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Lipid Droplet Accumulation in Human Pancreatic Islets Is Dependent On Both Donor Age and Health.
Tong X, Dai C, Walker JT, Nair GG, Kennedy A, Carr RM, Hebrok M, Powers AC, Stein R
(2020) Diabetes 69: 342-354
MeSH Terms: Acinar Cells, Adolescent, Adult, Age Factors, Aged, Animals, Child, Child, Preschool, Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Embryonic Stem Cells, Female, Glucagon-Secreting Cells, Humans, Infant, Insulin-Secreting Cells, Islets of Langerhans, Islets of Langerhans Transplantation, Lipid Droplets, Male, Mice, Microscopy, Electron, Microscopy, Fluorescence, Middle Aged, Rats, Tissue Donors, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added March 29, 2020
Human but not mouse islets transplanted into immunodeficient NSG mice effectively accumulate lipid droplets (LDs). Because chronic lipid exposure is associated with islet β-cell dysfunction, we investigated LD accumulation in the intact human and mouse pancreas over a range of ages and states of diabetes. Very few LDs were found in normal human juvenile pancreatic acinar and islet cells, with numbers subsequently increasing throughout adulthood. While accumulation appeared evenly distributed in postjuvenile acinar and islet cells in donors without diabetes, LDs were enriched in islet α- and β-cells from donors with type 2 diabetes (T2D). LDs were also found in the islet β-like cells produced from human embryonic cell-derived β-cell clusters. In contrast, LD accumulation was nearly undetectable in the adult rodent pancreas, even in hyperglycemic and hyperlipidemic models or 1.5-year-old mice. Taken together, there appear to be significant differences in pancreas islet cell lipid handling between species, and the human juvenile and adult cell populations. Moreover, our results suggest that LD enrichment could be impactful to T2D islet cell function.
© 2019 by the American Diabetes Association.
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27 MeSH Terms
Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery improves hepatic glucose metabolism and reduces plasma kisspeptin levels in morbidly obese patients with type 2 diabetes.
Flynn CR, Albaugh VL, Tamboli RA, Gregory JM, Bosompem A, Sidani RM, Winnick JJ
(2020) Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol 318: G370-G374
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Anastomosis, Roux-en-Y, Blood Glucose, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Female, Glucagon, Glucose, Humans, Insulin, Kisspeptins, Liver, Male, Middle Aged, Obesity, Morbid, Treatment Outcome, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added November 12, 2019
Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB) is known to improve whole-body glucose metabolism in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D), although the mechanisms are not entirely clear and are likely multifactorial. The aim of this study was to assess fasting hepatic glucose metabolism and other markers of metabolic activity before and after RYGB in patients with and without T2D. Methods: Metabolic characteristics of patients who are obese with T2D were compared with those without the disease (non-T2D) before and 1 and 6 mo after RYGB. Fasting plasma insulin and the insulin:glucagon ratio were markedly reduced as early as 1 mo after RYGB in both patients with T2D and without T2D. Despite this reduction, endogenous glucose production and fasting plasma glucose levels were lower in both groups after RYGB, with the reductions being much larger in T2D. Plasma kisspeptin, an inhibitor of insulin secretion, was reduced only in T2D after surgery. Improved hepatic glucose metabolism and lower plasma kisspeptin in T2D after RYGB may link improved hepatic function with enhanced insulin responsiveness after surgery. Our manuscript is the first, to the best of our knowledge, to present data showing that Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB) lowers fasting kisspeptin levels in patients who are obese with type 2 diabetes. This lowering of kisspeptin is important because it could link improvements in liver glucose metabolism after RYGB with increased insulin responsiveness also seen after surgery.
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17 MeSH Terms
GLP-1: Molecular mechanisms and outcomes of a complex signaling system.
