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Spin-lock imaging of 3-o-methyl-D glucose (3oMG) in brain tumors.
Zu Z, Jiang X, Xu J, Gore JC
(2018) Magn Reson Med 80: 1110-1117
MeSH Terms: 3-O-Methylglucose, Animals, Brain, Brain Neoplasms, Cell Line, Tumor, Contrast Media, Diagnosis, Computer-Assisted, Glioblastoma, Glucose, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Neoplasm Transplantation, Neuroimaging, Rats
Added March 14, 2018
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14 MeSH Terms
Measurement of APT using a combined CERT-AREX approach with varying duty cycles.
Zu Z, Li H, Xu J, Zhang XY, Zaiss M, Li K, Does MD, Gore JC, Gochberg DF
(2017) Magn Reson Imaging 42: 22-31
MeSH Terms: Amides, Animals, Brain, Brain Neoplasms, Disease Models, Animal, Glioblastoma, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Phantoms, Imaging, Protons, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
The goal is to develop an imaging method where contrast reflects amide-water magnetization exchange, with minimal signal contributions from other sources. Conventional chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging of amides (often called amide proton transfer, or APT, and quantified by the metric MTR) is confounded by several factors unrelated to amides, such as aliphatic protons, water relaxation, and macromolecular magnetization transfer. In this work, we examined the effects of combining our previous chemical exchange rotation (CERT) approach with the non-linear AREX method while using different duty cycles (DC) for the label and reference scans. The dependencies of this approach, named AREX, on tissue parameters, including T, T, semi-solid component concentration (f), relayed nuclear Overhauser enhancement (rNOE), and nearby amines, were studied through numerical simulations and control sample experiments at 9.4T and 1μT irradiation. Simulations and experiments show that AREX is sensitive to amide-water exchange effects, but is relatively insensitive to T, T, f, nearby amine, and distant aliphatic protons, while the conventional metric MTR as well as several other APT imaging methods, are significantly affected by at least some of these confounding factors.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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2 Members
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12 MeSH Terms
Spin-lock imaging of exogenous exchange-based contrast agents to assess tissue pH.
Zu Z, Li H, Jiang X, Gore JC
(2018) Magn Reson Med 79: 298-305
MeSH Terms: Animals, Brain, Brain Neoplasms, Contrast Media, Glioblastoma, Hydrogen-Ion Concentration, Iohexol, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Mannitol, Models, Theoretical, Phantoms, Imaging, Rats
Show Abstract · Added April 6, 2017
PURPOSE - Some X-ray contrast agents contain exchangeable protons that give rise to exchange-based effects on MRI, including chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST). However, CEST has poor specificity to explicit exchange parameters. Spin-lock sequences at high field are also sensitive to chemical exchange. Here, we evaluate whether spin-locking techniques can detect the contrast agent iohexol in vivo after intravenous administration, and their potential for measuring changes in tissue pH.
METHODS - Two metrics of contrast based on R , the spin lattice relaxation rate in the rotating frame, were derived from the behavior of R at different locking fields. Solutions containing iohexol at different concentrations and pH were used to evaluate the ability of the two metrics to quantify exchange effects. Images were also acquired from rat brains bearing tumors before and after intravenous injections of iohexol to evaluate the potential of spin-lock techniques for detecting the agent and pH variations.
RESULTS - The two metrics were found to depend separately on either agent concentration or pH. Spin-lock imaging may therefore provide specific quantification of iohexol concentration and the iohexol-water exchange rate, which reports on pH.
CONCLUSIONS - Spin-lock techniques may be used to assess the dynamics of intravenous contrast agents and detect extracellular acidification. Magn Reson Med 79:298-305, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.
© 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.
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12 MeSH Terms
Characterizing cell subsets using marker enrichment modeling.
