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Identical and Nonidentical Twins: Risk and Factors Involved in Development of Islet Autoimmunity and Type 1 Diabetes.
Triolo TM, Fouts A, Pyle L, Yu L, Gottlieb PA, Steck AK, Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet Study Group
(2019) Diabetes Care 42: 192-199
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Autoantibodies, Autoimmunity, Child, Child, Preschool, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1, Disease Progression, Diseases in Twins, Environment, Female, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Glutamate Decarboxylase, Humans, Insulin, Islets of Langerhans, Male, Mass Screening, Risk Factors, Seroepidemiologic Studies, Siblings, Twins, Twins, Dizygotic, Twins, Monozygotic, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added August 15, 2018
OBJECTIVE - There are variable reports of risk of concordance for progression to islet autoantibodies and type 1 diabetes in identical twins after one twin is diagnosed. We examined development of positive autoantibodies and type 1 diabetes and the effects of genetic factors and common environment on autoantibody positivity in identical twins, nonidentical twins, and full siblings.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - Subjects from the TrialNet Pathway to Prevention Study ( = 48,026) were screened from 2004 to 2015 for islet autoantibodies (GAD antibody [GADA], insulinoma-associated antigen 2 [IA-2A], and autoantibodies against insulin [IAA]). Of these subjects, 17,226 (157 identical twins, 283 nonidentical twins, and 16,786 full siblings) were followed for autoantibody positivity or type 1 diabetes for a median of 2.1 years.
RESULTS - At screening, identical twins were more likely to have positive GADA, IA-2A, and IAA than nonidentical twins or full siblings (all < 0.0001). Younger age, male sex, and genetic factors were significant factors for expression of IA-2A, IAA, one or more positive autoantibodies, and two or more positive autoantibodies (all ≤ 0.03). Initially autoantibody-positive identical twins had a 69% risk of diabetes by 3 years compared with 1.5% for initially autoantibody-negative identical twins. In nonidentical twins, type 1 diabetes risk by 3 years was 72% for initially multiple autoantibody-positive, 13% for single autoantibody-positive, and 0% for initially autoantibody-negative nonidentical twins. Full siblings had a 3-year type 1 diabetes risk of 47% for multiple autoantibody-positive, 12% for single autoantibody-positive, and 0.5% for initially autoantibody-negative subjects.
CONCLUSIONS - Risk of type 1 diabetes at 3 years is high for initially multiple and single autoantibody-positive identical twins and multiple autoantibody-positive nonidentical twins. Genetic predisposition, age, and male sex are significant risk factors for development of positive autoantibodies in twins.
© 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.
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25 MeSH Terms
Competition between the Brain and Testes under Selenium-Compromised Conditions: Insight into Sex Differences in Selenium Metabolism and Risk of Neurodevelopmental Disease.
Pitts MW, Kremer PM, Hashimoto AC, Torres DJ, Byrns CN, Williams CS, Berry MJ
(2015) J Neurosci 35: 15326-38
MeSH Terms: Age Factors, Animals, Brain, Castration, Dizocilpine Maleate, Epilepsy, Reflex, Exploratory Behavior, Female, Gene Expression Regulation, Glutamate Decarboxylase, Lyases, Male, Maze Learning, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Transgenic, Motor Activity, Nerve Tissue Proteins, Neurodevelopmental Disorders, Selenium, Selenoprotein P, Sex Factors, Transcription Factors
Show Abstract · Added March 29, 2016
UNLABELLED - Selenium (Se) is essential for both brain development and male fertility. Male mice lacking two key genes involved in Se metabolism (Scly(-/-)Sepp1(-/-) mice), selenoprotein P (Sepp1) and Sec lyase (Scly), develop severe neurological dysfunction, neurodegeneration, and audiogenic seizures that manifest beginning in early adulthood. We demonstrate that prepubescent castration of Scly(-/-)Sepp1(-/-) mice prevents behavioral deficits, attenuates neurodegeneration, rescues maturation of GABAergic inhibition, and increases brain selenoprotein levels. Moreover, castration also yields similar neuroprotective benefits to Sepp1(-/-) and wild-type mice challenged with Se-deficient diets. Our data show that, under Se-compromised conditions, the brain and testes compete for Se utilization, with concomitant effects on neurodevelopment and neurodegeneration.
SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT - Selenium is an essential trace element that promotes male fertility and brain function. Herein, we report that prepubescent castration provides neuroprotection by increasing selenium-dependent antioxidant activity in the brain, revealing a competition between the brain and testes for selenium utilization. These findings provide novel insight into the interaction of sex and oxidative stress upon the developing brain and have potentially significant implications for the prevention of neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by aberrant excitatory/inhibitory balance, such as schizophrenia and epilepsy.
Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/3515326-13$15.00/0.
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23 MeSH Terms
Inhibition of parvalbumin-expressing interneurons results in complex behavioral changes.
Brown JA, Ramikie TS, Schmidt MJ, Báldi R, Garbett K, Everheart MG, Warren LE, Gellért L, Horváth S, Patel S, Mirnics K
(2015) Mol Psychiatry 20: 1499-507
MeSH Terms: Animals, Behavior, Animal, Brain, Disease Models, Animal, Electrophysiology, Exploratory Behavior, Fear, Gene Silencing, Glutamate Decarboxylase, Interneurons, Ketamine, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C3H, Mice, Transgenic, Parvalbumins, Receptors, N-Methyl-D-Aspartate, Schizophrenia, Sensory Gating, Synaptic Transmission
Show Abstract · Added February 12, 2015
Reduced expression of the Gad1 gene-encoded 67-kDa protein isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD67) is a hallmark of schizophrenia. GAD67 downregulation occurs in multiple interneuronal sub-populations, including the parvalbumin-positive (PVALB+) cells. To investigate the role of the PV-positive GABAergic interneurons in behavioral and molecular processes, we knocked down the Gad1 transcript using a microRNA engineered to target specifically Gad1 mRNA under the control of Pvalb bacterial artificial chromosome. Verification of construct expression was performed by immunohistochemistry. Follow-up electrophysiological studies revealed a significant reduction in γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) release probability without alterations in postsynaptic membrane properties or changes in glutamatergic release probability in the prefrontal cortex pyramidal neurons. Behavioral characterization of our transgenic (Tg) mice uncovered that the Pvalb/Gad1 Tg mice have pronounced sensorimotor gating deficits, increased novelty-seeking and reduced fear extinction. Furthermore, NMDA (N-methyl-d-aspartate) receptor antagonism by ketamine had an opposing dose-dependent effect, suggesting that the differential dosage of ketamine might have divergent effects on behavioral processes. All behavioral studies were validated using a second cohort of animals. Our results suggest that reduction of GABAergic transmission from PVALB+ interneurons primarily impacts behavioral domains related to fear and novelty seeking and that these alterations might be related to the behavioral phenotype observed in schizophrenia.
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20 MeSH Terms
Loss of dopamine D2 receptors increases parvalbumin-positive interneurons in the anterior cingulate cortex.
Graham DL, Durai HH, Garden JD, Cohen EL, Echevarria FD, Stanwood GD
(2015) ACS Chem Neurosci 6: 297-305
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Count, Depression, Emotions, Female, GABAergic Neurons, Glutamate Decarboxylase, Green Fluorescent Proteins, Gyrus Cinguli, Immunohistochemistry, In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence, Interneurons, Male, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Mice, Transgenic, Neuropsychological Tests, Parvalbumins, Receptors, Dopamine D2
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
Disruption to dopamine homeostasis during brain development has been implicated in a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders, including depression and schizophrenia. Inappropriate expression or activity of GABAergic interneurons are common features of many of these disorders. We discovered a persistent upregulation of GAD67+ and parvalbumin+ neurons within the anterior cingulate cortex of dopamine D2 receptor knockout mice, while other GABAergic interneuron markers were unaffected. Interneuron distribution and number were not altered in the striatum or in the dopamine-poor somatosensory cortex. The changes were already present by postnatal day 14, indicating a developmental etiology. D2eGFP BAC transgenic mice demonstrated the presence of D2 receptor expression within a subset of parvalbumin-expressing cortical interneurons, suggesting the possibility of a direct cellular mechanism through which D2 receptor stimulation regulates interneuron differentiation or survival. D2 receptor knockout mice also exhibited decreased depressive-like behavior compared with wild-type controls in the tail suspension test. These data indicate that dopamine signaling modulates interneuron number and emotional behavior and that developmental D2 receptor loss or blockade could reveal a potential mechanism for the prodromal basis of neuropsychiatric disorders.