Smith NK, Hackett TA, Galli A, Flynn CR
(2019) Neurochem Int 128: 94-105
MeSH Terms: Animals, Brain, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Feeding Behavior, Glucagon-Like Peptide 1, Humans, Obesity, Reward, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added December 17, 2019
Meal ingestion provokes the release of hormones and transmitters, which in turn regulate energy homeostasis and feeding behavior. One such hormone, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), has received significant attention in the treatment of obesity and diabetes due to its potent incretin effect. In addition to the peripheral actions of GLP-1, this hormone is able to alter behavior through the modulation of multiple neural circuits. Recent work that focused on elucidating the mechanisms and outcomes of GLP-1 neuromodulation led to the discovery of an impressive array of GLP-1 actions. Here, we summarize the many levels at which the GLP-1 signal adapts to different systems, with the goal being to provide a background against which to guide future research.
Copyright © 2019. Published by Elsevier Ltd.
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9 MeSH Terms
Glucose-mediated inhibition of calcium-activated potassium channels limits α-cell calcium influx and glucagon secretion.
Dickerson MT, Dadi PK, Altman MK, Verlage KR, Thorson AS, Jordan KL, Vierra NC, Amarnath G, Jacobson DA
(2019) Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 316: E646-E659
MeSH Terms: Alkanes, Animals, Apamin, Calcium, Calcium Channels, Calcium Channels, L-Type, Calcium Channels, P-Type, Calcium Channels, Q-Type, Endoplasmic Reticulum, Glucagon, Glucagon-Secreting Cells, Glucose, Mice, Mice, Transgenic, Patch-Clamp Techniques, Peptides, Potassium Channel Blockers, Potassium Channels, Calcium-Activated, Pyrazoles, Quinolinium Compounds
Show Abstract · Added February 13, 2019
Pancreatic α-cells exhibit oscillations in cytosolic Ca (Ca), which control pulsatile glucagon (GCG) secretion. However, the mechanisms that modulate α-cell Ca oscillations have not been elucidated. As β-cell Ca oscillations are regulated in part by Ca-activated K (K) currents, this work investigated the role of K in α-cell Ca handling and GCG secretion. α-Cells displayed K currents that were dependent on Ca influx through L- and P/Q-type voltage-dependent Ca channels (VDCCs) as well as Ca released from endoplasmic reticulum stores. α-Cell K was decreased by small-conductance Ca-activated K (SK) channel inhibitors apamin and UCL 1684, large-conductance Ca-activated K (BK) channel inhibitor iberiotoxin (IbTx), and intermediate-conductance Ca-activated K (IK) channel inhibitor TRAM 34. Moreover, partial inhibition of α-cell K with apamin depolarized membrane potential ( V) (3.8 ± 0.7 mV) and reduced action potential (AP) amplitude (10.4 ± 1.9 mV). Although apamin transiently increased Ca influx into α-cells at low glucose (42.9 ± 10.6%), sustained SK (38.5 ± 10.4%) or BK channel inhibition (31.0 ± 11.7%) decreased α-cell Ca influx. Total α-cell Ca was similarly reduced (28.3 ± 11.1%) following prolonged treatment with high glucose, but it was not decreased further by SK or BK channel inhibition. Consistent with reduced α-cell Ca following prolonged K inhibition, apamin decreased GCG secretion from mouse (20.4 ± 4.2%) and human (27.7 ± 13.1%) islets at low glucose. These data demonstrate that K activation provides a hyperpolarizing influence on α-cell V that sustains Ca entry during hypoglycemic conditions, presumably by preventing voltage-dependent inactivation of P/Q-type VDCCs. Thus, when α-cell Ca is elevated during secretagogue stimulation, K activation helps to preserve GCG secretion.
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20 MeSH Terms
Role of Bile Acids and GLP-1 in Mediating the Metabolic Improvements of Bariatric Surgery.
