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The Pdx1-Bound Swi/Snf Chromatin Remodeling Complex Regulates Pancreatic Progenitor Cell Proliferation and Mature Islet β-Cell Function.
Spaeth JM, Liu JH, Peters D, Guo M, Osipovich AB, Mohammadi F, Roy N, Bhushan A, Magnuson MA, Hebrok M, Wright CVE, Stein R
(2019) Diabetes 68: 1806-1818
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Proliferation, Chromatin Assembly and Disassembly, DNA Helicases, Gene Expression Regulation, Glucose Intolerance, Homeodomain Proteins, Insulin, Insulin-Secreting Cells, Mice, Mice, Transgenic, Nuclear Proteins, Pancreas, Trans-Activators, Transcription Factors
Show Abstract · Added June 28, 2019
Transcription factors positively and/or negatively impact gene expression by recruiting coregulatory factors, which interact through protein-protein binding. Here we demonstrate that mouse pancreas size and islet β-cell function are controlled by the ATP-dependent Swi/Snf chromatin remodeling coregulatory complex that physically associates with Pdx1, a diabetes-linked transcription factor essential to pancreatic morphogenesis and adult islet cell function and maintenance. Early embryonic deletion of just the Swi/Snf Brg1 ATPase subunit reduced multipotent pancreatic progenitor cell proliferation and resulted in pancreas hypoplasia. In contrast, removal of both Swi/Snf ATPase subunits, Brg1 and Brm, was necessary to compromise adult islet β-cell activity, which included whole-animal glucose intolerance, hyperglycemia, and impaired insulin secretion. Notably, lineage-tracing analysis revealed Swi/Snf-deficient β-cells lost the ability to produce the mRNAs for and other key metabolic genes without effecting the expression of many essential islet-enriched transcription factors. Swi/Snf was necessary for Pdx1 to bind to the gene enhancer, demonstrating the importance of this association in mediating chromatin accessibility. These results illustrate how fundamental the Pdx1:Swi/Snf coregulator complex is in the pancreas, and we discuss how disrupting their association could influence type 1 and type 2 diabetes susceptibility.
© 2019 by the American Diabetes Association.
1 Communities
3 Members
0 Resources
15 MeSH Terms
Impaired insulin signaling in the B10.D2--/oSnJ mouse model of complement factor 5 deficiency.
Peterson KR, Gutierrez DA, Kikuchi T, Anderson-Baucum EK, Winn NC, Shuey MM, Bolus WR, McGuinness OP, Hasty AH
(2019) Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 317: E200-E211
MeSH Terms: Adenoviridae, Animals, Complement C5, Disease Models, Animal, Energy Metabolism, Glucose Intolerance, Hereditary Complement Deficiency Diseases, Insulin Resistance, Mice, Mice, Inbred AKR, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Inbred CBA, Mice, Inbred DBA, Mice, Inbred NOD, Mice, Transgenic, Signal Transduction, Transduction, Genetic
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
Given the chemoattractant potential of complement factor 5 (C5) and its increased expression in adipose tissue (AT) of obese mice, we determined whether this protein of the innate immune system impacts insulin action. C5 control (C5) and spontaneously C5-deficient (C5, B10.D2--/oSnJ) mice were placed on low- and high-fat diets to investigate their inflammatory and metabolic phenotypes. Adenoviral delivery was used to evaluate the effects of exogenous C5 on systemic metabolism. C5 mice gained less weight than controls while fed a high-fat diet, accompanied by reduced AT inflammation, liver mass, and liver triglyceride content. Despite these beneficial metabolic effects, C5 mice demonstrated severe glucose intolerance and systemic insulin resistance, as well as impaired insulin signaling in liver and AT. C5 mice also exhibited decreased expression of insulin receptor (INSR) gene and protein, as well as improper processing of pro-INSR. These changes were not due to the C5 deficiency alone as other C5-deficient models did not recapitulate the INSR processing defect; rather, in addition to the mutation in the gene, whole genome sequencing revealed an intronic 31-bp deletion in the gene in the B10.D2--/oSnJ model. Irrespective of the genetic defect, adenoviral delivery of C5 improved insulin sensitivity in both C5 and C5 mice, indicating an insulin-sensitizing function of C5.