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19 MeSH Terms
Strain- and age-dependent hippocampal neuron sodium currents correlate with epilepsy severity in Dravet syndrome mice.
Mistry AM, Thompson CH, Miller AR, Vanoye CG, George AL, Kearney JA
(2014) Neurobiol Dis 65: 1-11
MeSH Terms: Age Factors, Animals, Animals, Newborn, Cells, Cultured, Disease Models, Animal, Electric Stimulation, Epilepsies, Myoclonic, Female, Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein, Glutamate Decarboxylase, Heterozygote, Hippocampus, In Vitro Techniques, Male, Membrane Potentials, Mice, Mice, Transgenic, NAV1.1 Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel, Nerve Tissue Proteins, Neurons
Show Abstract · Added May 27, 2014
Heterozygous loss-of-function SCN1A mutations cause Dravet syndrome, an epileptic encephalopathy of infancy that exhibits variable clinical severity. We utilized a heterozygous Scn1a knockout (Scn1a(+/-)) mouse model of Dravet syndrome to investigate the basis for phenotype variability. These animals exhibit strain-dependent seizure severity and survival. Scn1a(+/-) mice on strain 129S6/SvEvTac (129.Scn1a(+/-)) have no overt phenotype and normal survival compared with Scn1a(+/-) mice bred to C57BL/6J (F1.Scn1a(+/-)) that have severe epilepsy and premature lethality. We tested the hypothesis that strain differences in sodium current (INa) density in hippocampal neurons contribute to these divergent phenotypes. Whole-cell voltage-clamp recording was performed on acutely-dissociated hippocampal neurons from postnatal days 21-24 (P21-24) 129.Scn1a(+/-) or F1.Scn1a(+/-) mice and wild-type littermates. INa density was lower in GABAergic interneurons from F1.Scn1a(+/-) mice compared to wild-type littermates, while on the 129 strain there was no difference in GABAergic interneuron INa density between 129.Scn1a(+/-) mice and wild-type littermate controls. By contrast, INa density was elevated in pyramidal neurons from both 129.Scn1a(+/-) and F1.Scn1a(+/-) mice, and was correlated with more frequent spontaneous action potential firing in these neurons, as well as more sustained firing in F1.Scn1a(+/-) neurons. We also observed age-dependent differences in pyramidal neuron INa density between wild-type and Scn1a(+/-) animals. We conclude that preserved INa density in GABAergic interneurons contributes to the milder phenotype of 129.Scn1a(+/-) mice. Furthermore, elevated INa density in excitatory pyramidal neurons at P21-24 correlates with age-dependent onset of lethality in F1.Scn1a(+/-) mice. Our findings illustrate differences in hippocampal neurons that may underlie strain- and age-dependent phenotype severity in a Dravet syndrome mouse model, and emphasize a contribution of pyramidal neuron excitability.
Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
1 Communities
1 Members
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20 MeSH Terms
GABAergic circuit dysfunction in the Drosophila Fragile X syndrome model.
Gatto CL, Pereira D, Broadie K
(2014) Neurobiol Dis 65: 142-59
MeSH Terms: Animals, Animals, Genetically Modified, Association Learning, Calcium Signaling, Cell Count, Disease Models, Animal, Drosophila, Drosophila Proteins, Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein, Fragile X Syndrome, Gene Expression Regulation, Glutamate Decarboxylase, Green Fluorescent Proteins, Luminescent Proteins, Mushroom Bodies, Nerve Net, Olfactory Bulb, Synapses, Time Factors, gamma-Aminobutyric Acid
Show Abstract · Added March 29, 2017
Fragile X syndrome (FXS), caused by loss of FMR1 gene function, is the most common heritable cause of intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorders. The FMR1 protein (FMRP) translational regulator mediates activity-dependent control of synapses. In addition to the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) hyperexcitation FXS theory, the GABA theory postulates that hypoinhibition is causative for disease state symptoms. Here, we use the Drosophila FXS model to assay central brain GABAergic circuitry, especially within the Mushroom Body (MB) learning center. All 3 GABAA receptor (GABAAR) subunits are reportedly downregulated in dfmr1 null brains. We demonstrate parallel downregulation of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), the rate-limiting GABA synthesis enzyme, although GABAergic cell numbers appear unaffected. Mosaic analysis with a repressible cell marker (MARCM) single-cell clonal studies show that dfmr1 null GABAergic neurons innervating the MB calyx display altered architectural development, with early underdevelopment followed by later overelaboration. In addition, a new class of extra-calyx terminating GABAergic neurons is shown to include MB intrinsic α/β Kenyon Cells (KCs), revealing a novel level of MB inhibitory regulation. Functionally, dfmr1 null GABAergic neurons exhibit elevated calcium signaling and altered kinetics in response to acute depolarization. To test the role of these GABAergic changes, we attempted to pharmacologically restore GABAergic signaling and assay effects on the compromised MB-dependent olfactory learning in dfmr1 mutants, but found no improvement. Our results show that GABAergic circuit structure and function are impaired in the FXS disease state, but that correction of hypoinhibition alone is not sufficient to rescue a behavioral learning impairment.
Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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20 MeSH Terms
Modulation of behavioral networks by selective interneuronal inactivation.
Schmidt MJ, Horvath S, Ebert P, Norris JL, Seeley EH, Brown J, Gellert L, Everheart M, Garbett KA, Grice TW, Caprioli RM, Mirnics K
(2014) Mol Psychiatry 19: 580-7
MeSH Terms: Amphetamine, Animals, Anxiety, Behavior, Brain, Central Nervous System Stimulants, Cholecystokinin, Glutamate Decarboxylase, Interneurons, Male, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Transgenic, Motor Activity, Neuropeptide Y, Olfactory Perception, Proteomics, Social Behavior, gamma-Aminobutyric Acid
Show Abstract · Added March 20, 2014
Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic disturbances are hallmark features of schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric disorders and encompass multiple interneuronal cell types. Using bacterial artificial chromosome-driven, miRNA silencing technology we generated transgenic mouse lines that suppress glutamic acid decarboxylase 1 (GAD1) in either cholecystokinin (CCK)- or neuropeptide Y (NPY)-expressing interneurons. In situ lipidomic and proteomic analyses on brain tissue sections revealed distinct, brain region-specific profiles in each transgenic line. Behavioral analyses revealed that suppression of GAD1 in CCK+ interneurons resulted in locomotor and olfactory sensory changes, whereas suppression in NPY+ interneurons affected anxiety-related behaviors and social interaction. Both transgenic mouse lines had altered sensitivity to amphetamine albeit in opposite directions. Together, these data argue that reduced GAD1 expression leads to altered molecular and behavioral profiles in a cell type-dependent manner, and that these subpopulations of interneurons are strong and opposing modulators of dopamine system function. Furthermore, our findings also support the hypothesis that neuronal networks are differentially controlled by diverse inhibitory subnetworks.
2 Communities
3 Members
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18 MeSH Terms
The role of cannabinoid 1 receptor expressing interneurons in behavior.
Brown JA, Horváth S, Garbett KA, Schmidt MJ, Everheart M, Gellért L, Ebert P, Mirnics K
(2014) Neurobiol Dis 63: 210-21
MeSH Terms: Amphetamine, Analgesics, Animals, Behavior, Animal, Brain, Central Nervous System Stimulants, Conditioning (Psychology), Cyclohexanols, Exploratory Behavior, Glutamate Decarboxylase, Interneurons, Locomotion, Mice, Mice, Transgenic, Mutation, Neuropeptide Y, RNA, Messenger, Receptor, Cannabinoid, CB1, Sensory Gating
Show Abstract · Added May 19, 2014
Schizophrenia is a devastating neurodevelopmental disorder that affects approximately 1% of the population. Reduced expression of the 67-kDa protein isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD67) is a hallmark of the disease and is encoded by the GAD1 gene. In schizophrenia, GAD67 downregulation occurs in multiple interneuronal subpopulations, including the cannabinoid receptor type 1 positive (CNR1+) cells, but the functional consequences of these disturbances are not well understood. To investigate the role of the CNR1-positive GABA-ergic interneurons in behavioral and molecular processes, we employed a novel, miRNA-mediated transgenic mouse approach. We silenced the Gad1 transcript using a miRNA engineered to specifically target Gad1 mRNA under the control of Cnr1 bacterial artificial chromosome. Behavioral characterization of our transgenic mice showed elevated and persistent conditioned fear associated with an auditory cue and a significantly altered response to an amphetamine challenge. These deficits could not be attributed to sensory deficits or changes in baseline learning and memory. Furthermore, HPLC analyses revealed that Cnr1/Gad1 mice have enhanced serotonin levels, but not dopamine levels in response to amphetamine. Our findings demonstrate that dysfunction of a small subset of interneurons can have a profound effect on behavior and that the GABA-ergic, monoamine, and cannabinoid systems are functionally interconnected. The results also suggest that understanding the function of various interneuronal subclasses might be essential to develop knowledge-based treatment strategies for various mental disorders including schizophrenia and substance abuse.