Albaugh VL, Banan B, Antoun J, Xiong Y, Guo Y, Ping J, Alikhan M, Clements BA, Abumrad NN, Flynn CR
(2019) Gastroenterology 156: 1041-1051.e4
MeSH Terms: Anastomosis, Surgical, Animals, Anticholesteremic Agents, Bariatric Surgery, Bile Acids and Salts, Blood Glucose, Cholestyramine Resin, Diet, High-Fat, Gallbladder, Glucagon-Like Peptide 1, Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor, Glucose Tolerance Test, Ileum, Insulin Resistance, Intestines, Lymph, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Receptors, Cytoplasmic and Nuclear, Receptors, G-Protein-Coupled, Signal Transduction, Verrucomicrobia, Weight Loss
Show Abstract · Added January 4, 2019
BACKGROUND & AIMS - Bile diversion to the ileum (GB-IL) has strikingly similar metabolic and satiating effects to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) in rodent obesity models. The metabolic benefits of these procedures are thought to be mediated by increased bile acids, although parallel changes in body weight and other confounding variables limit this interpretation.
METHODS - Global G protein-coupled bile acid receptor-1 null (Tgr5) and intestinal-specific farnesoid X receptor null (Fxr) mice on high-fat diet as well as wild-type C57BL/6 and glucagon-like polypeptide 1 receptor deficient (Glp-1r) mice on chow diet were characterized following GB-IL.
RESULTS - GB-IL induced weight loss and improved oral glucose tolerance in Tgr5, but not Fxr mice fed a high-fat diet, suggesting a role for intestinal Fxr. GB-IL in wild-type, chow-fed mice prompted weight-independent improvements in glycemia and glucose tolerance secondary to augmented insulin responsiveness. Improvements were concomitant with increased levels of lymphatic GLP-1 in the fasted state and increased levels of intestinal Akkermansia muciniphila. Improvements in fasting glycemia after GB-IL were mitigated with exendin-9, a GLP-1 receptor antagonist, or cholestyramine, a bile acid sequestrant. The glucoregulatory effects of GB-IL were lost in whole-body Glp-1r mice.
CONCLUSIONS - Bile diversion to the ileum improves glucose homeostasis via an intestinal Fxr-Glp-1 axis. Altered intestinal bile acid availability, independent of weight loss, and intestinal Akkermansia muciniphila appear to mediate the metabolic changes observed after bariatric surgery and might be manipulated for treatment of obesity and diabetes.
Copyright © 2019 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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25 MeSH Terms
Pancreatic islet-autonomous insulin and smoothened-mediated signalling modulate identity changes of glucagon α-cells.
Cigliola V, Ghila L, Thorel F, van Gurp L, Baronnier D, Oropeza D, Gupta S, Miyatsuka T, Kaneto H, Magnuson MA, Osipovich AB, Sander M, Wright CEV, Thomas MK, Furuyama K, Chera S, Herrera PL
(2018) Nat Cell Biol 20: 1267-1277
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Differentiation, Cell Plasticity, Cell Proliferation, Female, Glucagon-Secreting Cells, Insulin, Insulin-Secreting Cells, Islets of Langerhans, Male, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Mice, SCID, Mice, Transgenic, Signal Transduction, Smoothened Receptor
Show Abstract · Added November 6, 2018
The mechanisms that restrict regeneration and maintain cell identity following injury are poorly characterized in higher vertebrates. Following β-cell loss, 1-2% of the glucagon-producing α-cells spontaneously engage in insulin production in mice. Here we explore the mechanisms inhibiting α-cell plasticity. We show that adaptive α-cell identity changes are constrained by intra-islet insulin- and Smoothened-mediated signalling, among others. The combination of β-cell loss or insulin-signalling inhibition, with Smoothened inactivation in α- or δ-cells, stimulates insulin production in more α-cells. These findings suggest that the removal of constitutive 'brake signals' is crucial to neutralize the refractoriness to adaptive cell-fate changes. It appears that the maintenance of cell identity is an active process mediated by repressive signals, which are released by neighbouring cells and curb an intrinsic trend of differentiated cells to change.
2 Communities
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16 MeSH Terms
Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes is caused by islet loss and inflammation.
