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Acute effects of insulin on circulating natriuretic peptide levels in humans.
Bachmann KN, Deger SM, Alsouqi A, Huang S, Xu M, Ferguson JF, Su YR, Niswender KD, Ikizler TA, Wang TJ
(2018) PLoS One 13: e0196869
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Atrial Natriuretic Factor, Female, Glucose Clamp Technique, Humans, Insulin, Insulin Resistance, Male, Middle Aged, Natriuretic Peptide, Brain, Obesity, Peptide Fragments
Show Abstract · Added April 2, 2019
BACKGROUND - The natriuretic peptide hormones play an important role in salt and blood pressure regulation. In observational studies, obesity and insulin resistance have been consistently associated with lower concentrations of natriuretic peptides. It has been proposed that insulin influences natriuretic peptide production.
OBJECTIVE - We sought to determine the acute effects of insulin administration on natriuretic peptide concentrations.
METHODS - 31 men and women (11 lean, 10 overweight, and 10 obese), ages 30-70 years, without cardiovascular disease or overt diabetes underwent a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic insulin clamp. Plasma concentrations of N-terminal pro atrial natriuretic peptide (NT-proANP) and N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) were measured at baseline and steady-state (the final 30 minutes of the clamp protocol).
RESULTS - From baseline to steady-state, insulin levels increased from a mean level of 9.5 to 176.7 μU/ml (p<0.001). Over this period, circulating NT-proANP concentrations decreased by 9% (-1933 ng/L, p = 0.01). The changes in NT-proANP did not differ between lean, overweight, and obese individuals. Steady-state NT-proANP levels, adjusted for baseline, were lower in individuals with greater insulin resistance, independent of BMI. In contrast to NT-proANP, NT-proBNP levels did not change significantly during the clamp (p = 0.41).
CONCLUSION - Insulin administration was associated with a moderate decrease in circulating NT-proANP, but not NT-proBNP. The lowest NT-proANP concentrations were found in insulin-resistant individuals. Further investigations are warranted to elucidate potential mechanisms underlying the effects of insulin on the cardiac hormonal axis.
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MeSH Terms
Insulin exits skeletal muscle capillaries by fluid-phase transport.
Williams IM, Valenzuela FA, Kahl SD, Ramkrishna D, Mezo AR, Young JD, Wells KS, Wasserman DH
(2018) J Clin Invest 128: 699-714
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antigens, CD, Biological Transport, Capillaries, Diabetes Mellitus, Glucose, Glucose Clamp Technique, Humans, Hyperinsulinism, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, Insulin, Intravital Microscopy, Kinetics, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Models, Theoretical, Muscle, Skeletal, Protein Binding, Receptor, Insulin, Rhodamines
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Before insulin can stimulate myocytes to take up glucose, it must first move from the circulation to the interstitial space. The continuous endothelium of skeletal muscle (SkM) capillaries restricts insulin's access to myocytes. The mechanism by which insulin crosses this continuous endothelium is critical to understand insulin action and insulin resistance; however, methodological obstacles have limited understanding of endothelial insulin transport in vivo. Here, we present an intravital microscopy technique to measure the rate of insulin efflux across the endothelium of SkM capillaries. This method involves development of a fully bioactive, fluorescent insulin probe, a gastrocnemius preparation for intravital microscopy, an automated vascular segmentation algorithm, and the use of mathematical models to estimate endothelial transport parameters. We combined direct visualization of insulin efflux from SkM capillaries with modeling of insulin efflux kinetics to identify fluid-phase transport as the major mode of transendothelial insulin efflux in mice. Model-independent experiments demonstrating that insulin movement is neither saturable nor affected by insulin receptor antagonism supported this result. Our finding that insulin enters the SkM interstitium by fluid-phase transport may have implications in the pathophysiology of SkM insulin resistance as well as in the treatment of diabetes with various insulin analogs.
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21 MeSH Terms
Glucose autoregulation is the dominant component of the hormone-independent counterregulatory response to hypoglycemia in the conscious dog.
