.
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Manipulating the NF-κB pathway in macrophages using mannosylated, siRNA-delivering nanoparticles can induce immunostimulatory and tumor cytotoxic functions.
Ortega RA, Barham W, Sharman K, Tikhomirov O, Giorgio TD, Yull FE
(2016) Int J Nanomedicine 11: 2163-77
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bone Marrow Cells, Cell Line, Tumor, Chemokine CXCL9, Female, Glycosylation, Lipids, Macrophages, Mice, Knockout, Mice, Transgenic, NF-KappaB Inhibitor alpha, NF-kappa B, Nanomedicine, Nanoparticles, Neoplasms, Ovarian Neoplasms, RNA, Small Interfering, Signal Transduction, Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2018
Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are critically important in the context of solid tumor progression. Counterintuitively, these host immune cells can often support tumor cells along the path from primary tumor to metastatic colonization and growth. Thus, the ability to transform protumor TAMs into antitumor, immune-reactive macrophages would have significant therapeutic potential. However, in order to achieve these effects, two major hurdles would need to be overcome: development of a methodology to specifically target macrophages and increased knowledge of the optimal targets for cell-signaling modulation. This study addresses both of these obstacles and furthers the development of a therapeutic agent based on this strategy. Using ex vivo macrophages in culture, the efficacy of mannosylated nanoparticles to deliver small interfering RNA specifically to TAMs and modify signaling pathways is characterized. Then, selective small interfering RNA delivery is tested for the ability to inhibit gene targets within the canonical or alternative nuclear factor-kappaB pathways and result in antitumor phenotypes. Results confirm that the mannosylated nanoparticle approach can be used to modulate signaling within macrophages. We also identify appropriate gene targets in critical regulatory pathways. These findings represent an important advance toward the development of a novel cancer therapy that would minimize side effects because of the targeted nature of the intervention and that has rapid translational potential.
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Rearrangement of the Extracellular Domain/Extracellular Loop 1 Interface Is Critical for Thyrotropin Receptor Activation.
Schaarschmidt J, Nagel MB, Huth S, Jaeschke H, Moretti R, Hintze V, von Bergen M, Kalkhof S, Meiler J, Paschke R
(2016) J Biol Chem 291: 14095-108
MeSH Terms: Animals, CHO Cells, Cricetinae, Cricetulus, Glycosylation, Humans, Mass Spectrometry, Models, Molecular, Mutation, Proteolysis, Receptors, Thyrotropin, Surface Plasmon Resonance
Show Abstract · Added April 8, 2017
The thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) with a characteristic large extracellular domain (ECD). TSHR activation is initiated by binding of the hormone ligand TSH to the ECD. How the extracellular binding event triggers the conformational changes in the transmembrane domain (TMD) necessary for intracellular G protein activation is poorly understood. To gain insight in this process, the knowledge on the relative positioning of ECD and TMD and the conformation of the linker region at the interface of ECD and TMD are of particular importance. To generate a structural model for the TSHR we applied an integrated structural biology approach combining computational techniques with experimental data. Chemical cross-linking followed by mass spectrometry yielded 17 unique distance restraints within the ECD of the TSHR, its ligand TSH, and the hormone-receptor complex. These structural restraints generally confirm the expected binding mode of TSH to the ECD as well as the general fold of the domains and were used to guide homology modeling of the ECD. Functional characterization of TSHR mutants confirms the previously suggested close proximity of Ser-281 and Ile-486 within the TSHR. Rigidifying this contact permanently with a disulfide bridge disrupts ligand-induced receptor activation and indicates that rearrangement of the ECD/extracellular loop 1 (ECL1) interface is a critical step in receptor activation. The experimentally verified contact of Ser-281 (ECD) and Ile-486 (TMD) was subsequently utilized in docking homology models of the ECD and the TMD to create a full-length model of a glycoprotein hormone receptor.
© 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.
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Trimeric HIV-1-Env Structures Define Glycan Shields from Clades A, B, and G.
