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α-Difluoromethylornithine reduces gastric carcinogenesis by causing mutations in .
Sierra JC, Suarez G, Piazuelo MB, Luis PB, Baker DR, Romero-Gallo J, Barry DP, Schneider C, Morgan DR, Peek RM, Gobert AP, Wilson KT
(2019) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 116: 5077-5085
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bacterial Proteins, Carcinogenesis, DNA Damage, Eflornithine, Gene Deletion, Gene Rearrangement, Gerbillinae, Helicobacter pylori, Male, Mutation, Oxidative Stress, RNA, Messenger, Stomach Neoplasms, Virulence
Show Abstract · Added February 26, 2019
Infection by is the primary cause of gastric adenocarcinoma. The most potent virulence factor is cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA), which is translocated by a type 4 secretion system (T4SS) into gastric epithelial cells and activates oncogenic signaling pathways. The gene encodes for a key component of the T4SS and can undergo gene rearrangements. We have shown that the cancer chemopreventive agent α-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), known to inhibit the enzyme ornithine decarboxylase, reduces -mediated gastric cancer incidence in Mongolian gerbils. In the present study, we questioned whether DFMO might directly affect pathogenicity. We show that output strains isolated from gerbils treated with DFMO exhibit reduced ability to translocate CagA in gastric epithelial cells. Further, we frequently detected genomic modifications in the middle repeat region of the gene of output strains from DFMO-treated animals, which were associated with alterations in the CagY protein. Gerbils did not develop carcinoma when infected with a DFMO output strain containing rearranged or the parental strain in which the wild-type was replaced by with DFMO-induced rearrangements. Lastly, we demonstrate that in vitro treatment of by DFMO induces oxidative DNA damage, expression of the DNA repair enzyme MutS2, and mutations in , demonstrating that DFMO directly affects genomic stability. Deletion of abrogated the ability of DFMO to induce rearrangements directly. In conclusion, DFMO-induced oxidative stress in leads to genomic alterations and attenuates virulence.
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15 MeSH Terms
Carcinogenic Strains Selectively Dysregulate the Gastric Proteome, Which May Be Associated with Stomach Cancer Progression.
Noto JM, Rose KL, Hachey AJ, Delgado AG, Romero-Gallo J, Wroblewski LE, Schneider BG, Shah SC, Cover TL, Wilson KT, Israel DA, Roa JC, Schey KL, Zavros Y, Piazuelo MB, Peek RM
(2019) Mol Cell Proteomics 18: 352-371
MeSH Terms: Animals, Carrier Proteins, Cell Line, Disease Models, Animal, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Gerbillinae, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Humans, Intestinal Mucosa, Male, Protein Interaction Maps, Proteomics, Stomach Neoplasms, Up-Regulation, Vesicular Transport Proteins
Show Abstract · Added December 16, 2018
is the strongest risk factor for gastric cancer. Initial interactions between and its host originate at the microbial-gastric epithelial cell interface, and contact between and gastric epithelium activates signaling pathways that drive oncogenesis. One microbial constituent that increases gastric cancer risk is the pathogenicity island, which encodes a type IV secretion system that translocates the effector protein, CagA, into host cells. We previously demonstrated that infection of Mongolian gerbils with a carcinogenic strain, 7.13, recapitulates many features of -induced gastric cancer in humans. Therefore, we sought to define gastric proteomic changes induced by that are critical for initiation of the gastric carcinogenic cascade. Gastric cell scrapings were harvested from -infected and uninfected gerbils for quantitative proteomic analyses using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ). Quantitative proteomic analysis of samples from two biological replicate experiments quantified a total of 2764 proteins, 166 of which were significantly altered in abundance by infection. Pathway mapping identified significantly altered inflammatory and cancer-signaling pathways that included Rab/Ras signaling proteins. Consistent with the iTRAQ results, RABEP2 and G3BP2 were significantly up-regulated , in primary human gastric monolayers, and in gerbil gastric epithelium following infection with strain 7.13 in a -dependent manner. Within human stomachs, RABEP2 and G3BP2 expression in gastric epithelium increased in parallel with the severity of premalignant and malignant lesions and was significantly elevated in intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia, as well as gastric adenocarcinoma, compared with gastritis alone. These results indicate that carcinogenic strains of induce dramatic and specific changes within the gastric proteome and that a subset of altered proteins within pathways with oncogenic potential may facilitate the progression of gastric carcinogenesis in humans.
© 2019 Noto et al.
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16 MeSH Terms
MEK Inhibitor Reverses Metaplasia and Allows Re-Emergence of Normal Lineages in Helicobacter pylori-Infected Gerbils.