Gregory JM, Rivera N, Kraft G, Winnick JJ, Farmer B, Allen EJ, Donahue EP, Smith MS, Edgerton DS, Williams PE, Cherrington AD
(2017) Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 313: E273-E283
MeSH Terms: Adipose Tissue, Adrenalectomy, Animals, Blood Glucose, Dogs, Gluconeogenesis, Glucose, Glucose Clamp Technique, Homeostasis, Hypoglycemia, Hypoglycemic Agents, Infusions, Intravenous, Insulin, Liver, Liver Glycogen, Muscle, Skeletal, Norepinephrine, Portal Vein, Sympathetic Nervous System
Show Abstract · Added April 23, 2018
The contribution of hormone-independent counterregulatory signals in defense of insulin-induced hypoglycemia was determined in adrenalectomized, overnight-fasted conscious dogs receiving hepatic portal vein insulin infusions at a rate 20-fold basal. Either euglycemia was maintained () or hypoglycemia (≈45 mg/dl) was allowed to occur. There were three hypoglycemic groups: one in which hepatic autoregulation against hypoglycemia occurred in the absence of sympathetic nervous system input (), one in which autoregulation occurred in the presence of norepinephrine (NE) signaling to fat and muscle (), and one in which autoregulation occurred in the presence of NE signaling to fat, muscle, and liver (). Average net hepatic glucose balance (NHGB) during the last hour for was -0.7 ± 0.1, 0.3 ± 0.1 ( < 0.01 vs. ), 0.7 ± 0.1 ( = 0.01 vs. ), and 0.8 ± 0.1 ( = 0.7 vs. ) mg·kg·min, respectively. Hypoglycemia per se () increased NHGB by causing an inhibition of net hepatic glycogen synthesis. NE signaling to fat and muscle () increased NHGB further by mobilizing gluconeogenic precursors resulting in a rise in gluconeogenesis. Lowering glucose per se decreased nonhepatic glucose uptake by 8.9 mg·kg·min, and the addition of increased neural efferent signaling to muscle and fat blocked glucose uptake further by 3.2 mg·kg·min The addition of increased neural efferent input to liver did not affect NHGB or nonhepatic glucose uptake significantly. In conclusion, even in the absence of increases in counterregulatory hormones, the body can defend itself against hypoglycemia using glucose autoregulation and increased neural efferent signaling, both of which stimulate hepatic glucose production and limit glucose utilization.
Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.
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Metabolic responses to exogenous ghrelin in obesity and early after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass in humans.
Tamboli RA, Antoun J, Sidani RM, Clements A, Harmata EE, Marks-Shulman P, Gaylinn BD, Williams B, Clements RH, Albaugh VL, Abumrad NN
(2017) Diabetes Obes Metab 19: 1267-1275
MeSH Terms: Acylation, Anti-Obesity Agents, Cohort Studies, Combined Modality Therapy, Cross-Over Studies, Energy Metabolism, Gastric Bypass, Ghrelin, Gluconeogenesis, Glucose Clamp Technique, Human Growth Hormone, Humans, Infusions, Intravenous, Insulin Resistance, Liver, Muscle, Skeletal, Obesity, Morbid, Pancreatic Polypeptide, Pancreatic Polypeptide-Secreting Cells, Pituitary Gland, Anterior, Postoperative Care, Preoperative Care, Protein Precursors, Single-Blind Method
Show Abstract · Added April 3, 2017
AIMS - Ghrelin is a gastric-derived hormone that stimulates growth hormone (GH) secretion and has a multi-faceted role in the regulation of energy homeostasis, including glucose metabolism. Circulating ghrelin concentrations are modulated in response to nutritional status, but responses to ghrelin in altered metabolic states are poorly understood. We investigated the metabolic effects of ghrelin in obesity and early after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB).
MATERIALS AND METHODS - We assessed central and peripheral metabolic responses to acyl ghrelin infusion (1 pmol kg  min ) in healthy, lean subjects (n = 9) and non-diabetic, obese subjects (n = 9) before and 2 weeks after RYGB. Central responses were assessed by GH and pancreatic polypeptide (surrogate for vagal activity) secretion. Peripheral responses were assessed by hepatic and skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity during a hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp.
RESULTS - Ghrelin-stimulated GH secretion was attenuated in obese subjects, but was restored by RYGB to a response similar to that of lean subjects. The heightened pancreatic polypeptide response to ghrelin infusion in the obese was attenuated after RYGB. Hepatic glucose production and hepatic insulin sensitivity were not altered by ghrelin infusion in RYGB subjects. Skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity was impaired to a similar degree in lean, obese and post-RYGB individuals in response to ghrelin infusion.
