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Glucose Regulates Microtubule Disassembly and the Dose of Insulin Secretion via Tau Phosphorylation.
Ho KH, Yang X, Osipovich AB, Cabrera O, Hayashi ML, Magnuson MA, Gu G, Kaverina I
(2020) Diabetes 69: 1936-1947
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cyclic AMP-Dependent Protein Kinases, Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 5, Glucose, Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3, Insulin Secretion, Insulin-Secreting Cells, Mice, Microtubules, Phosphorylation, Protein Kinase C, tau Proteins
Show Abstract · Added July 2, 2020
The microtubule cytoskeleton of pancreatic islet β-cells regulates glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). We have reported that the microtubule-mediated movement of insulin vesicles away from the plasma membrane limits insulin secretion. High glucose-induced remodeling of microtubule network facilitates robust GSIS. This remodeling involves disassembly of old microtubules and nucleation of new microtubules. Here, we examine the mechanisms whereby glucose stimulation decreases microtubule lifetimes in β-cells. Using real-time imaging of photoconverted microtubules, we demonstrate that high levels of glucose induce rapid microtubule disassembly preferentially in the periphery of individual β-cells, and this process is mediated by the phosphorylation of microtubule-associated protein tau. Specifically, high glucose induces tau hyper-phosphorylation via glucose-responsive kinases GSK3, PKA, PKC, and CDK5. This causes dissociation of tau from and subsequent destabilization of microtubules. Consequently, tau knockdown in mouse islet β-cells facilitates microtubule turnover, causing increased basal insulin secretion, depleting insulin vesicles from the cytoplasm, and impairing GSIS. More importantly, tau knockdown uncouples microtubule destabilization from glucose stimulation. These findings suggest that tau suppresses peripheral microtubules turning over to restrict insulin oversecretion in basal conditions and preserve the insulin pool that can be released following stimulation; high glucose promotes tau phosphorylation to enhance microtubule disassembly to acutely enhance GSIS.
© 2020 by the American Diabetes Association.
2 Communities
2 Members
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12 MeSH Terms
Got glycogen? An energy resource in HIF-mediated prevention of ischemic kidney injury.
Haase VH
(2020) Kidney Int 97: 645-647
MeSH Terms: Glycogen, Kidney, Procollagen-Proline Dioxygenase, Prolyl Hydroxylases, Up-Regulation
Show Abstract · Added March 24, 2020
Hypoxia-inducible factor activation reprograms glucose metabolism and leads to glycogen accumulation in multiple cell types. In this issue of Kidney International, Ito and colleagues demonstrate that pharmacologic inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor-prolyl hydroxylase domain oxygen sensors in renal epithelial cells enhances glycogen synthesis and protects from subsequent hypoxia and glucose deprivation. In vivo studies advance the concept that renal glycogen metabolism contributes to cytoprotection afforded by pre-ischemic hypoxia-inducible factor-prolyl hydroxylase domain inhibition.
Copyright © 2020 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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5 MeSH Terms
Metabolic effects of skeletal muscle-specific deletion of beta-arrestin-1 and -2 in mice.
Meister J, Bone DBJ, Godlewski G, Liu Z, Lee RJ, Vishnivetskiy SA, Gurevich VV, Springer D, Kunos G, Wess J
(2019) PLoS Genet 15: e1008424
MeSH Terms: Animals, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Diet, High-Fat, Disease Models, Animal, Glucose, Glucose Clamp Technique, Glycogen, Humans, Insulin, Insulin Resistance, Male, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Muscle, Skeletal, Obesity, Signal Transduction, beta-Arrestin 1, beta-Arrestin 2
Show Abstract · Added March 18, 2020
Type 2 diabetes (T2D) has become a major health problem worldwide. Skeletal muscle (SKM) is the key tissue for whole-body glucose disposal and utilization. New drugs aimed at improving insulin sensitivity of SKM would greatly expand available therapeutic options. β-arrestin-1 and -2 (Barr1 and Barr2, respectively) are two intracellular proteins best known for their ability to mediate the desensitization and internalization of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Recent studies suggest that Barr1 and Barr2 regulate several important metabolic functions including insulin release and hepatic glucose production. Since SKM expresses many GPCRs, including the metabolically important β2-adrenergic receptor, the goal of this study was to examine the potential roles of Barr1 and Barr2 in regulating SKM and whole-body glucose metabolism. Using SKM-specific knockout (KO) mouse lines, we showed that the loss of SKM Barr2, but not of SKM Barr1, resulted in mild improvements in glucose tolerance in diet-induced obese mice. SKM-specific Barr1- and Barr2-KO mice did not show any significant differences in exercise performance. However, lack of SKM Barr2 led to increased glycogen breakdown following a treadmill exercise challenge. Interestingly, mice that lacked both Barr1 and Barr2 in SKM showed no significant metabolic phenotypes. Thus, somewhat surprisingly, our data indicate that SKM β-arrestins play only rather subtle roles (SKM Barr2) in regulating whole-body glucose homeostasis and SKM insulin sensitivity.