Hart NJ, Aramandla R, Poffenberger G, Fayolle C, Thames AH, Bautista A, Spigelman AF, Babon JAB, DeNicola ME, Dadi PK, Bush WS, Balamurugan AN, Brissova M, Dai C, Prasad N, Bottino R, Jacobson DA, Drumm ML, Kent SC, MacDonald PE, Powers AC
(2018) JCI Insight 3:
MeSH Terms: Adult, Animals, Cystic Fibrosis, Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator, Diabetes Complications, Diabetes Mellitus, Female, Gene Deletion, Glucagon, Humans, Inflammation, Insulin, Insulin-Secreting Cells, Islets of Langerhans, Male, Mice, Mutation
Show Abstract · Added April 23, 2018
Cystic fibrosis-related (CF-related) diabetes (CFRD) is an increasingly common and devastating comorbidity of CF, affecting approximately 35% of adults with CF. However, the underlying causes of CFRD are unclear. Here, we examined cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) islet expression and whether the CFTR participates in islet endocrine cell function using murine models of β cell CFTR deletion and normal and CF human pancreas and islets. Specific deletion of CFTR from murine β cells did not affect β cell function. In human islets, CFTR mRNA was minimally expressed, and CFTR protein and electrical activity were not detected. Isolated CF/CFRD islets demonstrated appropriate insulin and glucagon secretion, with few changes in key islet-regulatory transcripts. Furthermore, approximately 65% of β cell area was lost in CF donors, compounded by pancreatic remodeling and immune infiltration of the islet. These results indicate that CFRD is caused by β cell loss and intraislet inflammation in the setting of a complex pleiotropic disease and not by intrinsic islet dysfunction from CFTR mutation.
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17 MeSH Terms
α Cell Function and Gene Expression Are Compromised in Type 1 Diabetes.
Brissova M, Haliyur R, Saunders D, Shrestha S, Dai C, Blodgett DM, Bottino R, Campbell-Thompson M, Aramandla R, Poffenberger G, Lindner J, Pan FC, von Herrath MG, Greiner DL, Shultz LD, Sanyoura M, Philipson LH, Atkinson M, Harlan DM, Levy SE, Prasad N, Stein R, Powers AC
(2018) Cell Rep 22: 2667-2676
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Animals, Case-Control Studies, Cellular Reprogramming, Child, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1, Female, Gene Expression Regulation, Glucagon, Glucagon-Secreting Cells, Humans, Insulin Secretion, Insulin-Secreting Cells, Male, Mice, Middle Aged, Phenotype, Tissue Donors, Transcription Factors, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added March 8, 2018
Many patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) have residual β cells producing small amounts of C-peptide long after disease onset but develop an inadequate glucagon response to hypoglycemia following T1D diagnosis. The features of these residual β cells and α cells in the islet endocrine compartment are largely unknown, due to the difficulty of comprehensive investigation. By studying the T1D pancreas and isolated islets, we show that remnant β cells appeared to maintain several aspects of regulated insulin secretion. However, the function of T1D α cells was markedly reduced, and these cells had alterations in transcription factors constituting α and β cell identity. In the native pancreas and after placing the T1D islets into a non-autoimmune, normoglycemic in vivo environment, there was no evidence of α-to-β cell conversion. These results suggest an explanation for the disordered T1D counterregulatory glucagon response to hypoglycemia.
Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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4 Members
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21 MeSH Terms
TALK-1 reduces delta-cell endoplasmic reticulum and cytoplasmic calcium levels limiting somatostatin secretion.