CONCLUSIONS - These data suggest that obesity is characterized by abnormal central, but not peripheral, responsiveness to ghrelin that can be restored early after RYGB before significant weight loss. Further work is necessary to fully elucidate the role of ghrelin in the metabolic changes that occur in obesity and following RYGB.
© 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
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24 MeSH Terms
Integrin-Linked Kinase Is Necessary for the Development of Diet-Induced Hepatic Insulin Resistance.
Williams AS, Trefts E, Lantier L, Grueter CA, Bracy DP, James FD, Pozzi A, Zent R, Wasserman DH
(2017) Diabetes 66: 325-334
MeSH Terms: Animals, Diet, High-Fat, Extracellular Matrix, Gene Deletion, Glucose Clamp Technique, Insulin Resistance, Liver, Mice, Mice, Transgenic, Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases, Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction, Triglycerides
Show Abstract · Added April 26, 2017
The liver extracellular matrix (ECM) expands with high-fat (HF) feeding. This finding led us to address whether receptors for the ECM, integrins, are key to the development of diet-induced hepatic insulin resistance. Integrin-linked kinase (ILK) is a downstream integrin signaling molecule involved in multiple hepatic processes, including those related to differentiation, wound healing, and metabolism. We tested the hypothesis that deletion of ILK in mice on an HF diet would disrupt the ECM-integrin signaling axis, thereby preventing the transformation into the insulin-resistant liver. To determine the role of ILK in hepatic insulin action in vivo, male C57BL/6J ILK mice were crossed with Albcre mice to produce a hepatocyte-specific ILK deletion (ILKAlbcre). Results from this study show that hepatic ILK deletion has no effect on insulin action in lean mice but sensitizes the liver to insulin during the challenge of HF feeding. This effect corresponds to changes in the expression and activation of key insulin signaling pathways as well as a greater capacity for hepatic mitochondrial glucose oxidation. This demonstrates that ILK contributes to hepatic insulin resistance and highlights the previously undefined role of integrin signaling in the pathogenesis of diet-induced hepatic insulin resistance.
© 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.
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12 MeSH Terms
IRF3 promotes adipose inflammation and insulin resistance and represses browning.
Kumari M, Wang X, Lantier L, Lyubetskaya A, Eguchi J, Kang S, Tenen D, Roh HC, Kong X, Kazak L, Ahmad R, Rosen ED
(2016) J Clin Invest 126: 2839-54
MeSH Terms: 3T3-L1 Cells, Adipocytes, Adipose Tissue, Adiposity, Adult, Animals, Blood Glucose, Diet, Female, Gene Expression Regulation, Glucose Clamp Technique, Glucose Transporter Type 4, HEK293 Cells, Homeostasis, Humans, Inflammation, Insulin Resistance, Interferon Regulatory Factor-3, Male, Mice, Mice, Transgenic, Middle Aged, NF-kappa B, Obesity, Toll-Like Receptor 3, Toll-Like Receptor 4
Show Abstract · Added May 16, 2019
The chronic inflammatory state that accompanies obesity is a major contributor to insulin resistance and other dysfunctional adaptations in adipose tissue. Cellular and secreted factors promote the inflammatory milieu of obesity, but the transcriptional pathways that drive these processes are not well described. Although the canonical inflammatory transcription factor NF-κB is considered to be the major driver of adipocyte inflammation, members of the interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family may also play a role in this process. Here, we determined that IRF3 expression is upregulated in the adipocytes of obese mice and humans. Signaling through TLR3 and TLR4, which lie upstream of IRF3, induced insulin resistance in murine adipocytes, while IRF3 knockdown prevented insulin resistance. Furthermore, improved insulin sensitivity in IRF3-deficient mice was associated with reductions in intra-adipose and systemic inflammation in the high fat-fed state, enhanced browning of subcutaneous fat, and increased adipose expression of GLUT4. Taken together, the data indicate that IRF3 is a major transcriptional regulator of adipose inflammation and is involved in maintaining systemic glucose and energy homeostasis.
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Jejunal administration of glucose enhances acyl ghrelin suppression in obese humans.