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MeSH Terms
Inhibition of Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β as a Treatment for the Prevention of Cognitive Deficits after a Traumatic Brain Injury.
Farr SA, Niehoff ML, Kumar VB, Roby DA, Morley JE
(2019) J Neurotrauma 36: 1869-1875
MeSH Terms: Animals, Brain Injuries, Traumatic, Cognitive Dysfunction, Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 beta, Maze Learning, Mice, Oligonucleotides, Antisense
Show Abstract · Added March 12, 2019
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has many long-term consequences, including impairment in memory and changes in mood. Glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) in its phosphorylated form (p-GSK-3β) is considered to be a major contributor to memory problems that occur post-TBI. We have developed an antisense that targets the GSK-3β (AO) gene. Using a model of closed-head concussive TBI, we subjected mice to TBI and injected AO or a random antisense (AO) 15 min post-injury. One week post-injury, mice were tested in object recognition with 24 h delay. At 4 weeks post- injury, mice were tested with a T-maze foot shock avoidance memory test and a second object recognition test with 24 h delay using different objects. Mice that received AO show improved memory in both object recognition and T-maze compared with AO- treated mice that were subjected to TBI. Next, we verified that AO blocked the surge in phosphorylated GSK-3β post-TBI. Mice were subjected to TBI and injected with antisense 15 min post-TBI with AO or AO. Mice were euthanized at 4 and 72 h post-TBI. Analysis of p-ser9GSK-3β, p-tyr216GSK-3β, and phospho-tau (p-tau) showed that mice that received a TBI+AO had significantly higher p-ser9GSK-3β, p-tyr216GSK-3β, and p-tau levels than the mice that received TBI+AO and the Sham+AO mice. The current finding suggests that inhibiting GSK-3β increase after TBI with an antisense directed at GSK-3β prevents learning and memory impairments.
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7 MeSH Terms
Metabolic network-based predictions of toxicant-induced metabolite changes in the laboratory rat.
Pannala VR, Wall ML, Estes SK, Trenary I, O'Brien TP, Printz RL, Vinnakota KC, Reifman J, Shiota M, Young JD, Wallqvist A
(2018) Sci Rep 8: 11678
MeSH Terms: Acetaminophen, Animals, Animals, Laboratory, Gene Expression Regulation, Glycogenolysis, Liver, Male, Metabolic Flux Analysis, Metabolic Networks and Pathways, Metabolome, Pyruvates, Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Show Abstract · Added March 28, 2019
In order to provide timely treatment for organ damage initiated by therapeutic drugs or exposure to environmental toxicants, we first need to identify markers that provide an early diagnosis of potential adverse effects before permanent damage occurs. Specifically, the liver, as a primary organ prone to toxicants-induced injuries, lacks diagnostic markers that are specific and sensitive to the early onset of injury. Here, to identify plasma metabolites as markers of early toxicant-induced injury, we used a constraint-based modeling approach with a genome-scale network reconstruction of rat liver metabolism to incorporate perturbations of gene expression induced by acetaminophen, a known hepatotoxicant. A comparison of the model results against the global metabolic profiling data revealed that our approach satisfactorily predicted altered plasma metabolite levels as early as 5 h after exposure to 2 g/kg of acetaminophen, and that 10 h after treatment the predictions significantly improved when we integrated measured central carbon fluxes. Our approach is solely driven by gene expression and physiological boundary conditions, and does not rely on any toxicant-specific model component. As such, it provides a mechanistic model that serves as a first step in identifying a list of putative plasma metabolites that could change due to toxicant-induced perturbations.
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12 MeSH Terms
Phosphorylation of XIAP at threonine 180 controls its activity in Wnt signaling.
