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Therapeutic endocannabinoid augmentation for mood and anxiety disorders: comparative profiling of FAAH, MAGL and dual inhibitors.
Bedse G, Bluett RJ, Patrick TA, Romness NK, Gaulden AD, Kingsley PJ, Plath N, Marnett LJ, Patel S
(2018) Transl Psychiatry 8: 92
MeSH Terms: Amidohydrolases, Animals, Anti-Anxiety Agents, Anxiety Disorders, Behavior, Animal, Benzodioxoles, Body Temperature, Brain, Carbamates, Endocannabinoids, Female, Locomotion, Male, Maze Learning, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Inbred ICR, Monoacylglycerol Lipases, Piperazines, Piperidines, Pyridines, Stress, Psychological
Show Abstract · Added April 12, 2019
Recent studies have demonstrated anxiolytic potential of pharmacological endocannabinoid (eCB) augmentation approaches in a variety of preclinical models. Pharmacological inhibition of endocannabinoid-degrading enzymes, such as fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), elicit promising anxiolytic effects in rodent models with limited adverse behavioral effects, however, the efficacy of dual FAAH/MAGL inhibition has not been investigated. In the present study, we compared the effects of FAAH (PF-3845), MAGL (JZL184) and dual FAAH/MAGL (JZL195) inhibitors on (1) anxiety-like behaviors under non-stressed and stressed conditions, (2) locomotor activity and body temperature, (3) lipid levels in the brain and (4) cognitive functions. Behavioral analysis showed that PF-3845 or JZL184, but not JZL195, was able to prevent restraint stress-induced anxiety in the light-dark box assay when administered before stress exposure. Moreover, JZL195 treatment was not able to reverse foot shock-induced anxiety-like behavior in the elevated zero maze or light-dark box. JZL195, but not PF-3845 or JZL184, decreased body temperature and increased anxiety-like behavior in the open-field test. Overall, JZL195 did not show anxiolytic efficacy and the effects of JZL184 were more robust than that of PF-3845 in the models examined. These results showed that increasing either endogenous AEA or 2-AG separately produces anti-anxiety effects under stressful conditions but the same effects are not obtained from simultaneously increasing both AEA and 2-AG.
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Dodecyl-β-melibioside Detergent Micelles as a Medium for Membrane Proteins.
Hutchison JM, Lu Z, Li GC, Travis B, Mittal R, Deatherage CL, Sanders CR
(2017) Biochemistry 56: 5481-5484
MeSH Terms: Amyloid beta-Protein Precursor, Detergents, Diacylglycerol Kinase, Disaccharides, Dynamic Light Scattering, Enzyme Stability, Escherichia coli Proteins, Glucosides, Glycolipids, Hot Temperature, Humans, Micelles, Myelin Proteins, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Biomolecular, Particle Size, Peptide Fragments, Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs, Protein Stability, Receptor, Notch1
Show Abstract · Added November 21, 2018
There remains a need for new non-ionic detergents that are suitable for use in biochemical and biophysical studies of membrane proteins. Here we explore the properties of n-dodecyl-β-melibioside (β-DDMB) micelles as a medium for membrane proteins. Melibiose is d-galactose-α(1→6)-d-glucose. Light scattering showed the β-DDMB micelle to be roughly 30 kDa smaller than micelles formed by the commonly used n-dodecyl-β-maltoside (β-DDM). β-DDMB stabilized diacylglycerol kinase (DAGK) against thermal inactivation. Moreover, activity assays conducted using aliquots of DAGK purified into β-DDMB yielded activities that were 40% higher than those of DAGK purified into β-DDM. β-DDMB yielded similar or better TROSY-HSQC NMR spectra for two single-pass membrane proteins and the tetraspan membrane protein peripheral myelin protein 22. β-DDMB appears be a useful addition to the toolbox of non-ionic detergents available for membrane protein research.
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A pH-Mediated Topological Switch within the N-Terminal Domain of Human Caveolin-3.