Tamboli RA, Sidani RM, Garcia AE, Antoun J, Isbell JM, Albaugh VL, Abumrad NN
(2016) Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 311: E252-9
MeSH Terms: Adult, Blood Glucose, Female, Gastric Bypass, Gastric Inhibitory Polypeptide, Ghrelin, Glucagon-Like Peptide 1, Glucose, Glucose Clamp Technique, Humans, Infusions, Intravenous, Insulin, Jejunum, Male, Obesity
Show Abstract · Added July 5, 2016
Ghrelin is a gastric hormone that stimulates hunger and worsens glucose metabolism. Circulating ghrelin is decreased after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery; however, the mechanism(s) underlying this change is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that jejunal nutrient exposure plays a significant role in ghrelin suppression after RYGB. Feeding tubes were placed in the stomach or jejunum in 13 obese subjects to simulate pre-RYGB or post-RYGB glucose exposure to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, respectively, without the confounding effects of caloric restriction, weight loss, and surgical stress. On separate study days, the plasma glucose curves obtained with either gastric or jejunal administration of glucose were replicated with intravenous (iv) infusions of glucose. These "isoglycemic clamps" enabled us to determine the contribution of the GI tract and postabsorptive plasma glucose to acyl ghrelin suppression. Plasma acyl ghrelin levels were suppressed to a greater degree with jejunal glucose administration compared with gastric glucose administration (P < 0.05). Jejunal administration of glucose also resulted in a greater suppression of acyl ghrelin than the corresponding isoglycemic glucose infusion (P ≤ 0.01). However, gastric and isoglycemic iv glucose infusions resulted in similar degrees of acyl ghrelin suppression (P > 0.05). Direct exposure of the proximal jejunum to glucose increases acyl ghrelin suppression independent of circulating glucose levels. The enhanced suppression of acyl ghrelin after RYGB may be due to a nutrient-initiated signal in the jejunum that regulates ghrelin secretion.
Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.
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15 MeSH Terms
Integrin-Linked Kinase in Muscle Is Necessary for the Development of Insulin Resistance in Diet-Induced Obese Mice.
Kang L, Mokshagundam S, Reuter B, Lark DS, Sneddon CC, Hennayake C, Williams AS, Bracy DP, James FD, Pozzi A, Zent R, Wasserman DH
(2016) Diabetes 65: 1590-600
MeSH Terms: Animals, Diet, High-Fat, Extracellular Matrix, Glucose, Glucose Clamp Technique, Insulin, Insulin Resistance, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Obese, Muscle, Skeletal, Obesity, Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added October 17, 2016
Diet-induced muscle insulin resistance is associated with expansion of extracellular matrix (ECM) components, such as collagens, and the expression of collagen-binding integrin, α2β1. Integrins transduce signals from ECM via their cytoplasmic domains, which bind to intracellular integrin-binding proteins. The integrin-linked kinase (ILK)-PINCH-parvin (IPP) complex interacts with the cytoplasmic domain of β-integrin subunits and is critical for integrin signaling. In this study we defined the role of ILK, a key component of the IPP complex, in diet-induced muscle insulin resistance. Wild-type (ILK(lox/lox)) and muscle-specific ILK-deficient (ILK(lox/lox)HSAcre) mice were fed chow or a high-fat (HF) diet for 16 weeks. Body weight was not different between ILK(lox/lox) and ILK(lox/lox)HSAcre mice. However, HF-fed ILK(lox/lox)HSAcre mice had improved muscle insulin sensitivity relative to HF-fed ILK(lox/lox) mice, as shown by increased rates of glucose infusion, glucose disappearance, and muscle glucose uptake during a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. Improved muscle insulin action in the HF-fed ILK(lox/lox)HSAcre mice was associated with increased insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt and increased muscle capillarization. These results suggest that ILK expression in muscle is a critical component of diet-induced insulin resistance, which possibly acts by impairing insulin signaling and insulin perfusion through capillaries.
© 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.
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14 MeSH Terms
Hepatic glycogen can regulate hypoglycemic counterregulation via a liver-brain axis.
