Other search tools

About this data

The publication data currently available has been vetted by Vanderbilt faculty, staff, administrators and trainees. The data itself is retrieved directly from NCBI's PubMed and is automatically updated on a weekly basis to ensure accuracy and completeness.

If you have any questions or comments, please contact us.

Results: 1 to 10 of 116

Publication Record

Connections

Association of uterine fibroids with birthweight and gestational age.
Zhao SK, Wu P, Jones SH, Torstenson ES, Hartmann KE, Velez Edwards DR
(2020) Ann Epidemiol 50: 35-40.e2
MeSH Terms: Adult, Birth Weight, Cohort Studies, Female, Fetal Development, Gestational Age, Humans, Leiomyoma, Pregnancy, Prospective Studies, Ultrasonography, Uterine Neoplasms
Show Abstract · Added August 5, 2020
PURPOSE - To determine if fibroids or their characteristics are associated with birthweight and/or gestational age, and to assess the impact of race or ethnicity.
METHODS - Right from the Start (2000-2012) is a prospective cohort that enrolled women from the southern US in early pregnancy. Transvaginal ultrasounds were used to measure fibroid characteristics and confirm gestational age. Date of birth and birthweight were obtained from vital or medical records. We assessed whether fibroid presence, number, type, and volume were associated with birthweight and/or gestational age using multivariate analysis of covariance, accounting for a priori confounders.
RESULTS - Among 3926 women, 416 had one or more fibroids. Mean infant birthweight and gestational age were similar among women with and without fibroids. When adjusting for race or ethnicity, all associations were attenuated. Overall, women with and without fibroids had infants of similar birthweight (-20 grams, 95% confidence interval [CI] -77, 36) and gestational age (0.4 days, 95% CI -0.9, 1.8). Women with three or more fibroids were more likely to have lighter infants (-201 grams, 95% CI -345, -58).
CONCLUSIONS - Race or ethnicity substantially confounds the associations. The clinical belief that uterine fibroids impair fetal growth is supported only by a significant decrease in birthweight for women with multiple fibroids.
Copyright © 2020 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
12 MeSH Terms
Week-by-week alcohol consumption in early pregnancy and spontaneous abortion risk: a prospective cohort study.
Sundermann AC, Velez Edwards DR, Slaughter JC, Wu P, Jones SH, Torstenson ES, Hartmann KE
(2021) Am J Obstet Gynecol 224: 97.e1-97.e16
MeSH Terms: Abortion, Spontaneous, Adult, Alcohol Drinking, Cohort Studies, Female, Gestational Age, Humans, Pregnancy, Prenatal Care, Prospective Studies, Risk Factors, United States, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added August 5, 2020
BACKGROUND - Half of women use alcohol in the first weeks of gestation, but most stop once pregnancy is detected. The relationship between timing of alcohol use cessation in early pregnancy and spontaneous abortion risk has not been determined.
OBJECTIVE - This study aimed to evaluate the association between week-by-week alcohol consumption in early pregnancy and spontaneous abortion.
STUDY DESIGN - Participants in Right from the Start, a community-based prospective pregnancy cohort, were recruited from 8 metropolitan areas in the United States (2000-2012). In the first trimester, participants provided information about alcohol consumed in the prior 4 months, including whether they altered alcohol use; date of change in use; and frequency, amount, and type of alcohol consumed before and after change. We assessed the association between spontaneous abortion and week of alcohol use, cumulative weeks exposed, number of drinks per week, beverage type, and binge drinking.
RESULTS - Among 5353 participants, 49.7% reported using alcohol during early pregnancy and 12.0% miscarried. Median gestational age at change in alcohol use was 29 days (interquartile range, 15-35 days). Alcohol use during weeks 5 through 10 from last menstrual period was associated with increased spontaneous abortion risk, with risk peaking for use in week 9. Each successive week of alcohol use was associated with an 8% increase in spontaneous abortion relative to those who did not drink (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.08; 95% confidence interval, 1.04-1.12). This risk is cumulative. In addition, risk was not related to number of drinks per week, beverage type, or binge drinking.
CONCLUSION - Each additional week of alcohol exposure during the first trimester increases risk of spontaneous abortion, even at low levels of consumption and when excluding binge drinking.
Copyright © 2020 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
13 MeSH Terms
is associated with indomethacin treatment failure for patent ductus arteriosus.