Ng VH, Hang BI, Sawyer LM, Neitzel LR, Crispi EE, Rose KL, Popay TM, Zhong A, Lee LA, Tansey WP, Huppert S, Lee E
(2018) J Cell Sci 131:
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Motifs, Animals, Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins, Cell Line, Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3, Humans, Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins, Mitochondrial Proteins, Phosphorylation, Protein Binding, Threonine, Wnt Signaling Pathway, Wnt3A Protein, X-Linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein, Xenopus
Show Abstract · Added July 6, 2018
X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) plays an important role in preventing apoptotic cell death. XIAP has been shown to participate in signaling pathways, including Wnt signaling. XIAP regulates Wnt signaling by promoting the monoubiquitylation of the co-repressor Groucho/TLE family proteins, decreasing its affinity for the TCF/Lef family of transcription factors and allowing assembly of transcriptionally active β-catenin-TCF/Lef complexes. We now demonstrate that XIAP is phosphorylated by GSK3 at threonine 180, and that an alanine mutant (XIAP) exhibits decreased Wnt activity compared to wild-type XIAP in cultured human cells and in embryos. Although XIAP ubiquitylates TLE3 at wild-type levels , it exhibits a reduced capacity to ubiquitylate and bind TLE3 in human cells. XIAP binds Smac (also known as DIABLO) and inhibits Fas-induced apoptosis to a similar degree to wild-type XIAP. Our studies uncover a new mechanism by which XIAP is specifically directed towards a Wnt signaling function versus its anti-apoptotic function. These findings have implications for development of anti-XIAP therapeutics for human cancers.
© 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.
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15 MeSH Terms
Introduction to the Thematic Minireview Series: Brain glycogen metabolism.
Carlson GM, Dienel GA, Colbran RJ
(2018) J Biol Chem 293: 7087-7088
MeSH Terms: Brain, Glycogen, Glycogenolysis, Glycolysis, Humans, Review Literature as Topic, Synaptic Transmission
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2018
The synthesis of glycogen allows for efficient intracellular storage of glucose molecules in a soluble form that can be rapidly released to enter glycolysis in response to energy demand. Intensive studies of glucose and glycogen metabolism, predominantly in skeletal muscle and liver, have produced innumerable insights into the mechanisms of hormone action, resulting in the award of several Nobel Prizes over the last one hundred years. Glycogen is actually present in all cells and tissues, albeit at much lower levels than found in muscle or liver. However, metabolic and physiological roles of glycogen in other tissues are poorly understood. This series of Minireviews summarizes what is known about the enzymes involved in brain glycogen metabolism and studies that have linked glycogen metabolism to multiple brain functions involving metabolic communication between astrocytes and neurons. Recent studies unexpectedly linking some forms of epilepsy to mutations in two poorly understood proteins involved in glycogen metabolism are also reviewed.
© 2018 Carlson et al.
0 Communities
1 Members
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7 MeSH Terms
The liver.
Trefts E, Gannon M, Wasserman DH
(2017) Curr Biol 27: R1147-R1151
MeSH Terms: Amino Acids, Animals, Biological Transport, Energy Metabolism, Glucose, Glycogen, Hepatic Stellate Cells, Humans, Kupffer Cells, Lipid Metabolism, Liver, Obesity, Proteins
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
The liver is a critical hub for numerous physiological processes. These include macronutrient metabolism, blood volume regulation, immune system support, endocrine control of growth signaling pathways, lipid and cholesterol homeostasis, and the breakdown of xenobiotic compounds, including many current drugs. Processing, partitioning, and metabolism of macronutrients provide the energy needed to drive the aforementioned processes and are therefore among the liver's most critical functions. Moreover, the liver's capacities to store glucose in the form of glycogen, with feeding, and assemble glucose via the gluconeogenic pathway, in response to fasting, are critical. The liver oxidizes lipids, but can also package excess lipid for secretion to and storage in other tissues, such as adipose. Finally, the liver is a major handler of protein and amino acid metabolism as it is responsible for the majority of proteins secreted in the blood (whether based on mass or range of unique proteins), the processing of amino acids for energy, and disposal of nitrogenous waste from protein degradation in the form of urea metabolism. Over the course of evolution this array of hepatic functions has been consolidated in a single organ, the liver, which is conserved in all vertebrates. Developmentally, this organ arises as a result of a complex differentiation program that is initiated by exogenous signal gradients, cellular localization cues, and an intricate hierarchy of transcription factors. These processes that are fully developed in the mature liver are imperative for life. Liver failure from any number of sources (e.g. viral infection, overnutrition, or oncologic burden) is a global health problem. The goal of this primer is to concisely summarize hepatic functions with respect to macronutrient metabolism. Introducing concepts critical to liver development, organization, and physiology sets the stage for these functions and serves to orient the reader. It is important to emphasize that insight into hepatic pathologies and potential therapeutic avenues to treat these conditions requires an understanding of the development and physiology of specialized hepatic functions.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
1 Communities
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MeSH Terms
Loss of hepatic AMP-activated protein kinase impedes the rate of glycogenolysis but not gluconeogenic fluxes in exercising mice.