Diggins KE, Greenplate AR, Leelatian N, Wogsland CE, Irish JM
(2017) Nat Methods 14: 275-278
MeSH Terms: Algorithms, Biomarkers, Brain Neoplasms, Computational Biology, Flow Cytometry, Glioblastoma, Humans, Single-Cell Analysis, T-Lymphocytes
Show Abstract · Added February 4, 2017
Learning cell identity from high-content single-cell data presently relies on human experts. We present marker enrichment modeling (MEM), an algorithm that objectively describes cells by quantifying contextual feature enrichment and reporting a human- and machine-readable text label. MEM outperforms traditional metrics in describing immune and cancer cell subsets from fluorescence and mass cytometry. MEM provides a quantitative language to communicate characteristics of new and established cytotypes observed in complex tissues.
3 Communities
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9 MeSH Terms
Decreased survival in glioblastomas is specific to contact with the ventricular-subventricular zone, not subgranular zone or corpus callosum.
Mistry AM, Dewan MC, White-Dzuro GA, Brinson PR, Weaver KD, Thompson RC, Ihrie RA, Chambless LB
(2017) J Neurooncol 132: 341-349
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Brain Neoplasms, Corpus Callosum, Female, Glioblastoma, Humans, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, Karnofsky Performance Status, Lateral Ventricles, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Retrospective Studies, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added March 12, 2017
The clinical effect of radiographic contact of glioblastoma (GBM) with neurogenic zones (NZ)-the ventricular-subventricular (VSVZ) and subgranular (SGZ) zones-and the corpus callosum (CC) remains unclear and, in the case of the SGZ, unexplored. We investigated (1) if GBM contact with a NZ correlates with decreased survival; (2) if so, whether this effect is associated with a specific NZ; and (3) if radiographic contact with or invasion of the CC by GBM is associated with decreased survival. We retrospectively identified 207 adult patients who underwent cytoreductive surgery for GBM followed by chemotherapy and/or radiation. Age, preoperative Karnofsky performance status score (KPS), and extent of resection were recorded. Preoperative MRIs were blindly analyzed to calculate tumor volume and assess its contact with VSVZ, SGZ, CC, and cortex. Overall (OS) and progression free (PFS) survivals were calculated and analyzed with multivariate Cox analyses. Among the 207 patients, 111 had GBM contacting VSVZ (VSVZ+GBMs), 23 had SGZ+GBMs, 52 had CC+GBMs, and 164 had cortex+GBMs. VSVZ+, SGZ+, and CC+ GBMs were significantly larger in size relative to their respective non-contacting controls. Multivariate Cox survival analyses revealed GBM contact with the VSVZ, but not SGZ, CC, or cortex, as an independent predictor of lower OS, PFS, and early recurrence. We hypothesize that the VSVZ niche has unique properties that contribute to GBM pathobiology in adults.
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16 MeSH Terms
Influence of glioblastoma contact with the lateral ventricle on survival: a meta-analysis.
Mistry AM, Hale AT, Chambless LB, Weaver KD, Thompson RC, Ihrie RA
(2017) J Neurooncol 131: 125-133
MeSH Terms: Brain Neoplasms, Disease Progression, Glioblastoma, Humans, Kaplan-Meier Estimate, Lateral Ventricles
Show Abstract · Added March 12, 2017
The ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ), which lies in the walls of the lateral ventricles (LV), is the largest neurogenic niche within the adult brain. Whether radiographic contact with the LV influences survival in glioblastoma (GBM) patients remains unclear. We assimilated and analyzed published data comparing survival in GBM patients with (LV+GBM) and without (LV-GBM) radiographic LV contact. PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane electronic databases were searched. Fifteen studies with survival data on LV+GBM and LV-GBM patients were identified. Their Kaplan-Meier survival curves were digitized and pooled for generation of median overall (OS) and progression free (PFS) survivals and log-rank hazard ratios (HRs). The log-rank and reported multivariate HRs after accounting for the common predictors of GBM survival were analyzed separately by meta-analyses. The calculated median survivals (months) from pooled data were 12.95 and 16.58 (OS), and 4.54 and 6.25 (PFS) for LV+GBMs and LV-GBMs, respectively, with an overall log-rank HRs of 1.335 [1.204-1.513] (OS) and 1.387 [1.225-1.602] (PFS). Meta-analysis of log-rank HRs resulted in summary HRs of 1.58 [1.35-1.85] (OS, 10 studies) and 1.41 [1.22-1.64] (PFS, 5 studies). Meta-analysis of multivariate HRs resulted in summary HRs of 1.35 [1.14-1.58] (OS, 6 studies) and 1.64 [0.88-3.05] (PFS, 3 studies). Patients with GBM contacting the LV have lower survival. This effect may be independent of the common predictors of GBM survival, suggesting a clinical influence of V-SVZ contact on GBM biology.