Winnick JJ, Kraft G, Gregory JM, Edgerton DS, Williams P, Hajizadeh IA, Kamal MZ, Smith M, Farmer B, Scott M, Neal D, Donahue EP, Allen E, Cherrington AD
(2016) J Clin Invest 126: 2236-48
MeSH Terms: Animals, Blood Glucose, Brain, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1, Disease Models, Animal, Dogs, Female, Fructose, Glucose, Glucose Clamp Technique, Humans, Hypoglycemia, Insulin, Lactic Acid, Lipid Metabolism, Liver, Liver Glycogen, Male, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added May 29, 2016
Liver glycogen is important for the counterregulation of hypoglycemia and is reduced in individuals with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Here, we examined the effect of varying hepatic glycogen content on the counterregulatory response to low blood sugar in dogs. During the first 4 hours of each study, hepatic glycogen was increased by augmenting hepatic glucose uptake using hyperglycemia and a low-dose intraportal fructose infusion. After hepatic glycogen levels were increased, animals underwent a 2-hour control period with no fructose infusion followed by a 2-hour hyperinsulinemic/hypoglycemic clamp. Compared with control treatment, fructose infusion caused a large increase in liver glycogen that markedly elevated the response of epinephrine and glucagon to a given hypoglycemia and increased net hepatic glucose output (NHGO). Moreover, prior denervation of the liver abolished the improved counterregulatory responses that resulted from increased liver glycogen content. When hepatic glycogen content was lowered, glucagon and NHGO responses to insulin-induced hypoglycemia were reduced. We conclude that there is a liver-brain counterregulatory axis that is responsive to liver glycogen content. It remains to be determined whether the risk of iatrogenic hypoglycemia in T1D humans could be lessened by targeting metabolic pathway(s) associated with hepatic glycogen repletion.
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19 MeSH Terms
Chronic Angiotensin-(1-7) Improves Insulin Sensitivity in High-Fat Fed Mice Independent of Blood Pressure.
Williams IM, Otero YF, Bracy DP, Wasserman DH, Biaggioni I, Arnold AC
(2016) Hypertension 67: 983-91
MeSH Terms: Analysis of Variance, Angiotensin I, Animals, Blood Glucose, Blood Pressure Determination, Body Composition, Cardiovascular Diseases, Diet, High-Fat, Disease Models, Animal, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Drug Administration Schedule, Glucose Clamp Technique, Heart Function Tests, Hemodynamics, Hypertension, Infusions, Subcutaneous, Insulin Resistance, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Obesity, Peptide Fragments, Random Allocation, Reference Values, Renin-Angiotensin System
Show Abstract · Added May 5, 2016
Angiotensin-(1-7) improves glycemic control in animal models of cardiometabolic syndrome. The tissue-specific sites of action and blood pressure dependence of these metabolic effects, however, remain unclear. We hypothesized that Ang-(1-7) improves insulin sensitivity by enhancing peripheral glucose delivery. Adult male C57BL/6J mice were placed on standard chow or 60% high-fat diet for 11 weeks. Ang-(1-7) (400 ng/kg per minute) or saline was infused subcutaneously during the last 3 weeks of diet, and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps were performed at the end of treatment. High-fat fed mice exhibited modest hypertension (systolic blood pressure: 137 ± 3 high fat versus 123 ± 5 mm Hg chow;P=0.001), which was not altered by Ang-(1-7) (141 ± 4 mm Hg;P=0.574). Ang-(1-7) did not alter body weight or fasting glucose and insulin in chow or high-fat fed mice. Ang-(1-7) increased the steady-state glucose infusion rate needed to maintain euglycemia in high-fat fed mice (31 ± 5 Ang-(1-7) versus 16 ± 1 mg/kg per minute vehicle;P=0.017) reflecting increased whole-body insulin sensitivity, with no effect in chow-fed mice. The improved insulin sensitivity in high-fat fed mice was because of an enhanced rate of glucose disappearance (34 ± 5 Ang-(1-7) versus 20 ± 2 mg/kg per minute vehicle;P=0.049). Ang-(1-7) enhanced glucose uptake specifically into skeletal muscle by increasing translocation of glucose transporter 4 to the sarcolemma. Our data suggest that Ang-(1-7) has direct insulin-sensitizing effects on skeletal muscle, independent of changes in blood pressure. These findings provide new insight into mechanisms by which Ang-(1-7) improves insulin action, and provide further support for targeting this peptide in cardiometabolic disease.
© 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.
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25 MeSH Terms