Yang Q, Yasuda T, Choi E, Toyoda T, Roland JT, Uchida E, Yoshida H, Seto Y, Goldenring JR, Nomura S
(2019) Gastroenterology 156: 577-581.e4
MeSH Terms: Acrylonitrile, Aniline Compounds, Animals, Benzimidazoles, Biopsy, Needle, Disease Models, Animal, Gastric Mucosa, Gerbillinae, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Immunohistochemistry, Male, Metaplasia, Random Allocation, Reference Values, Treatment Outcome
Added November 14, 2018
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16 MeSH Terms
Epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition downregulates -induced epithelial inflammatory responses, DNA damage and gastric carcinogenesis.
Sierra JC, Asim M, Verriere TG, Piazuelo MB, Suarez G, Romero-Gallo J, Delgado AG, Wroblewski LE, Barry DP, Peek RM, Gobert AP, Wilson KT
(2018) Gut 67: 1247-1260
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antineoplastic Agents, Cell Culture Techniques, Epithelial Cells, ErbB Receptors, Gastritis, Gefitinib, Gerbillinae, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Quinazolines, Stomach Neoplasms
Show Abstract · Added June 29, 2017
OBJECTIVE - Gastric cancer is the third leading cause of cancer death worldwide and infection by is the strongest risk factor. We have reported increased epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) phosphorylation in the -induced human carcinogenesis cascade, and association with DNA damage. Our goal was to determine the role of EGFR activation in gastric carcinogenesis.
DESIGN - We evaluated gefitinib, a specific EGFR inhibitor, in chemoprevention of -induced gastric inflammation and cancer development. Mice with genetically targeted epithelial cell-specific deletion of ( mice) were also used.
RESULTS - In C57BL/6 mice, gefitinib decreased and expression by gastric epithelial cells, myeloperoxidase-positive inflammatory cells in the mucosa and epithelial DNA damage induced by infection. Similar reductions in chemokines, inflammatory cells and DNA damage occurred in infected versus control mice. In -infected transgenic insulin-gastrin (INS-GAS) mice and gerbils, gefitinib treatment markedly reduced dysplasia and carcinoma. Gefitinib blocked ri-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase 1/3 (MAPK1/3) and activator protein 1 in gastric epithelial cells, resulting in inhibition of chemokine synthesis. MAPK1/3 phosphorylation and JUN activation was reduced in gastric tissues from infected wild-type and INS-GAS mice treated with gefitinib and in primary epithelial cells from versus mice. Epithelial EGFR activation persisted in humans and mice after eradication, and gefitinib reduced gastric carcinoma in INS-GAS mice treated with antibiotics.
CONCLUSIONS - These findings suggest that epithelial EGFR inhibition represents a potential strategy to prevent development of gastric carcinoma in -infected individuals.
Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.
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2 Members
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14 MeSH Terms
Genetic Manipulation of Virulence Function by Host Carcinogenic Phenotypes.
Suarez G, Romero-Gallo J, Sierra JC, Piazuelo MB, Krishna US, Gomez MA, Wilson KT, Peek RM
(2017) Cancer Res 77: 2401-2412
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antigens, Bacterial, Bacterial Proteins, Carcinogenesis, Disease Models, Animal, Gastric Mucosa, Gerbillinae, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Humans, Risk Factors, Stomach Neoplasms
Show Abstract · Added February 18, 2017
is the strongest risk factor for gastric adenocarcinoma, yet only a minority of infected persons ever develop this malignancy. One cancer-linked locus is the type 4 secretion system (T4SS), which translocates an oncoprotein into host cells. A structural component of the T4SS is CagY, which becomes rapidly altered during adaptation in mice and rhesus monkeys, rendering the T4SS nonfunctional; however, these models rarely develop gastric cancer. We previously demonstrated that the strain 7.13 rapidly induces gastric cancer in Mongolian gerbils. We now use this model, in conjunction with samples from patients with premalignant lesions, to define the effects of a carcinogenic host environment on the virulence phenotype of to understand how only a subset of infected individuals develop cancer. sequence differences and T4SS function were directly related to the severity of inflammation in human gastric mucosa in either a synchronous or metachronous manner. Serial infections of Mongolian gerbils with strain 7.13 identified an oscillating pattern of T4SS function. The development of dysplasia or cancer selected for attenuated virulence phenotypes, but robust T4SS function could be restored upon infection of new hosts. Changes in the genetic composition of mirrored T4SS function, although the mechanisms of alterations differed in human isolates (mutations) versus gerbil isolates (addition/deletion of motifs). These results indicate that host carcinogenic phenotypes modify T4SS function via altering allowing the bacteria to persist and induce carcinogenic consequences in the gastric niche. .
©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.
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2 Members
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12 MeSH Terms
Dietary Composition Influences Incidence of Helicobacter pylori-Induced Iron Deficiency Anemia and Gastric Ulceration.