Hughey CC, James FD, Bracy DP, Donahue EP, Young JD, Viollet B, Foretz M, Wasserman DH
(2017) J Biol Chem 292: 20125-20140
MeSH Terms: AMP-Activated Protein Kinases, Animals, Energy Metabolism, Gluconeogenesis, Glucose, Glycogenolysis, Homeostasis, Isotope Labeling, Liver, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Physical Conditioning, Animal
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Pathologies including diabetes and conditions such as exercise place an unusual demand on liver energy metabolism, and this demand induces a state of energy discharge. Hepatic AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been proposed to inhibit anabolic processes such as gluconeogenesis in response to cellular energy stress. However, both AMPK activation and glucose release from the liver are increased during exercise. Here, we sought to test the role of hepatic AMPK in the regulation of glucose-producing and citric acid cycle-related fluxes during an acute bout of muscular work. We used H/C metabolic flux analysis to quantify intermediary metabolism fluxes in both sedentary and treadmill-running mice. Additionally, liver-specific AMPK α1 and α2 subunit KO and WT mice were utilized. Exercise caused an increase in endogenous glucose production, glycogenolysis, and gluconeogenesis from phosphoenolpyruvate. Citric acid cycle fluxes, pyruvate cycling, anaplerosis, and cataplerosis were also elevated during this exercise. Sedentary nutrient fluxes in the postabsorptive state were comparable for the WT and KO mice. However, the increment in the endogenous rate of glucose appearance during exercise was blunted in the KO mice because of a diminished glycogenolytic flux. This lower rate of glycogenolysis was associated with lower hepatic glycogen content before the onset of exercise and prompted a reduction in arterial glucose during exercise. These results indicate that liver AMPKα1α2 is required for maintaining glucose homeostasis during an acute bout of exercise.
© 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.
1 Communities
1 Members
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12 MeSH Terms
Glucose autoregulation is the dominant component of the hormone-independent counterregulatory response to hypoglycemia in the conscious dog.
Gregory JM, Rivera N, Kraft G, Winnick JJ, Farmer B, Allen EJ, Donahue EP, Smith MS, Edgerton DS, Williams PE, Cherrington AD
(2017) Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 313: E273-E283
MeSH Terms: Adipose Tissue, Adrenalectomy, Animals, Blood Glucose, Dogs, Gluconeogenesis, Glucose, Glucose Clamp Technique, Homeostasis, Hypoglycemia, Hypoglycemic Agents, Infusions, Intravenous, Insulin, Liver, Liver Glycogen, Muscle, Skeletal, Norepinephrine, Portal Vein, Sympathetic Nervous System
Show Abstract · Added April 23, 2018
The contribution of hormone-independent counterregulatory signals in defense of insulin-induced hypoglycemia was determined in adrenalectomized, overnight-fasted conscious dogs receiving hepatic portal vein insulin infusions at a rate 20-fold basal. Either euglycemia was maintained () or hypoglycemia (≈45 mg/dl) was allowed to occur. There were three hypoglycemic groups: one in which hepatic autoregulation against hypoglycemia occurred in the absence of sympathetic nervous system input (), one in which autoregulation occurred in the presence of norepinephrine (NE) signaling to fat and muscle (), and one in which autoregulation occurred in the presence of NE signaling to fat, muscle, and liver (). Average net hepatic glucose balance (NHGB) during the last hour for was -0.7 ± 0.1, 0.3 ± 0.1 ( < 0.01 vs. ), 0.7 ± 0.1 ( = 0.01 vs. ), and 0.8 ± 0.1 ( = 0.7 vs. ) mg·kg·min, respectively. Hypoglycemia per se () increased NHGB by causing an inhibition of net hepatic glycogen synthesis. NE signaling to fat and muscle () increased NHGB further by mobilizing gluconeogenic precursors resulting in a rise in gluconeogenesis. Lowering glucose per se decreased nonhepatic glucose uptake by 8.9 mg·kg·min, and the addition of increased neural efferent signaling to muscle and fat blocked glucose uptake further by 3.2 mg·kg·min The addition of increased neural efferent input to liver did not affect NHGB or nonhepatic glucose uptake significantly. In conclusion, even in the absence of increases in counterregulatory hormones, the body can defend itself against hypoglycemia using glucose autoregulation and increased neural efferent signaling, both of which stimulate hepatic glucose production and limit glucose utilization.
Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.
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MeSH Terms