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6 MeSH Terms
Head of the Class: OLIG2 and Glioblastoma Phenotype.
Leelatian N, Ihrie RA
(2016) Cancer Cell 29: 613-615
MeSH Terms: Brain Neoplasms, Glioblastoma, Humans, Phenotype, Transcription Factors
Show Abstract · Added March 12, 2017
Genomic mapping has driven the classification of glioblastoma into distinct molecular subclasses, but mechanisms that regulate tumor subclass phenotypes are only now emerging. In this issue of Cancer Cell, Lu et al. describe a phenotypic switch from PDGFRA-enriched "proneural" to EGFR-enriched "classical" features in glioblastoma upon ablation of Olig2.
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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5 MeSH Terms
Cox-2-derived PGE2 induces Id1-dependent radiation resistance and self-renewal in experimental glioblastoma.
Cook PJ, Thomas R, Kingsley PJ, Shimizu F, Montrose DC, Marnett LJ, Tabar VS, Dannenberg AJ, Benezra R
(2016) Neuro Oncol 18: 1379-89
MeSH Terms: Animals, Blotting, Western, Brain Neoplasms, Chromatin Immunoprecipitation, Cyclooxygenase 2, Dinoprostone, Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay, Gene Knockdown Techniques, Glioblastoma, Humans, Immunohistochemistry, Inhibitor of Differentiation Protein 1, Mice, Radiation Tolerance, Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added April 12, 2019
BACKGROUND - In glioblastoma (GBM), Id1 serves as a functional marker for self-renewing cancer stem-like cells. We investigated the mechanism by which cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2)-derived prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) induces Id1 and increases GBM self-renewal and radiation resistance.
METHODS - Mouse and human GBM cells were stimulated with dimethyl-PGE2 (dmPGE2), a stabilized form of PGE2, to test for Id1 induction. To elucidate the signal transduction pathway governing the increase in Id1, a combination of short interfering RNA knockdown and small molecule inhibitors and activators of PGE2 signaling were used. Western blotting, quantitative real-time (qRT)-PCR, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays were employed. Sphere formation and radiation resistance were measured in cultured primary cells. Immunohistochemical analyses were carried out to evaluate the Cox-2-Id1 axis in experimental GBM.
RESULTS - In GBM cells, dmPGE2 stimulates the EP4 receptor leading to activation of ERK1/2 MAPK. This leads, in turn, to upregulation of the early growth response1 (Egr1) transcription factor and enhanced Id1 expression. Activation of this pathway increases self-renewal capacity and resistance to radiation-induced DNA damage, which are dependent on Id1.
CONCLUSIONS - In GBM, Cox-2-derived PGE2 induces Id1 via EP4-dependent activation of MAPK signaling and the Egr1 transcription factor. PGE2-mediated induction of Id1 is required for optimal tumor cell self-renewal and radiation resistance. Collectively, these findings identify Id1 as a key mediator of PGE2-dependent modulation of radiation response and lend insight into the mechanisms underlying radiation resistance in GBM patients.
© The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
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MeSH Terms
Added value of amide proton transfer imaging to conventional and perfusion MR imaging for evaluating the treatment response of newly diagnosed glioblastoma.
Park KJ, Kim HS, Park JE, Shim WH, Kim SJ, Smith SA
(2016) Eur Radiol 26: 4390-4403
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Amides, Brain Neoplasms, Contrast Media, Female, Glioblastoma, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Protons, ROC Curve, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added April 6, 2017
OBJECTIVES - To determine the added value of amide proton transfer (APT) imaging to conventional and perfusion MRI for differentiating tumour progression (TP) from the treatment-related effect (TE) in patients with post-treatment glioblastomas.