Kim JH, Schlebach JP, Lu Z, Peng D, Reasoner KC, Sanders CR
(2016) Biophys J 110: 2475-2485
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Caveolin 3, Circular Dichroism, Humans, Hydrogen-Ion Concentration, Membranes, Artificial, Micelles, Models, Molecular, Mutation, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Biomolecular, Phosphatidylglycerols, Protein Structure, Secondary, Solubility, Solutions
Show Abstract · Added November 21, 2018
Caveolins mediate the formation of caveolae, which are small omega-shaped membrane invaginations involved in a variety of cellular processes. There are three caveolin isoforms, the third of which (Cav3) is expressed in smooth and skeletal muscles. Mutations in Cav3 cause a variety of human muscular diseases. In this work, we characterize the secondary structure, dynamics, and topology of the monomeric form of the full-length lipidated protein. Cav3 consists of a series of membrane-embedded or surface-associated helical elements connected by extramembrane connecting loops or disordered domains. Our results also reveal that the N-terminal domain undergoes a large scale pH-mediated topological rearrangement between soluble and membrane-anchored forms. Considering that roughly one-third of pathogenic mutations in Cav3 influence charged residues located in this domain, we hypothesize that this transition is likely to be relevant to the molecular basis of Cav3-linked diseases. These results provide insight into the structure of Cav3 and set the stage for mechanistic investigations of the effects of pathogenic mutations.
Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Knockdown of triglyceride synthesis does not enhance palmitate lipotoxicity or prevent oleate-mediated rescue in rat hepatocytes.
Leamy AK, Hasenour CM, Egnatchik RA, Trenary IA, Yao CH, Patti GJ, Shiota M, Young JD
(2016) Biochim Biophys Acta 1861: 1005-1014
MeSH Terms: Animals, Apoptosis, Diacylglycerol O-Acyltransferase, Esterification, Gene Knockout Techniques, Hepatocytes, Lipid Metabolism, Lipogenesis, Oleic Acid, Oxidative Stress, Palmitic Acid, Rats, Triglycerides
Show Abstract · Added April 27, 2017
Experiments in a variety of cell types, including hepatocytes, consistently demonstrate the acutely lipotoxic effects of saturated fatty acids, such as palmitate (PA), but not unsaturated fatty acids, such as oleate (OA). PA+OA co-treatment fully prevents PA lipotoxicity through mechanisms that are not well defined but which have been previously attributed to more efficient esterification and sequestration of PA into triglycerides (TGs) when OA is abundant. However, this hypothesis has never been directly tested by experimentally modulating the relative partitioning of PA/OA between TGs and other lipid fates in hepatocytes. In this study, we found that addition of OA to PA-treated hepatocytes enhanced TG synthesis, reduced total PA uptake and PA lipid incorporation, decreased phospholipid saturation and rescued PA-induced ER stress and lipoapoptosis. Knockdown of diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT), the rate-limiting step in TG synthesis, significantly reduced TG accumulation without impairing OA-mediated rescue of PA lipotoxicity. In both wild-type and DGAT-knockdown hepatocytes, OA co-treatment significantly reduced PA lipid incorporation and overall phospholipid saturation compared to PA-treated hepatocytes. These data indicate that OA's protective effects do not require increased conversion of PA into inert TGs, but instead may be due to OA's ability to compete against PA for cellular uptake and/or esterification and, thereby, normalize the composition of cellular lipids in the presence of a toxic PA load.
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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13 MeSH Terms
Ketamine and MAG Lipase Inhibitor-Dependent Reversal of Evolving Depressive-Like Behavior During Forced Abstinence From Alcohol Drinking.
