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Synergistic effects of GDNF and VEGF on lifespan and disease progression in a familial ALS rat model.
Krakora D, Mulcrone P, Meyer M, Lewis C, Bernau K, Gowing G, Zimprich C, Aebischer P, Svendsen CN, Suzuki M
(2013) Mol Ther 21: 1602-10
MeSH Terms: Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Animals, Cell Survival, Disease Models, Animal, Disease Progression, Female, Gene Expression, Gene Transfer Techniques, Genetic Therapy, Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor, Humans, Longevity, Male, Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation, Mesenchymal Stem Cells, Motor Neurons, Muscle, Skeletal, Neuromuscular Junction, Rats, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A
Show Abstract · Added January 14, 2014
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by the progressive loss of motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord. We have recently shown that human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) modified to release glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) decrease disease progression in a rat model of ALS when delivered to skeletal muscle. In the current study, we determined whether or not this effect could be enhanced by delivering GDNF in concert with other trophic factors. hMSC engineered to secrete GDNF (hMSC-GDNF), vascular endothelial growth factor (hMSC-VEGF), insulin-like growth factor-I (hMSC-IGF-I), or brain-derived neurotrophic factor (hMSC-BDNF), were prepared and transplanted bilaterally into three muscle groups. hMSC-GDNF and hMSC-VEGF prolonged survival and slowed the loss of motor function, but hMSC-IGF-I and hMSC-BDNF did not have any effect. We then tested the efficacy of a combined ex vivo delivery of GDNF and VEGF in extending survival and protecting neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) and motor neurons. Interestingly, the combined delivery of these neurotrophic factors showed a strong synergistic effect. These studies further support ex vivo gene therapy approaches for ALS that target skeletal muscle.
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20 MeSH Terms
Intermittent hypoxia and stem cell implants preserve breathing capacity in a rodent model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.
Nichols NL, Gowing G, Satriotomo I, Nashold LJ, Dale EA, Suzuki M, Avalos P, Mulcrone PL, McHugh J, Svendsen CN, Mitchell GS
(2013) Am J Respir Crit Care Med 187: 535-42
MeSH Terms: Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Animals, Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor, Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor, Hypoxia, Inspiratory Capacity, Male, Motor Neurons, Phrenic Nerve, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Rats, Transgenic, Respiratory Insufficiency, Respiratory Therapy, Stem Cell Transplantation, Superoxide Dismutase
Show Abstract · Added January 14, 2014
RATIONALE - Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating motor neuron disease causing paralysis and death from respiratory failure. Strategies to preserve and/or restore respiratory function are critical for successful treatment. Although breathing capacity is maintained until late in disease progression in rodent models of familial ALS (SOD1(G93A) rats and mice), reduced numbers of phrenic motor neurons and decreased phrenic nerve activity are observed. Decreased phrenic motor output suggests imminent respiratory failure.
OBJECTIVES - To preserve or restore phrenic nerve activity in SOD1(G93A) rats at disease end stage.
METHODS - SOD1(G93A) rats were injected with human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) bracketing the phrenic motor nucleus before disease onset, or exposed to acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH) at disease end stage.
MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS - The capacity to generate phrenic motor output in anesthetized rats at disease end stage was: (1) transiently restored by a single presentation of AIH; and (2) preserved ipsilateral to hNPC transplants made before disease onset. hNPC transplants improved ipsilateral phrenic motor neuron survival.
CONCLUSIONS - AIH-induced respiratory plasticity and stem cell therapy have complementary translational potential to treat breathing deficits in patients with ALS.
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16 MeSH Terms
Eicosanoid receptor subtype-mediated opposing regulation of TLR-stimulated expression of astrocyte glial-derived neurotrophic factor.
Li X, Cudaback E, Breyer RM, Montine KS, Keene CD, Montine TJ
(2012) FASEB J 26: 3075-83
MeSH Terms: Animals, Astrocytes, Base Sequence, Cells, Cultured, DNA Primers, Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor, Immunity, Innate, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Models, Biological, Receptors, Eicosanoid, Receptors, Prostaglandin E, EP1 Subtype, Toll-Like Receptor 2, Toll-Like Receptor 3, Toll-Like Receptor 4, Toll-Like Receptor 9, Toll-Like Receptors
Show Abstract · Added December 21, 2013
A major therapeutic target for Parkinson's disease (PD) is providing increased glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) to dopaminergic neurons. We tested the hypothesis that innate immune activation increases astrocyte GDNF production and that this is regulated by specific eicosanoid receptors. Innate immune-activated primary murine astrocytes were assayed for GDNF expression and secretion. Controls were agent vehicle exposure and wild-type mice. Rank order for up to 10-fold selectively increased GDNF expression was activators of TLR3 > TLR2 or TLR4 > TLR9. TLR3 activator-stimulated GDNF expression was selectively JNK-dependent, followed cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, was coincident with membranous PGE(2) synthase, and was not significantly altered by a nonspecific COX- or a COX-2-selective inhibitor. Specific eicosanoid receptors had opposing effects on TLR3 activator-induced GDNF expression: ∼60% enhancement by blocking or ablating of PGE(2) receptor subtype 1 (EP1), ∼30% enhancement by activating PGF(2α) receptor or thromboxane receptor, or ∼15% enhancement by activating EP4. These results demonstrate functionally antagonistic eicosanoid receptor subtype regulation of innate immunity-induced astrocyte GDNF expression and suggest that selective inhibition of EP1 signaling might be a means to augment astrocyte GDNF secretion in the context of innate immune activation in diseased regions of brain in PD.