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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19 MeSH Terms
Conserved chromosome 2q31 conformations are associated with transcriptional regulation of GAD1 GABA synthesis enzyme and altered in prefrontal cortex of subjects with schizophrenia.
Bharadwaj R, Jiang Y, Mao W, Jakovcevski M, Dincer A, Krueger W, Garbett K, Whittle C, Tushir JS, Liu J, Sequeira A, Vawter MP, Gardner PD, Casaccia P, Rasmussen T, Bunney WE, Mirnics K, Futai K, Akbarian S
(2013) J Neurosci 33: 11839-51
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antipsychotic Agents, Cells, Cultured, Chromosomes, Human, Pair 2, Clozapine, DNA Methylation, Down-Regulation, Fibroblasts, Gene Expression Regulation, Glutamate Decarboxylase, Haloperidol, Hippocampus, Histones, Humans, Mice, Mice, Transgenic, Neurons, Prefrontal Cortex, Schizophrenia
Show Abstract · Added May 19, 2014
Little is known about chromosomal loopings involving proximal promoter and distal enhancer elements regulating GABAergic gene expression, including changes in schizophrenia and other psychiatric conditions linked to altered inhibition. Here, we map in human chromosome 2q31 the 3D configuration of 200 kb of linear sequence encompassing the GAD1 GABA synthesis enzyme gene locus, and we describe a loop formation involving the GAD1 transcription start site and intergenic noncoding DNA elements facilitating reporter gene expression. The GAD1-TSS(-50kbLoop) was enriched with nucleosomes epigenetically decorated with the transcriptional mark, histone H3 trimethylated at lysine 4, and was weak or absent in skin fibroblasts and pluripotent stem cells compared with neuronal cultures differentiated from them. In the prefrontal cortex of subjects with schizophrenia, GAD1-TSS(-50kbLoop) was decreased compared with controls, in conjunction with downregulated GAD1 expression. We generated transgenic mice expressing Gad2 promoter-driven green fluorescent protein-conjugated histone H2B and confirmed that Gad1-TSS(-55kbLoop), the murine homolog to GAD1-TSS(-50kbLoop), is a chromosomal conformation specific for GABAergic neurons. In primary neuronal culture, Gad1-TSS(-55kbLoop) and Gad1 expression became upregulated when neuronal activity was increased. We conclude that 3D genome architectures, including chromosomal loopings for promoter-enhancer interactions involved in the regulation of GABAergic gene expression, are conserved between the rodent and primate brain, and subject to developmental and activity-dependent regulation, and disordered in some cases with schizophrenia. More broadly, the findings presented here draw a connection between noncoding DNA, spatial genome architecture, and neuronal plasticity in development and disease.
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19 MeSH Terms
Modeling interneuron dysfunction in schizophrenia.
Schmidt MJ, Mirnics K
(2012) Dev Neurosci 34: 152-8
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cerebral Cortex, Disease Models, Animal, Glutamate Decarboxylase, Interneurons, Mice, Rats, Schizophrenia, gamma-Aminobutyric Acid
Show Abstract · Added May 19, 2014
Schizophrenia is a debilitating neurodevelopmental disorder affecting approximately 1% of the population and imposing a significant burden on society. One of the most replicated and well-established postmortem findings is a deficit in the expression of the gene encoding the 67-kDa isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD67), the primary GABA-producing enzyme in the brain. GAD67 is expressed in various classes of interneurons, with vastly different morphological, molecular, and physiological properties. Importantly, GABA system deficits in schizophrenia encompass multiple interneuronal subtypes, raising several important questions. First, do different classes of interneurons regulate different aspects of behavior? Second, can we model cell-type-specific GABAergic deficits in mice, and will the rodent findings translate to human physiology? Finally, will this knowledge open the door to knowledge-based approaches to treat schizophrenia?
Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.
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9 MeSH Terms