0 Communities
1 Members
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MeSH Terms
Metformin reduces liver glucose production by inhibition of fructose-1-6-bisphosphatase.
Hunter RW, Hughey CC, Lantier L, Sundelin EI, Peggie M, Zeqiraj E, Sicheri F, Jessen N, Wasserman DH, Sakamoto K
(2018) Nat Med 24: 1395-1406
MeSH Terms: Adenosine Monophosphate, Aminoimidazole Carboxamide, Animals, Base Sequence, Chickens, Disease Models, Animal, Fructose-Bisphosphatase, Glucose, Glucose Intolerance, Homeostasis, Humans, Hypoglycemia, Liver, Metformin, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mutation, Obesity, Prodrugs, Ribonucleotides
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
Metformin is a first-line drug for the treatment of individuals with type 2 diabetes, yet its precise mechanism of action remains unclear. Metformin exerts its antihyperglycemic action primarily through lowering hepatic glucose production (HGP). This suppression is thought to be mediated through inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory complex I, and thus elevation of 5'-adenosine monophosphate (AMP) levels and the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), though this proposition has been challenged given results in mice lacking hepatic AMPK. Here we report that the AMP-inhibited enzyme fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase-1 (FBP1), a rate-controlling enzyme in gluconeogenesis, functions as a major contributor to the therapeutic action of metformin. We identified a point mutation in FBP1 that renders it insensitive to AMP while sparing regulation by fructose-2,6-bisphosphate (F-2,6-P), and knock-in (KI) of this mutant in mice significantly reduces their response to metformin treatment. We observe this during a metformin tolerance test and in a metformin-euglycemic clamp that we have developed. The antihyperglycemic effect of metformin in high-fat diet-fed diabetic FBP1-KI mice was also significantly blunted compared to wild-type controls. Collectively, we show a new mechanism of action for metformin and provide further evidence that molecular targeting of FBP1 can have antihyperglycemic effects.
1 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
19 MeSH Terms
Synergistic Modulation of Inflammatory but not Metabolic Effects of High-Fat Feeding by CCR2 and CX3CR1.
Zhang H, Hinkle CC, O'Neill SM, Shi J, Caughey J, Lynch E, Lynch G, Gerelus M, Tsai ASD, Shah R, Ferguson JF, Ahima RS, Reilly MP
(2017) Obesity (Silver Spring) 25: 1410-1420
MeSH Terms: Animals, Body Composition, CX3C Chemokine Receptor 1, Diet, High-Fat, Female, Glucose Intolerance, Inflammation, Insulin, Insulin Resistance, Insulin Secretion, Macrophages, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Obesity, Receptors, CCR2, Weight Gain
Show Abstract · Added April 2, 2019
OBJECTIVE - The purpose of the study was to explore the impact of dual targeting of C-C motif chemokine receptor-2 (CCR2) and fractalkine receptor (CX3CR1) on the metabolic and inflammatory consequences of obesity induced by a high-fat diet (HFD).
METHODS - C57BL/6J wild-type, Cx3cr1 , Ccr2 , and Cx3cr1 Ccr2 double-knockout male and female mice were fed a 45% HFD for up to 25 weeks starting at 12 weeks of age.
RESULTS - All groups gained weight at a similar rate and developed a similar degree of adiposity, hyperglycemia, glucose intolerance, and impairment of insulin sensitivity in response to HFD. As expected, the circulating monocyte count was decreased in Ccr2 and Cx3cr1 Ccr2 mice but not in Cx3cr1 mice. Flow cytometric analysis of perigonadal adipose tissue of male, but not female, mice revealed trends to lower CD11c+MGL1- M1-like macrophages and higher CD11c-MGL1+ M2-like macrophages as a percentage of CD45+F4/80+CD11b+ macrophages in Cx3cr1 Ccr2 mice versus wild-type mice, suggesting reduced adipose tissue macrophage activation. In contrast, single knockout of Ccr2 or Cx3cr1 did not differ in their adipose macrophage phenotypes.