Holleran KM, Wilson HH, Fetterly TL, Bluett RJ, Centanni SW, Gilfarb RA, Rocco LE, Patel S, Winder DG
(2016) Neuropsychopharmacology 41: 2062-71
MeSH Terms: Affect, Alcohol Drinking, Animals, Behavior, Animal, Benzodioxoles, Depression, Endocannabinoids, Ethanol, Excitatory Amino Acid Antagonists, Female, Ketamine, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Monoacylglycerol Lipases, Piperidines
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Although alcoholism and depression are highly comorbid, treatment options that take this into account are lacking, and mouse models of alcohol (ethanol (EtOH)) intake-induced depressive-like behavior have not been well established. Recent studies utilizing contingent EtOH administration through prolonged two-bottle choice access have demonstrated depression-like behavior following EtOH abstinence in singly housed female C57BL/6J mice. In the present study, we found that depression-like behavior in the forced swim test (FST) is revealed only after a protracted (2 weeks), but not acute (24 h), abstinence period. No effect on anxiety-like behavior in the EPM was observed. Further, we found that, once established, the affective disturbance is long-lasting, as we observed significantly enhanced latencies to approach food even 35 days after ethanol withdrawal in the novelty-suppressed feeding test (NSFT). We were able to reverse affective disturbances measured in the NSFT following EtOH abstinence utilizing the N-methyl D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist and antidepressant ketamine but not memantine, another NMDAR antagonist. Pretreatment with the monoacylglycerol (MAG) lipase inhibitor JZL-184 also reduced affective disturbances in the NSFT in ethanol withdrawn mice, and this effect was prevented by co-administration of the CB1 inverse agonist rimonabant. Endocannabinoid levels were decreased within the BLA during abstinence compared with during drinking. Finally, we demonstrate that the depressive behaviors observed do not require a sucrose fade and that this drinking paradigm may favor the development of habit-like EtOH consumption. These data could set the stage for developing novel treatment approaches for alcohol-withdrawal-induced mood and anxiety disorders.
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14 MeSH Terms
Environmental Interactions and Epistasis Are Revealed in the Proteomic Responses to Complex Stimuli.
Samir P, Rahul , Slaughter JC, Link AJ
(2015) PLoS One 10: e0134099
MeSH Terms: Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid, Epistasis, Genetic, Genotype, Glucose, Glycerol, Mass Spectrometry, Proteome, RNA, Messenger, Saccharomyces cerevisiae
Show Abstract · Added February 15, 2016
Ultimately, the genotype of a cell and its interaction with the environment determine the cell's biochemical state. While the cell's response to a single stimulus has been studied extensively, a conceptual framework to model the effect of multiple environmental stimuli applied concurrently is not as well developed. In this study, we developed the concepts of environmental interactions and epistasis to explain the responses of the S. cerevisiae proteome to simultaneous environmental stimuli. We hypothesize that, as an abstraction, environmental stimuli can be treated as analogous to genetic elements. This would allow modeling of the effects of multiple stimuli using the concepts and tools developed for studying gene interactions. Mirroring gene interactions, our results show that environmental interactions play a critical role in determining the state of the proteome. We show that individual and complex environmental stimuli behave similarly to genetic elements in regulating the cellular responses to stimuli, including the phenomena of dominance and suppression. Interestingly, we observed that the effect of a stimulus on a protein is dominant over other stimuli if the response to the stimulus involves the protein. Using publicly available transcriptomic data, we find that environmental interactions and epistasis regulate transcriptomic responses as well.
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9 MeSH Terms
Identification of the major prostaglandin glycerol ester hydrolase in human cancer cells.