Rooney SR, Shelton EL, Aka I, Shaffer CM, Clyman RI, Dagle JM, Ryckman K, Lewis TR, Reese J, Van Driest SL, Kannankeril PJ
(2019) Pharmacogenomics 20: 939-946
MeSH Terms: Cohort Studies, Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors, Cytochrome P-450 CYP2C9, Ductus Arteriosus, Patent, Female, Gestational Age, Humans, Indomethacin, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Infant, Premature, Male, Treatment Failure, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added July 28, 2020
To identify clinical andgenetic factors associated with indomethacin treatment failure in preterm neonates with patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). This is a multicenter cohort study of 144 preterm infants (22-32 weeks gestational age) at three centers who received at least one treatment course of indomethacin for PDA. Indomethacin failure was defined as requiring subsequent surgical intervention. In multivariate analysis, gestational age (AOR 0.76, 95% CI 0.60-0.96), surfactant use (AOR 9.77, 95% CI 1.15-83.26), and (AOR 3.74; 95% CI 1.34-10.44) were each associated with indomethacin failure. Age, surfactant use, and influence indomethacin treatment outcome in preterm infants with PDA. This combination of clinical and genetic factors may facilitate targeted indomethacin use for PDA.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
MeSH Terms
Gestational Age at Arrest of Development: An Alternative Approach for Assigning Time at Risk in Studies of Time-Varying Exposures and Miscarriage.
Sundermann AC, Mukherjee S, Wu P, Velez Edwards DR, Hartmann KE
(2019) Am J Epidemiol 188: 570-578
MeSH Terms: Abortion, Spontaneous, Adult, Cohort Studies, Female, Gestational Age, Humans, North Carolina, Pregnancy, Reproducibility of Results, Risk Factors, Tennessee, Texas, Time Factors, Ultrasonography, Prenatal, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added February 21, 2019
The time between arrest of pregnancy development and miscarriage represents a window in which the pregnancy is nonviable and not developing. In effect, the pregnancy loss has already occurred, and additional exposure cannot influence its outcome. However, epidemiologic studies of miscarriage traditionally use gestational age at miscarriage (GAM) to assign time in survival analyses, which overestimates duration of exposure and time at risk. In Right From the Start, a pregnancy cohort study (2000-2012), we characterized the gap between estimated gestational age at arrest of development (GAAD) and miscarriage using transvaginal ultrasound in 500 women recruited from 3 states (North Carolina, Tennessee, and Texas). We compared effect estimates from models using GAAD with GAM to assign time at risk through a simulation study of several exposure patterns with varying effect sizes. The median gap between GAAD and miscarriage was 23 days (interquartile range, 15-32). Use of GAAD decreased the bias and variance of the estimated association for time-varying exposures, whereas half the time using GAM led to estimates that differed from the true effect by more than 20%. Using GAAD to assign time at risk should result in more accurate and consistent characterization of miscarriage risk associated with time-varying exposures.
© The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
15 MeSH Terms
PDA-TOLERATE Trial: An Exploratory Randomized Controlled Trial of Treatment of Moderate-to-Large Patent Ductus Arteriosus at 1 Week of Age.
Clyman RI, Liebowitz M, Kaempf J, Erdeve O, Bulbul A, Håkansson S, Lindqvist J, Farooqi A, Katheria A, Sauberan J, Singh J, Nelson K, Wickremasinghe A, Dong L, Hassinger DC, Aucott SW, Hayashi M, Heuchan AM, Carey WA, Derrick M, Fernandez E, Sankar M, Leone T, Perez J, Serize A, PDA-TOLERATE (PDA: TO LEave it alone or Respond And Treat Early) Trial Investigators
(2019) J Pediatr 205: 41-48.e6
MeSH Terms: Acetaminophen, Conservative Treatment, Continuous Positive Airway Pressure, Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors, Ductus Arteriosus, Patent, Female, Gestational Age, Humans, Ibuprofen, Indomethacin, Infant, Extremely Premature, Infant, Newborn, Male, Prospective Studies, Single-Blind Method, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added March 23, 2019
OBJECTIVE - To compare early routine pharmacologic treatment of moderate-to-large patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) at the end of week 1 with a conservative approach that requires prespecified respiratory and hemodynamic criteria before treatment can be given.
STUDY DESIGN - A total of 202 neonates of <28 weeks of gestation age (mean, 25.8 ± 1.1 weeks) with moderate-to-large PDA shunts were enrolled between age 6 and 14 days (mean, 8.1 ± 2.2 days) into an exploratory randomized controlled trial.