CONCLUSIONS - Although CCR2 and CX3CR1 may synergistically impact inflammatory phenotypes, their joint deficiency did not influence the metabolic effects of a 45% HFD-induced obesity in these model conditions.
© 2017 The Obesity Society.
0 Communities
1 Members
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MeSH Terms
Combined Deletion of Slc30a7 and Slc30a8 Unmasks a Critical Role for ZnT8 in Glucose-Stimulated Insulin Secretion.
Syring KE, Boortz KA, Oeser JK, Ustione A, Platt KA, Shadoan MK, McGuinness OP, Piston DW, Powell DR, O'Brien RM
(2016) Endocrinology 157: 4534-4541
MeSH Terms: Animals, Body Weight, Cation Transport Proteins, Female, Glucagon-Secreting Cells, Glucose, Glucose Intolerance, Insulin, Insulin Secretion, Insulin-Secreting Cells, Islets of Langerhans, Male, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Sex Factors, Zinc Transporter 8
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Polymorphisms in the SLC30A8 gene, which encodes the ZnT8 zinc transporter, are associated with altered susceptibility to type 2 diabetes (T2D), and SLC30A8 haploinsufficiency is protective against the development of T2D in obese humans. SLC30A8 is predominantly expressed in pancreatic islet β-cells, but surprisingly, multiple knockout mouse studies have shown little effect of Slc30a8 deletion on glucose tolerance or glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). Multiple other Slc30a isoforms are expressed at low levels in pancreatic islets. We hypothesized that functional compensation by the Slc30a7 isoform, which encodes ZnT7, limits the impact of Slc30a8 deletion on islet function. We therefore analyzed the effect of Slc30a7 deletion alone or in combination with Slc30a8 on in vivo glucose metabolism and GSIS in isolated islets. Deletion of Slc30a7 alone had complex effects in vivo, impairing glucose tolerance and reducing the glucose-stimulated increase in plasma insulin levels, hepatic glycogen levels, and pancreatic insulin content. Slc30a7 deletion also affected islet morphology and increased the ratio of islet α- to β-cells. However, deletion of Slc30a7 alone had no effect on GSIS in isolated islets, whereas combined deletion of Slc30a7 and Slc30a8 abolished GSIS. These data demonstrate that the function of ZnT8 in islets can be unmasked by removal of ZnT7 and imply that ZnT8 may affect T2D susceptibility through actions in other tissues where it is expressed at low levels rather than through effects on pancreatic islet function.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
16 MeSH Terms
Connective tissue growth factor is critical for proper β-cell function and pregnancy-induced β-cell hyperplasia in adult mice.
Pasek RC, Dunn JC, Elsakr JM, Aramandla M, Matta AR, Gannon M
(2016) Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 311: E564-74
MeSH Terms: Aging, Alleles, Animals, Cell Size, Connective Tissue Growth Factor, Diabetes, Gestational, Disease Models, Animal, Embryonic Development, Endocrine Cells, Female, Glucose, Glucose Intolerance, Glucose Tolerance Test, Insulin, Insulin-Secreting Cells, Islets of Langerhans, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Pregnancy
Show Abstract · Added August 24, 2016
During pregnancy, maternal β-cells undergo compensatory changes, including increased β-cell mass and enhanced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Failure of these adaptations to occur results in gestational diabetes mellitus. The secreted protein connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is critical for normal β-cell development and promotes regeneration after partial β-cell ablation. During embryogenesis, CTGF is expressed in pancreatic ducts, vasculature, and β-cells. In adult pancreas, CTGF is expressed only in the vasculature. Here we show that pregnant mice with global Ctgf haploinsufficiency (Ctgf(LacZ/+)) have an impairment in maternal β-cell proliferation; no difference was observed in virgin Ctgf(LacZ/+) females. Using a conditional CTGF allele, we found that mice with a specific inactivation of CTGF in endocrine cells (Ctgf(ΔEndo)) develop gestational diabetes during pregnancy, but this is due to a reduction in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion rather than impaired maternal β-cell proliferation. Moreover, virgin Ctgf(ΔEndo) females also display impaired GSIS with glucose intolerance, indicating that underlying β-cell dysfunction precedes the development of gestational diabetes in this animal model. This is the first time a role for CTGF in β-cell function has been reported.