Beckett AC, Piazuelo MB, Noto JM, Peek RM, Washington MK, Algood HM, Cover TL
(2016) Infect Immun 84: 3338-3349
MeSH Terms: Anemia, Iron-Deficiency, Animal Feed, Animals, Diet, Gerbillinae, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Inflammation, Stomach Ulcer
Show Abstract · Added November 3, 2016
Epidemiologic studies have provided conflicting data regarding an association between Helicobacter pylori infection and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in humans. Here, a Mongolian gerbil model was used to investigate a potential role of H. pylori infection, as well as a possible role of diet, in H. pylori-associated IDA. Mongolian gerbils (either H. pylori infected or uninfected) received a normal diet or one of three diets associated with increased H. pylori virulence: high-salt, low-iron, or a combination of a high-salt and low-iron diet. In an analysis of all infected animals compared to uninfected animals (independent of diet), H. pylori-infected gerbils had significantly lower hemoglobin values than their uninfected counterparts at 16 weeks postinfection (P < 0.0001). The mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and serum ferritin values were significantly lower in H. pylori-infected gerbils than in uninfected gerbils, consistent with IDA. Leukocytosis and thrombocytosis were also detected in infected gerbils, indicating the presence of a systemic inflammatory response. In comparison to uninfected gerbils, H. pylori-infected gerbils had a higher gastric pH, a higher incidence of gastric ulcers, and a higher incidence of fecal occult blood loss. Anemia was associated with the presence of gastric ulceration but not gastric cancer. Infected gerbils consuming diets with a high salt content developed gastric ulcers significantly more frequently than gerbils consuming a normal-salt diet, and the lowest hemoglobin levels were in infected gerbils consuming a high-salt/low-iron diet. These data indicate that H. pylori infection can cause IDA and that the composition of the diet influences the incidence and severity of H. pylori-induced IDA.
Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.
0 Communities
4 Members
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9 MeSH Terms
Hydrogen Metabolism in Helicobacter pylori Plays a Role in Gastric Carcinogenesis through Facilitating CagA Translocation.
Wang G, Romero-Gallo J, Benoit SL, Piazuelo MB, Dominguez RL, Morgan DR, Peek RM, Maier RJ
(2016) mBio 7:
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antigens, Bacterial, Bacterial Proteins, Carcinogenesis, Cell Line, Cell Transformation, Neoplastic, Disease Models, Animal, Epithelial Cells, Gene Deletion, Gerbillinae, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Humans, Hydrogen, Hydrogenase, Protein Transport
Show Abstract · Added April 6, 2017
UNLABELLED - A known virulence factor of Helicobacter pylori that augments gastric cancer risk is the CagA cytotoxin. A carcinogenic derivative strain, 7.13, that has a greater ability to translocate CagA exhibits much higher hydrogenase activity than its parent noncarcinogenic strain, B128. A Δhyd mutant strain with deletion of hydrogenase genes was ineffective in CagA translocation into human gastric epithelial AGS cells, while no significant attenuation of cell adhesion was observed. The quinone reductase inhibitor 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide (HQNO) was used to specifically inhibit the H2-utilizing respiratory chain of outer membrane-permeabilized bacterial cells; that level of inhibitor also greatly attenuated CagA translocation into AGS cells, indicating the H2-generated transmembrane potential is a contributor to toxin translocation. The Δhyd strain showed a decreased frequency of DNA transformation, suggesting that H. pylori hydrogenase is also involved in energizing the DNA uptake apparatus. In a gerbil model of infection, the ability of the Δhyd strain to induce inflammation was significantly attenuated (at 12 weeks postinoculation), while all of the gerbils infected with the parent strain (7.13) exhibited a high level of inflammation. Gastric cancer developed in 50% of gerbils infected with the wild-type strain 7.13 but in none of the animals infected with the Δhyd strain. By examining the hydrogenase activities from well-defined clinical H. pylori isolates, we observed that strains isolated from cancer patients (n = 6) have a significantly higher hydrogenase (H2/O2) activity than the strains isolated from gastritis patients (n = 6), further supporting an association between H. pylori hydrogenase activity and gastric carcinogenesis in humans.
IMPORTANCE - Hydrogen-utilizing hydrogenases are known to be important for some respiratory pathogens to colonize hosts. Here a gastric cancer connection is made via a pathogen's (H. pylori) use of molecular hydrogen, a host microbiome-produced gas. Delivery of the known carcinogenic factor CagA into host cells is augmented by the H2-utilizing respiratory chain of the bacterium. The role of hydrogenase in carcinogenesis is demonstrated in an animal model, whereby inflammation markers and cancer development were attenuated in the hydrogenase-null strain. Hydrogenase activity comparisons of clinical strains of the pathogen also support a connection between hydrogen metabolism and gastric cancer risk. While molecular hydrogen use is acknowledged to be an alternative high-energy substrate for some pathogens, this work extends the roles of H2 oxidation to include transport of a carcinogenic toxin. The work provides a new avenue for exploratory treatment of some cancers via microflora alterations.