METHODS - Sixty-five consecutive patients with enlarging contrast-enhancing lesions following concurrent chemoradiotherapy were assessed using contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MRI (CE-T1WI), 90th percentile histogram parameters of normalized cerebral blood volume (nCBV90) and APT asymmetry value (APT90). Diagnostic performance was determined using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and cross validations.
RESULTS - There were statistically significant differences in the mean APT90 between the TP and the TE groups (3.87-4.01 % vs. 1.38-1.41 %; P < .001). Compared with CE-T1WI alone, the addition of APT90 to CE-T1WI significantly improved cross-validated AUC from 0.58-0.74 to 0.89-0.91 for differentiating TP from TE. The combination of CE-T1WI, nCBV90 and APT90 resulted in greater diagnostic accuracy for differentiating TP from TE than the combination of CE-T1WI and nCBV90 (cross-validated AUC, 0.95-0.97 vs. 0.84-0.91). The inter-reader agreement between the expert and trainee was excellent for the measurements of APT90 (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.94).
CONCLUSION - Adding APT imaging to conventional and perfusion MRI improves the diagnostic performance for differentiating TP from TE.
KEY POINTS - • APT imaging could provide a reliable distinction between TP and TE • Adding APT imaging to CE-T1WI improved the diagnostic accuracy versus CE-T1WI alone • Multimodal imaging using CE-T1WI, perfusion and APT imaging led to accurate diagnosis • The inter-reader agreement of APT histogram parameters was excellent.
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14 MeSH Terms
InsR/IGF1R Pathway Mediates Resistance to EGFR Inhibitors in Glioblastoma.
Ma Y, Tang N, Thompson RC, Mobley BC, Clark SW, Sarkaria JN, Wang J
(2016) Clin Cancer Res 22: 1767-76
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antineoplastic Agents, Cell Line, Tumor, Disease Models, Animal, Drug Resistance, Neoplasm, ErbB Receptors, Gefitinib, Glioblastoma, Humans, Insulin, Insulin-Like Growth Factor I, Mice, Protein Kinase Inhibitors, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt, Quinazolines, Receptor, IGF Type 1, Receptor, Insulin, Signal Transduction, Tumor Burden, Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
Show Abstract · Added April 18, 2017
PURPOSE - Aberrant activation of EGFR is a hallmark of glioblastoma. However, EGFR inhibitors exhibit at best modest efficacy in glioblastoma. This is in sharp contrast with the observations in EGFR-mutant lung cancer. We examined whether activation of functionally redundant receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) conferred resistance to EGFR inhibitors in glioblastoma.
EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN - We collected a panel of patient-derived glioblastoma xenograft (PDX) lines that maintained expression of wild-type or mutant EGFR in serial xenotransplantation and tissue cultures. Using this physiologically relevant platform, we tested the abilities of several RTK ligands to protect glioblastoma cells against an EGFR inhibitor, gefitinib. Based on the screening results, we further developed a combination therapy cotargeting EGFR and insulin receptor (InsR)/insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R).
RESULTS - Insulin and IGF1 induced significant protection against gefitinib in the majority of EGFR-dependent PDX lines with one exception that did not express InsR or IGF1R. Blockade of the InsR/IGF1R pathway synergistically improved sensitivity to gefitinib or dacomitinib. Gefitinib alone effectively attenuated EGFR activities and the downstream MEK/ERK pathway. However, repression of AKT and induction of apoptosis required concurrent inhibition of both EGFR and InsR/IGF1R. A combination of gefitinib and OSI-906, a dual InsR/IGF1R inhibitor, was more effective than either agent alone to treat subcutaneous glioblastoma xenograft tumors.
CONCLUSIONS - Our results suggest that activation of the InsR/IGF1R pathway confers resistance to EGFR inhibitors in EGFR-dependent glioblastoma through AKT regulation. Concurrent blockade of these two pathways holds promise to treat EGFR-dependent glioblastoma.
©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.
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20 MeSH Terms