0 Communities
2 Members
0 Resources
19 MeSH Terms
Decreased Consumption of Branched-Chain Amino Acids Improves Metabolic Health.
Fontana L, Cummings NE, Arriola Apelo SI, Neuman JC, Kasza I, Schmidt BA, Cava E, Spelta F, Tosti V, Syed FA, Baar EL, Veronese N, Cottrell SE, Fenske RJ, Bertozzi B, Brar HK, Pietka T, Bullock AD, Figenshau RS, Andriole GL, Merrins MJ, Alexander CM, Kimple ME, Lamming DW
(2016) Cell Rep 16: 520-530
MeSH Terms: Adipose Tissue, White, Amino Acids, Branched-Chain, Animals, Blood Glucose, Dietary Proteins, Fibroblast Growth Factors, Gluconeogenesis, Glucose Intolerance, Humans, Insulin-Secreting Cells, Male, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Middle Aged, Obesity, Organ Size, Stress, Physiological
Show Abstract · Added August 2, 2016
Protein-restricted (PR), high-carbohydrate diets improve metabolic health in rodents, yet the precise dietary components that are responsible for these effects have not been identified. Furthermore, the applicability of these studies to humans is unclear. Here, we demonstrate in a randomized controlled trial that a moderate PR diet also improves markers of metabolic health in humans. Intriguingly, we find that feeding mice a diet specifically reduced in branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) is sufficient to improve glucose tolerance and body composition equivalently to a PR diet via metabolically distinct pathways. Our results highlight a critical role for dietary quality at the level of amino acids in the maintenance of metabolic health and suggest that diets specifically reduced in BCAAs, or pharmacological interventions in this pathway, may offer a translatable way to achieve many of the metabolic benefits of a PR diet.
Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
16 MeSH Terms
Extranuclear Actions of the Androgen Receptor Enhance Glucose-Stimulated Insulin Secretion in the Male.
Navarro G, Xu W, Jacobson DA, Wicksteed B, Allard C, Zhang G, De Gendt K, Kim SH, Wu H, Zhang H, Verhoeven G, Katzenellenbogen JA, Mauvais-Jarvis F
(2016) Cell Metab 23: 837-51
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Line, Tumor, Cell Nucleus, Cyclic AMP, Glucose, Glucose Intolerance, Humans, Insulin, Insulin-Secreting Cells, Male, Mice, Knockout, Models, Biological, Receptors, Androgen, Signal Transduction, Testosterone
Show Abstract · Added November 13, 2017
Although men with testosterone deficiency are at increased risk for type 2 diabetes (T2D), previous studies have ignored the role of testosterone and the androgen receptor (AR) in pancreatic β cells. We show that male mice lacking AR in β cells (βARKO) exhibit decreased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS), leading to glucose intolerance. The AR agonist dihydrotestosterone (DHT) enhances GSIS in cultured male islets, an effect that is abolished in βARKO(-/y) islets and human islets treated with an AR antagonist. In β cells, DHT-activated AR is predominantly extranuclear and enhances GSIS by increasing islet cAMP and activating the protein kinase A. In mouse and human islets, the insulinotropic effect of DHT depends on activation of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor, and accordingly, DHT amplifies the incretin effect of GLP-1. This study identifies AR as a novel receptor that enhances β cell function, a finding with implications for the prevention of T2D in aging men.