RESULTS - At enrollment, 49% of the patients were intubated and 48% required nasal ventilation or continuous positive airway pressure. There were no differences between the groups in either our primary outcome of ligation or presence of a PDA at discharge (early routine treatment [ERT], 32%; conservative treatment [CT], 39%) or any of our prespecified secondary outcomes of necrotizing enterocolitis (ERT, 16%; CT, 19%), bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) (ERT, 49%; CT, 53%), BPD/death (ERT, 58%; CT, 57%), death (ERT,19%; CT, 10%), and weekly need for respiratory support. Fewer infants in the ERT group met the rescue criteria (ERT, 31%; CT, 62%). In secondary exploratory analyses, infants receiving ERT had significantly less need for inotropic support (ERT, 13%; CT, 25%). However, among infants who were ≥26 weeks gestational age, those receiving ERT took significantly longer to achieve enteral feeding of 120 mL/kg/day (median: ERT, 14 days [range, 4.5-19 days]; CT, 6 days [range, 3-14 days]), and had significantly higher incidences of late-onset non-coagulase-negative Staphylococcus bacteremia (ERT, 24%; CT,6%) and death (ERT, 16%; CT, 2%).
CONCLUSIONS - In preterm infants age <28 weeks with moderate-to-large PDAs who were receiving respiratory support after the first week, ERT did not reduce PDA ligations or the presence of a PDA at discharge and did not improve any of the prespecified secondary outcomes, but delayed full feeding and was associated with higher rates of late-onset sepsis and death in infants born at ≥26 weeks of gestation.
TRIAL REGISTRATION - ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01958320.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
16 MeSH Terms
Erythematous plaques and papules on a premature infant.
Riemenschneider K, Redenius R, Reese J, Fine JD, Weitkamp JH, Tkaczyk E
(2017) J Am Acad Dermatol 76: e111-e112
MeSH Terms: Anti-Bacterial Agents, Apgar Score, Biopsy, Needle, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Gestational Age, Humans, Immunohistochemistry, Impetigo, Infant, Newborn, Infant, Premature, Male, Pregnancy, Pregnancy Complications, Infectious, Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn, Streptococcal Infections, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added March 31, 2018
A 2240 gram boy was born at 33.2 weeks gestation with nonblanching, deeply erythematous plaques and papules on the back, flanks, and scalp (Figure 1). His mother was GBS positive and on antibiotic suppression for prior cutaneous MRSA and urinary tract infections. Intrapartum intravenous Penicillin G was administered, and the amniotic sac was artificially ruptured 4 hours prior to delivery to facilitate labor. The delivery was uncomplicated without concern for chorioamnionitis, but the patient initially required CPAP for respiratory distress with 1-minute and 5-minute Apgar scores of 7 and 8, respectively. A skin punch biopsy is shown (Figure 2).
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
MeSH Terms
Inverse Relationship between Soluble RAGE and Risk for Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia.
Benjamin JT, van der Meer R, Slaughter JC, Steele S, Plosa EJ, Sucre JM, Moore PE, Aschner JL, Blackwell TS, Young LR
(2018) Am J Respir Crit Care Med 197: 1083-1086
MeSH Terms: Biomarkers, Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia, California, Female, Gestational Age, Humans, Infant, Low Birth Weight, Infant, Newborn, Infant, Premature, Male, Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products, Risk Factors
Added March 21, 2018
0 Communities
3 Members
0 Resources
12 MeSH Terms
Bronze Baby Syndrome.
Le TN, Reese J
(2017) J Pediatr 188: 301-301.e1
MeSH Terms: Bilirubin, Gestational Age, Humans, Hyperpigmentation, Infant, Newborn, Infant, Premature, Jaundice, Neonatal, Male, Phototherapy, Prognosis, Syndrome
Added October 11, 2017
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
11 MeSH Terms
Comparing human and macaque placental transcriptomes to disentangle preterm birth pathology from gestational age effects.
Eidem HR, Rinker DC, Ackerman WE, Buhimschi IA, Buhimschi CS, Dunn-Fletcher C, Kallapur SG, Pavličev M, Muglia LJ, Abbot P, Rokas A
(2016) Placenta 41: 74-82
MeSH Terms: Animals, Female, Gene Expression, Gestational Age, Humans, Macaca mulatta, Placenta, Pregnancy, Premature Birth, RNA, Sequence Analysis, RNA, Transcriptome
Show Abstract · Added April 6, 2017
INTRODUCTION - A major issue in the transcriptomic study of spontaneous preterm birth (sPTB) in humans is the inability to collect healthy control tissue at the same gestational age (GA) to compare with pathologic preterm tissue. Thus, gene expression differences identified after the standard comparison of sPTB and term tissues necessarily reflect differences in both sPTB pathology and GA. One potential solution is to use GA-matched controls from a closely related species to tease apart genes that are dysregulated during sPTB from genes that are expressed differently as a result of GA effects.