Stewart-Jones GB, Soto C, Lemmin T, Chuang GY, Druz A, Kong R, Thomas PV, Wagh K, Zhou T, Behrens AJ, Bylund T, Choi CW, Davison JR, Georgiev IS, Joyce MG, Kwon YD, Pancera M, Taft J, Yang Y, Zhang B, Shivatare SS, Shivatare VS, Lee CC, Wu CY, Bewley CA, Burton DR, Koff WC, Connors M, Crispin M, Baxa U, Korber BT, Wong CH, Mascola JR, Kwong PD
(2016) Cell 165: 813-26
MeSH Terms: Antibodies, Neutralizing, Antibodies, Viral, Crystallography, X-Ray, Glycosylation, HIV-1, Immune Evasion, Models, Molecular, Molecular Dynamics Simulation, Polysaccharides, env Gene Products, Human Immunodeficiency Virus
Show Abstract · Added May 3, 2017
The HIV-1-envelope (Env) trimer is covered by a glycan shield of ∼90 N-linked oligosaccharides, which comprises roughly half its mass and is a key component of HIV evasion from humoral immunity. To understand how antibodies can overcome the barriers imposed by the glycan shield, we crystallized fully glycosylated Env trimers from clades A, B, and G, visualizing the shield at 3.4-3.7 Å resolution. These structures reveal the HIV-1-glycan shield to comprise a network of interlocking oligosaccharides, substantially ordered by glycan crowding, that encase the protein component of Env and enable HIV-1 to avoid most antibody-mediated neutralization. The revealed features delineate a taxonomy of N-linked glycan-glycan interactions. Crowded and dispersed glycans are differently ordered, conserved, processed, and recognized by antibody. The structures, along with glycan-array binding and molecular dynamics, reveal a diversity in oligosaccharide affinity and a requirement for accommodating glycans among known broadly neutralizing antibodies that target the glycan-shielded trimer.
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Synaptic roles for phosphomannomutase type 2 in a new Drosophila congenital disorder of glycosylation disease model.
Parkinson WM, Dookwah M, Dear ML, Gatto CL, Aoki K, Tiemeyer M, Broadie K
(2016) Dis Model Mech 9: 513-27
MeSH Terms: Animals, Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation, Disease Models, Animal, Down-Regulation, Drosophila, Drosophila Proteins, Extracellular Matrix, Glycoproteins, Glycosylation, Longevity, Movement, Neuromuscular Junction, Oligosaccharides, Phosphotransferases (Phosphomutases), Polysaccharides, Posture, Presynaptic Terminals, Signal Transduction, Synapses, Synaptic Transmission
Show Abstract · Added March 29, 2017
Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDGs) constitute a rapidly growing family of human diseases resulting from heritable mutations in genes driving the production and modification of glycoproteins. The resulting symptomatic hypoglycosylation causes multisystemic defects that include severe neurological impairments, revealing a particularly critical requirement for tightly regulated glycosylation in the nervous system. The most common CDG, CDG-Ia (PMM2-CDG), arises from phosphomannomutase type 2 (PMM2) mutations. Here, we report the generation and characterization of the first Drosophila CDG-Ia model. CRISPR-generated pmm2-null Drosophila mutants display severely disrupted glycosylation and early lethality, whereas RNAi-targeted knockdown of neuronal PMM2 results in a strong shift in the abundance of pauci-mannose glycan, progressive incoordination and later lethality, closely paralleling human CDG-Ia symptoms of shortened lifespan, movement impairments and defective neural development. Analyses of the well-characterized Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ) reveal synaptic glycosylation loss accompanied by defects in both structural architecture and functional neurotransmission. NMJ synaptogenesis is driven by intercellular signals that traverse an extracellular synaptomatrix and are co-regulated by glycosylation and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Specifically, trans-synaptic signaling by the Wnt protein Wingless (Wg) depends on the heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) co-receptor Dally-like protein (Dlp), which is regulated by synaptic MMP activity. Loss of synaptic MMP2, Wg ligand, Dlp co-receptor and downstream trans-synaptic signaling occurs with PMM2 knockdown. Taken together, this Drosophila CDG disease model provides a new avenue for the dissection of cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying neurological impairments and is a means by which to discover and test novel therapeutic treatment strategies.
© 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.
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