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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1 Members
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15 MeSH Terms
Alternative rapamycin treatment regimens mitigate the impact of rapamycin on glucose homeostasis and the immune system.
Arriola Apelo SI, Neuman JC, Baar EL, Syed FA, Cummings NE, Brar HK, Pumper CP, Kimple ME, Lamming DW
(2016) Aging Cell 15: 28-38
MeSH Terms: Animals, Blood Glucose, Cell Proliferation, Glucose Intolerance, Homeostasis, Immune System, Insulin-Secreting Cells, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Signal Transduction, Sirolimus
Show Abstract · Added August 2, 2016
Inhibition of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway by the FDA-approved drug rapamycin has been shown to promote lifespan and delay age-related diseases in model organisms including mice. Unfortunately, rapamycin has potentially serious side effects in humans, including glucose intolerance and immunosuppression, which may preclude the long-term prophylactic use of rapamycin as a therapy for age-related diseases. While the beneficial effects of rapamycin are largely mediated by the inhibition of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1), which is acutely sensitive to rapamycin, many of the negative side effects are mediated by the inhibition of a second mTOR-containing complex, mTORC2, which is much less sensitive to rapamycin. We hypothesized that different rapamycin dosing schedules or the use of FDA-approved rapamycin analogs with different pharmacokinetics might expand the therapeutic window of rapamycin by more specifically targeting mTORC1. Here, we identified an intermittent rapamycin dosing schedule with minimal effects on glucose tolerance, and we find that this schedule has a reduced impact on pyruvate tolerance, fasting glucose and insulin levels, beta cell function, and the immune system compared to daily rapamycin treatment. Further, we find that the FDA-approved rapamycin analogs everolimus and temsirolimus efficiently inhibit mTORC1 while having a reduced impact on glucose and pyruvate tolerance. Our results suggest that many of the negative side effects of rapamycin treatment can be mitigated through intermittent dosing or the use of rapamycin analogs.
© 2015 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
10 MeSH Terms
SIRT3 Is Crucial for Maintaining Skeletal Muscle Insulin Action and Protects Against Severe Insulin Resistance in High-Fat-Fed Mice.
Lantier L, Williams AS, Williams IM, Yang KK, Bracy DP, Goelzer M, James FD, Gius D, Wasserman DH
(2015) Diabetes 64: 3081-92
MeSH Terms: Acetylation, Animals, Diet, High-Fat, Glucose Clamp Technique, Glucose Intolerance, Hexokinase, Insulin, Insulin Resistance, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Mitochondria, Muscle Fibers, Skeletal, Muscle, Skeletal, Sirtuin 3
Show Abstract · Added September 28, 2015
Protein hyperacetylation is associated with glucose intolerance and insulin resistance, suggesting that the enzymes regulating the acetylome play a role in this pathological process. Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3), the primary mitochondrial deacetylase, has been linked to energy homeostasis. Thus, it is hypothesized that the dysregulation of the mitochondrial acetylation state, via genetic deletion of SIRT3, will amplify the deleterious effects of a high-fat diet (HFD). Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp experiments show, for the first time, that mice lacking SIRT3 exhibit increased insulin resistance due to defects in skeletal muscle glucose uptake. Permeabilized muscle fibers from HFD-fed SIRT3 knockout (KO) mice showed that tricarboxylic acid cycle substrate-based respiration is decreased while fatty acid-based respiration is increased, reflecting a fuel switch from glucose to fatty acids. Consistent with reduced muscle glucose uptake, hexokinase II (HKII) binding to the mitochondria is decreased in muscle from HFD-fed SIRT3 KO mice, suggesting decreased HKII activity. These results show that the absence of SIRT3 in HFD-fed mice causes profound impairments in insulin-stimulated muscle glucose uptake, creating an increased reliance on fatty acids. Insulin action was not impaired in the lean SIRT3 KO mice. This suggests that SIRT3 protects against dietary insulin resistance by facilitating glucose disposal and mitochondrial function.
© 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.
0 Communities
2 Members
0 Resources
14 MeSH Terms