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18 MeSH Terms
Triggering endogenous neuroprotective processes through exercise in models of dopamine deficiency.
Zigmond MJ, Cameron JL, Leak RK, Mirnics K, Russell VA, Smeyne RJ, Smith AD
(2009) Parkinsonism Relat Disord 15 Suppl 3: S42-5
MeSH Terms: 1-Methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine, Animals, Disease Models, Animal, Dopamine, Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor, Humans, Mice, Neurons, Oxidopamine, Parkinson Disease, Secondary, Physical Conditioning, Animal, Rats
Show Abstract · Added May 19, 2014
We are testing the hypothesis that exercise is neuroprotective in animal models of the dopamine (DA) deficiency in Parkinson's disease. Our studies include mice or rats provided access to a running wheel and subsequently treated with MPTP (mice) or 6-hydroxydopamine (rats) and monkeys provided access to a treadmill and subsequently treated with MPTP. Typically, the exercise occurs for 3 months prior to the toxin treatment and often for 1-2 months thereafter. Our findings indicate that exercise reduces the behavioral impairments elicited by the dopaminergic neurotoxins as well as the loss of DA neurons as assessed by PET imaging and biochemical or histochemical assessment of tissue samples. Our studies are focused on one of several possible explanations for the beneficial effects of exercise: an exercise-induced increase in the expression of neurotrophic factors, particularly GDNF. Our observations indicate that GDNF can reduce the vulnerability of DA neurons, in part due to the activation of key intracellular cascades. We also find that mild cellular stress itself can provide protection against more intensive stress, a form of preconditioning. We conclude that dopamine neurons have the capacity to respond to intracellular and extracellular signals by triggering endogenous neuroprotective mechanisms. This raises the possibility that some individuals with Parkinson's disease suffer from a reduction of these neuroprotective mechanisms, and that treatments that boost these mechanisms - including exercise - may provide therapeutic benefit.
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12 MeSH Terms
SULF1 and SULF2 regulate heparan sulfate-mediated GDNF signaling for esophageal innervation.
Ai X, Kitazawa T, Do AT, Kusche-Gullberg M, Labosky PA, Emerson CP
(2007) Development 134: 3327-38
MeSH Terms: Animals, Esophagus, Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor, Heparitin Sulfate, Mice, Mice, Mutant Strains, Muscle Contraction, Muscle, Skeletal, Myocytes, Smooth Muscle, Neurites, Neuroglia, Neurons, Peripheral Nervous System, Signal Transduction, Sulfatases, Sulfotransferases
Show Abstract · Added July 20, 2010
Heparan sulfate (HS) plays an essential role in extracellular signaling during development. Biochemical studies have established that HS binding to ligands and receptors is regulated by the fine 6-O-sulfated structure of HS; however, mechanisms that control sulfated HS structure and associated signaling functions in vivo are not known. Extracellular HS 6-O-endosulfatases, SULF1 and SULF2, are candidate enzymatic regulators of HS 6-O-sulfated structure and modulate HS-dependent signaling. To investigate Sulf regulation of developmental signaling, we have disrupted Sulf genes in mouse and identified redundant functions of Sulfs in GDNF-dependent neural innervation and enteric glial formation in the esophagus, resulting in esophageal contractile malfunction in Sulf1(-/-);Sulf2(-/-) mice. SULF1 is expressed in GDNF-expressing esophageal muscle and SULF2 in innervating neurons, establishing their direct functions in esophageal innervation. Biochemical and cell signaling studies show that Sulfs are the major regulators of HS 6-O-desulfation, acting to reduce GDNF binding to HS and to enhance GDNF signaling and neurite sprouting in the embryonic esophagus. The functional specificity of Sulfs in GDNF signaling during esophageal innervation was established by showing that the neurite sprouting is selectively dependent on GDNF, but not on neurotrophins or other signaling ligands. These findings provide the first in vivo evidence that Sulfs are essential developmental regulators of cellular HS 6-O-sulfation for matrix transmission and reception of GDNF signal from muscle to innervating neurons.
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16 MeSH Terms