Vierra NC, Dickerson MT, Jordan KL, Dadi PK, Katdare KA, Altman MK, Milian SC, Jacobson DA
(2018) Mol Metab 9: 84-97
MeSH Terms: Animals, Calcium Signaling, Cells, Cultured, Cytoplasm, Endoplasmic Reticulum, Glucagon, Humans, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Potassium Channels, Tandem Pore Domain, Somatostatin, Somatostatin-Secreting Cells
Show Abstract · Added February 7, 2018
OBJECTIVE - Single-cell RNA sequencing studies have revealed that the type-2 diabetes associated two-pore domain K (K2P) channel TALK-1 is abundantly expressed in somatostatin-secreting δ-cells. However, a physiological role for TALK-1 in δ-cells remains unknown. We previously determined that in β-cells, K flux through endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-localized TALK-1 channels enhances ER Ca leak, modulating Ca handling and insulin secretion. As glucose amplification of islet somatostatin release relies on Ca-induced Ca release (CICR) from the δ-cell ER, we investigated whether TALK-1 modulates δ-cell Ca handling and somatostatin secretion.
METHODS - To define the functions of islet δ-cell TALK-1 channels, we generated control and TALK-1 channel-deficient (TALK-1 KO) mice expressing fluorescent reporters specifically in δ- and α-cells to facilitate cell type identification. Using immunofluorescence, patch clamp electrophysiology, Ca imaging, and hormone secretion assays, we assessed how TALK-1 channel activity impacts δ- and α-cell function.
RESULTS - TALK-1 channels are expressed in both mouse and human δ-cells, where they modulate glucose-stimulated changes in cytosolic Ca and somatostatin secretion. Measurement of cytosolic Ca levels in response to membrane potential depolarization revealed enhanced CICR in TALK-1 KO δ-cells that could be abolished by depleting ER Ca with sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca ATPase (SERCA) inhibitors. Consistent with elevated somatostatin inhibitory tone, we observed significantly reduced glucagon secretion and α-cell Ca oscillations in TALK-1 KO islets, and found that blockade of α-cell somatostatin signaling with a somatostatin receptor 2 (SSTR2) antagonist restored glucagon secretion in TALK-1 KO islets.
CONCLUSIONS - These data indicate that TALK-1 reduces δ-cell cytosolic Ca elevations and somatostatin release by limiting δ-cell CICR, modulating the intraislet paracrine signaling mechanisms that control glucagon secretion.
Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.
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13 MeSH Terms
Hepatic Gi signaling regulates whole-body glucose homeostasis.
Rossi M, Zhu L, McMillin SM, Pydi SP, Jain S, Wang L, Cui Y, Lee RJ, Cohen AH, Kaneto H, Birnbaum MJ, Ma Y, Rotman Y, Liu J, Cyphert TJ, Finkel T, McGuinness OP, Wess J
(2018) J Clin Invest 128: 746-759
MeSH Terms: Animals, Blood Glucose, Extracellular Signal-Regulated MAP Kinases, Female, GTP-Binding Protein alpha Subunits, Gi-Go, Gene Expression Profiling, Glucagon, Gluconeogenesis, Glucose, Hepatocytes, Homeostasis, Humans, Liver, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Oxygen, Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases, Phosphorylation, Reactive Oxygen Species, Receptors, Glucagon, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
An increase in hepatic glucose production (HGP) is a key feature of type 2 diabetes. Excessive signaling through hepatic Gs-linked glucagon receptors critically contributes to pathologically elevated HGP. Here, we tested the hypothesis that this metabolic impairment can be counteracted by enhancing hepatic Gi signaling. Specifically, we used a chemogenetic approach to selectively activate Gi-type G proteins in mouse hepatocytes in vivo. Unexpectedly, activation of hepatic Gi signaling triggered a pronounced increase in HGP and severely impaired glucose homeostasis. Moreover, increased Gi signaling stimulated glucose release in human hepatocytes. A lack of functional Gi-type G proteins in hepatocytes reduced blood glucose levels and protected mice against the metabolic deficits caused by the consumption of a high-fat diet. Additionally, we delineated a signaling cascade that links hepatic Gi signaling to ROS production, JNK activation, and a subsequent increase in HGP. Taken together, our data support the concept that drugs able to block hepatic Gi-coupled GPCRs may prove beneficial as antidiabetic drugs.
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23 MeSH Terms