Manna JD, Wepy JA, Hsu KL, Chang JW, Cravatt BF, Marnett LJ
(2014) J Biol Chem 289: 33741-53
MeSH Terms: Animals, Arachidonic Acids, Cell Line, Tumor, Cyclooxygenase 2, Endocannabinoids, Escherichia coli, Esters, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Glycerides, Glycerol, Humans, Hydrolysis, Kinetics, Macrophages, Mice, Polyunsaturated Alkamides, Prostaglandins, RNA, Small Interfering, Recombinant Proteins, Signal Transduction, Substrate Specificity, Thiolester Hydrolases
Show Abstract · Added February 22, 2016
Prostaglandin glycerol esters (PG-Gs) are produced as a result of the oxygenation of the endocannabinoid, 2-arachidonoylglycerol, by cyclooxygenase 2. Understanding the role that PG-Gs play in a biological setting has been difficult because of their sensitivity to enzymatic hydrolysis. By comparing PG-G hydrolysis across human cancer cell lines to serine hydrolase activities determined by activity-based protein profiling, we identified lysophospholipase A2 (LYPLA2) as a major enzyme responsible for PG-G hydrolysis. The principal role played by LYPLA2 in PGE2-G hydrolysis was confirmed by siRNA knockdown. Purified recombinant LYPLA2 hydrolyzed PG-Gs in the following order of activity: PGE2-G > PGF2α-G > PGD2-G; LYPLA2 hydrolyzed 1- but not 2-arachidonoylglycerol or arachidonoylethanolamide. Chemical inhibition of LYPLA2 in the mouse macrophage-like cell line, RAW264.7, elicited an increase in PG-G production. Our data indicate that LYPLA2 serves as a major PG-G hydrolase in human cells. Perturbation of this enzyme should enable selective modulation of PG-Gs without alterations in endocannabinoids, thereby providing a means to decipher the unique functions of PG-Gs in biology and disease.
© 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.
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22 MeSH Terms
Structural investigation of the transmembrane domain of KCNE1 in proteoliposomes.
Sahu ID, Kroncke BM, Zhang R, Dunagan MM, Smith HJ, Craig A, McCarrick RM, Sanders CR, Lorigan GA
(2014) Biochemistry 53: 6392-401
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Substitution, Humans, Lipid Bilayers, Liposomes, Molecular Dynamics Simulation, Phosphatidylcholines, Phosphatidylglycerols, Potassium Channels, Voltage-Gated, Protein Structure, Secondary, Protein Structure, Tertiary, Thermodynamics
Show Abstract · Added November 21, 2018
KCNE1 is a single-transmembrane protein of the KCNE family that modulates the function of voltage-gated potassium channels, including KCNQ1. Hereditary mutations in KCNE1 have been linked to diseases such as long QT syndrome (LQTS), atrial fibrillation, sudden infant death syndrome, and deafness. The transmembrane domain (TMD) of KCNE1 plays a key role in mediating the physical association with KCNQ1 and in subsequent modulation of channel gating kinetics and conductance. However, the mechanisms associated with these roles for the TMD remain poorly understood, highlighting a need for experimental structural studies. A previous solution NMR study of KCNE1 in LMPG micelles revealed a curved transmembrane domain, a structural feature proposed to be critical to KCNE1 function. However, this curvature potentially reflects an artifact of working in detergent micelles. Double electron electron resonance (DEER) measurements were conducted on KCNE1 in LMPG micelles, POPC/POPG proteoliposomes, and POPC/POPG lipodisq nanoparticles to directly compare the structure of the TMD in a variety of different membrane environments. Experimentally derived DEER distances coupled with simulated annealing molecular dynamic simulations were used to probe the bilayer structure of the TMD of KCNE1. The results indicate that the structure is helical in proteoliposomes and is slightly curved, which is consistent with the previously determined solution NMR structure in micelles. The evident resilience of the curvature in the KCNE1 TMD leads us to hypothesize that the curvature is likely to be maintained upon binding of the protein to the KCNQ1 channel.
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Hepatic glucose uptake and disposition during short-term high-fat vs. high-fructose feeding.