METHODS - To disentangle genes whose expression levels are associated with sPTB pathology from those linked to GA, we compared RNA sequencing data from human preterm placentas, human term placentas, and rhesus macaque placentas at 80% completed gestation (serving as healthy non-human primate GA-matched controls). We first compared sPTB and term human placental transcriptomes to identify significantly differentially expressed genes. We then overlaid the results of the comparison between human sPTB and macaque placental transcriptomes to identify sPTB-specific candidates. Finally, we overlaid the results of the comparison between human term and macaque placental transcriptomes to identify GA-specific candidates.
RESULTS - Examination of relative expression for all human genes with macaque orthologs identified 267 candidate genes that were significantly differentially expressed between preterm and term human placentas. 29 genes were identified as sPTB-specific candidates and 37 as GA-specific candidates. Altogether, the 267 differentially expressed genes were significantly enriched for a variety of developmental, metabolic, reproductive, immune, and inflammatory functions. Although there were no notable differences between the functions of the 29 sPTB-specific and 37 GA-specific candidate genes, many of these candidates have been previously shown to be dysregulated in diverse pregnancy-associated pathologies.
DISCUSSION - By comparing human sPTB and term transcriptomes with GA-matched control transcriptomes from a closely related species, this study disentangled the confounding effects of sPTB pathology and GA, leading to the identification of 29 promising sPTB-specific candidate genes and 37 genes potentially related to GA effects. The apparent similarity in functions of the sPTB and GA candidates may suggest that the effects of sPTB and GA do not correspond to biologically distinct processes. Alternatively, it may reflect the poor state of knowledge of the transcriptional landscape underlying placental development and disease.
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
12 MeSH Terms
Effects of Advancing Gestation and Non-Caucasian Race on Ductus Arteriosus Gene Expression.
Waleh N, Barrette AM, Dagle JM, Momany A, Jin C, Hills NK, Shelton EL, Reese J, Clyman RI
(2015) J Pediatr 167: 1033-41.e2
MeSH Terms: Aorta, Continental Population Groups, DNA, Ductus Arteriosus, Ductus Arteriosus, Patent, Female, Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental, Genotype, Gestational Age, Humans, Indomethacin, Nitric Oxide Synthase Type III, Organic Anion Transporters, Oxygen, Polymerase Chain Reaction, Polymorphism, Genetic, Pregnancy, Pregnancy Trimester, Second, Regression Analysis, Signal Transduction, Time Factors
Show Abstract · Added February 21, 2016
OBJECTIVE - To identify genes affected by advancing gestation and racial/ethnic origin in human ductus arteriosus (DA).
STUDY DESIGN - We collected 3 sets of DA tissue (n = 93, n = 89, n = 91; total = 273 fetuses) from second trimester pregnancies. We examined four genes, with DNA polymorphisms that distribute along racial lines, to identify "Caucasian" and "non-Caucasian" DA. We used real time polymerase chain reaction to measure RNA expression of 48 candidate genes involved in functional closure of the DA, and used multivariable regression analyses to examine the relationships between advancing gestation, "non-Caucasian" race, and gene expression.
RESULTS - Mature gestation and non-Caucasian race are significant predictors for identifying infants who will close their patent DA when treated with indomethacin. Advancing gestation consistently altered gene expression in pathways involved with oxygen-induced constriction (eg, calcium-channels, potassium-channels, and endothelin signaling), contractile protein maturation, tissue remodeling, and prostaglandin and nitric oxide signaling in all 3 tissue sets. None of the pathways involved with oxygen-induced constriction appeared to be altered in "non-Caucasian" DA. Two genes, SLCO2A1 and NOS3, (involved with prostaglandin reuptake/metabolism and nitric oxide production, respectively) were consistently decreased in "non-Caucasian" DA.
CONCLUSIONS - Prostaglandins and nitric oxide are the most important vasodilators opposing DA closure. Indomethacin inhibits prostaglandin production, but not nitric oxide production. Because decreased SLCO2A1 and NOS3 expression can lead to increased prostaglandin and decreased nitric oxide concentrations, we speculate that prostaglandin-mediated vasodilation may play a more dominant role in maintaining the "non-Caucasian" patent DA, making it more likely to close when inhibited by indomethacin.
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
21 MeSH Terms