Copyright © 2016 Wang et al.
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16 MeSH Terms
The Mongolian Gerbil: A Robust Model of Helicobacter pylori-Induced Gastric Inflammation and Cancer.
Noto JM, Romero-Gallo J, Piazuelo MB, Peek RM
(2016) Methods Mol Biol 1422: 263-80
MeSH Terms: Animals, Disease Models, Animal, Gerbillinae, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Humans, Risk Factors, Stomach Neoplasms
Show Abstract · Added April 6, 2017
The Mongolian gerbil is an efficient, robust, and cost-effective rodent model that recapitulates many features of H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation and carcinogenesis in humans, allowing for targeted investigation of the bacterial determinants and environmental factors and, to a lesser degree, host constituents that govern H. pylori-mediated disease. This chapter discusses means through which the Mongolian gerbil model has been used to define mechanisms of H. pylori-inflammation and cancer as well as the current materials and methods for utilizing this model of microbially induced disease.
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2 Members
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8 MeSH Terms
Genetic Evolution of a Helicobacter pylori Acid-Sensing Histidine Kinase and Gastric Disease.
Krishna U, Romero-Gallo J, Suarez G, Azah A, Krezel AM, Varga MG, Forsyth MH, Peek RM
(2016) J Infect Dis 214: 644-8
MeSH Terms: Achlorhydria, Acids, Animals, Bacterial Proteins, Evolution, Molecular, Gastritis, Gerbillinae, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Histidine Kinase, Humans, Male, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Microbial Viability, Mutation, Missense
Show Abstract · Added April 6, 2017
Helicobacter pylori is the strongest risk factor for gastric adenocarcinoma, which develops within a hypochlorhydric environment. We sequentially isolated H. pylori (strain J99) from a patient who developed corpus-predominant gastritis and hypochlorhydia over a 6-year interval. Archival J99 survived significantly better under acidic conditions than recent J99 strains. H. pylori arsRS encodes a 2-component system critical for stress responses; recent J99 isolates harbored 2 nonsynonymous arsS mutations, and arsS inactivation abolished acid survival. In vivo, acid-resistant archival, but not recent J99, successfully colonized high-acid-secreting rodents. Thus, genetic evolution of arsS may influence progression to hypochlorhydia and gastric cancer.
© The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.
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15 MeSH Terms
Characterization of progressive metaplasia in the gastric corpus mucosa of Mongolian gerbils infected with Helicobacter pylori.
Shimizu T, Choi E, Petersen CP, Noto JM, Romero-Gallo J, Piazuelo MB, Washington MK, Peek RM, Goldenring JR
(2016) J Pathol 239: 399-410
MeSH Terms: Animals, Clusterin, Gastric Mucosa, Gerbillinae, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Inflammation, Male, Metaplasia, Mucin-4
Show Abstract · Added April 6, 2017
Spasmolytic polypeptide-expressing metaplasia (SPEM) and intestinal metaplasia are considered neoplastic precursors of gastric adenocarcinoma in humans. Loss of parietal cells causes the development of SPEM in the gastric corpus and then chronic inflammation drives SPEM toward a more proliferative lineage. Mongolian gerbils infected with Helicobacter pylori develop chronic gastritis and metaplasia, mimicking aspects of human gastritis with H. pylori infection. We therefore examined metaplastic lineages in the gastric corpus mucosa of gerbils infected by H. pylori strain 7.13, which produces rapid onset of severe inflammation. Six weeks following H. pylori infection, Griffonia simplicifolia lectin II (GSII)-positive SPEM developed in the base of oxyntic glands in association with parietal cell loss and inflammation. In association with severe inflammation, SPEM glands evolved into aberrant phenotypes, including branched lesions, dilated lesions, and penetrating invasive glands. Mucin 4 (MUC4) was up-regulated in SPEM and progressive SPEM. Clusterin was expressed in the tips of branched and dilated lesions and throughout regions of invasive glands. Intriguingly, clusterin-positive regions in these lesions expressed Ki67 and matrix metalloproteinase 7 (MMP-7). These same regions were also positive for expression of phospho-IkBα, suggestive of activated NFkB signalling. These findings suggest that clusterin-positive regions in progressive phenotypes of SPEM have invasive characteristics. Thus, H. pylori infection in gerbils induces SPEM, which then can progress to further aberrant and invasive metaplastic phenotypes. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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10 MeSH Terms