Coate KC, Kraft G, Moore MC, Smith MS, Ramnanan C, Irimia JM, Roach PJ, Farmer B, Neal DW, Williams P, Cherrington AD
(2014) Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 307: E151-60
MeSH Terms: Animals, Blood Glucose, Diet, High-Fat, Dietary Carbohydrates, Dietary Fats, Dogs, Fructose, Glucokinase, Glucose, Glycerol, Lactic Acid, Liver, Male, Triglycerides
Show Abstract · Added June 2, 2014
In dogs consuming a high-fat and -fructose diet (52 and 17% of total energy, respectively) for 4 wk, hepatic glucose uptake (HGU) in response to hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, and portal glucose delivery is markedly blunted with reduction in glucokinase (GK) protein and glycogen synthase (GS) activity. The present study compared the impact of selective increases in dietary fat and fructose on liver glucose metabolism. Dogs consumed weight-maintaining chow (CTR) or hypercaloric high-fat (HFA) or high-fructose (HFR) diets diet for 4 wk before undergoing clamp studies with infusion of somatostatin and intraportal insulin (3-4 times basal) and glucagon (basal). The hepatic glucose load (HGL) was doubled during the clamp using peripheral vein (Pe) glucose infusion in the first 90 min (P1) and portal vein (4 mg·kg(-1)·min(-1)) plus Pe glucose infusion during the final 90 min (P2). During P2, HGU was 2.8 ± 0.2, 1.0 ± 0.2, and 0.8 ± 0.2 mg·kg(-1)·min(-1) in CTR, HFA, and HFR, respectively (P < 0.05 for HFA and HFR vs. CTR). Compared with CTR, hepatic GK protein and catalytic activity were reduced (P < 0.05) 35 and 56%, respectively, in HFA, and 53 and 74%, respectively, in HFR. Liver glycogen concentrations were 20 and 38% lower in HFA and HFR than CTR (P < 0.05). Hepatic Akt phosphorylation was decreased (P < 0.05) in HFA (21%) but not HFR. Thus, HFR impaired hepatic GK and glycogen more than HFA, whereas HFA reduced insulin signaling more than HFR. HFA and HFR effects were not additive, suggesting that they act via the same mechanism or their effects converge at a saturable step.
Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.
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4 Members
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14 MeSH Terms
Estrogen signaling prevents diet-induced hepatic insulin resistance in male mice with obesity.
Zhu L, Martinez MN, Emfinger CH, Palmisano BT, Stafford JM
(2014) Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 306: E1188-97
MeSH Terms: Animals, Diacylglycerol O-Acyltransferase, Diet, High-Fat, Estrogen Receptor alpha, Estrogens, Female, Insulin Resistance, Liver, Male, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Obesity, Sex Factors, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added May 29, 2014
The development of insulin resistance in the liver is a key event that drives dyslipidemia and predicts diabetes and cardiovascular risk with obesity. Clinical data show that estrogen signaling in males helps prevent adiposity and insulin resistance, which may be mediated through estrogen receptor-α (ERα). The tissues and pathways that mediate the benefits of estrogen signaling in males with obesity are not well defined. In female mice, ERα signaling in the liver helps to correct pathway-selective insulin resistance with estrogen treatment after ovariectomy. We assessed the importance of liver estrogen signaling in males using liver ERα-knockout (LKO) mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD). We found that the LKO male mice had decreased insulin sensitivity compared with their wild-type floxed (fl/fl) littermates during hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamps. Insulin failed to suppress endogenous glucose production in LKO mice, indicating liver insulin resistance. Insulin promoted glucose disappearance in LKO and fl/fl mice similarly. In the liver, insulin failed to induce phosphorylation of Akt-Ser(473) and exclude FOXO1 from the nucleus in LKO mice, a pathway important for liver glucose and lipid metabolism. Liver triglycerides and diacylglycerides were also increased in LKO mice, which corresponded with dysregulation of insulin-stimulated ACC phosphorylation and DGAT1/2 protein levels. Our studies demonstrate that estrogen signaling through ERα in the liver helps prevent whole body and hepatic insulin resistance associated with HFD feeding in males. Augmenting hepatic estrogen signaling through ERα may lessen the impact of obesity on diabetes and cardiovascular risk in males.
Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.
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14 MeSH Terms