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RADX Promotes Genome Stability and Modulates Chemosensitivity by Regulating RAD51 at Replication Forks.
Dungrawala H, Bhat KP, Le Meur R, Chazin WJ, Ding X, Sharan SK, Wessel SR, Sathe AA, Zhao R, Cortez D
(2017) Mol Cell 67: 374-386.e5
MeSH Terms: A549 Cells, Animals, BRCA2 Protein, CRISPR-Cas Systems, DNA Breaks, Double-Stranded, DNA Repair, DNA, Neoplasm, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Drug Resistance, Neoplasm, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Genomic Instability, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Mice, Models, Molecular, Mutation, Neoplasms, Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase Inhibitors, Protein Binding, RNA Interference, Rad51 Recombinase, Replication Origin, Transfection
Show Abstract · Added March 24, 2018
RAD51 promotes homology-directed repair (HDR), replication fork reversal, and stalled fork protection. Defects in these functions cause genomic instability and tumorigenesis but also generate hypersensitivity to cancer therapeutics. Here we describe the identification of RADX as an RPA-like, single-strand DNA binding protein. RADX is recruited to replication forks, where it prevents fork collapse by regulating RAD51. When RADX is inactivated, excessive RAD51 activity slows replication elongation and causes double-strand breaks. In cancer cells lacking BRCA2, RADX deletion restores fork protection without restoring HDR. Furthermore, RADX inactivation confers chemotherapy and PARP inhibitor resistance to cancer cells with reduced BRCA2/RAD51 pathway function. By antagonizing RAD51 at forks, RADX allows cells to maintain a high capacity for HDR while ensuring that replication functions of RAD51 are properly regulated. Thus, RADX is essential to achieve the proper balance of RAD51 activity to maintain genome stability.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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23 MeSH Terms
Mms1 binds to G-rich regions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and influences replication and genome stability.
Wanzek K, Schwindt E, Capra JA, Paeschke K
(2017) Nucleic Acids Res 45: 7796-7806
MeSH Terms: Binding Sites, Cell Cycle, Cullin Proteins, DNA Helicases, DNA Replication, DNA, Fungal, Endodeoxyribonucleases, Exodeoxyribonucleases, G-Quadruplexes, GC Rich Sequence, Genomic Instability, Models, Biological, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
The regulation of replication is essential to preserve genome integrity. Mms1 is part of the E3 ubiquitin ligase complex that is linked to replication fork progression. By identifying Mms1 binding sites genome-wide in Saccharomyces cerevisiae we connected Mms1 function to genome integrity and replication fork progression at particular G-rich motifs. This motif can form G-quadruplex (G4) structures in vitro. G4 are stable DNA structures that are known to impede replication fork progression. In the absence of Mms1, genome stability is at risk at these G-rich/G4 regions as demonstrated by gross chromosomal rearrangement assays. Mms1 binds throughout the cell cycle to these G-rich/G4 regions and supports the binding of Pif1 DNA helicase. Based on these data we propose a mechanistic model in which Mms1 binds to specific G-rich/G4 motif located on the lagging strand template for DNA replication and supports Pif1 function, DNA replication and genome integrity.
© The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.
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14 MeSH Terms
ETAA1 acts at stalled replication forks to maintain genome integrity.
Bass TE, Luzwick JW, Kavanaugh G, Carroll C, Dungrawala H, Glick GG, Feldkamp MD, Putney R, Chazin WJ, Cortez D
(2016) Nat Cell Biol 18: 1185-1195
MeSH Terms: Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing, Antigens, Surface, Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated Proteins, Carrier Proteins, Cell Cycle Proteins, Cell Line, DNA Damage, DNA Replication, DNA-Binding Proteins, Genome, Human, Genomic Instability, Humans, Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases, Proteomics, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added April 18, 2017
The ATR checkpoint kinase coordinates cellular responses to DNA replication stress. Budding yeast contain three activators of Mec1 (the ATR orthologue); however, only TOPBP1 is known to activate ATR in vertebrates. We identified ETAA1 as a replication stress response protein in two proteomic screens. ETAA1-deficient cells accumulate double-strand breaks, sister chromatid exchanges, and other hallmarks of genome instability. They are also hypersensitive to replication stress and have increased frequencies of replication fork collapse. ETAA1 contains two RPA-interaction motifs that localize ETAA1 to stalled replication forks. It also interacts with several DNA damage response proteins including the BLM/TOP3α/RMI1/RMI2 and ATR/ATRIP complexes. It binds ATR/ATRIP directly using a motif with sequence similarity to the TOPBP1 ATR-activation domain; and like TOPBP1, ETAA1 acts as a direct ATR activator. ETAA1 functions in parallel to the TOPBP1/RAD9/HUS1/RAD1 pathway to regulate ATR and maintain genome stability. Thus, vertebrate cells contain at least two ATR-activating proteins.
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15 MeSH Terms
Pfh1 Is an Accessory Replicative Helicase that Interacts with the Replisome to Facilitate Fork Progression and Preserve Genome Integrity.
McDonald KR, Guise AJ, Pourbozorgi-Langroudi P, Cristea IM, Zakian VA, Capra JA, Sabouri N
(2016) PLoS Genet 12: e1006238
MeSH Terms: Binding Sites, DNA Helicases, DNA Replication, DNA-Directed DNA Polymerase, Genomic Instability, Multienzyme Complexes, Protein Binding, S Phase, Schizosaccharomyces, Schizosaccharomyces pombe Proteins
Show Abstract · Added April 18, 2017
Replicative DNA helicases expose the two strands of the double helix to the replication apparatus, but accessory helicases are often needed to help forks move past naturally occurring hard-to-replicate sites, such as tightly bound proteins, RNA/DNA hybrids, and DNA secondary structures. Although the Schizosaccharomyces pombe 5'-to-3' DNA helicase Pfh1 is known to promote fork progression, its genomic targets, dynamics, and mechanisms of action are largely unknown. Here we address these questions by integrating genome-wide identification of Pfh1 binding sites, comprehensive analysis of the effects of Pfh1 depletion on replication and DNA damage, and proteomic analysis of Pfh1 interaction partners by immunoaffinity purification mass spectrometry. Of the 621 high confidence Pfh1-binding sites in wild type cells, about 40% were sites of fork slowing (as marked by high DNA polymerase occupancy) and/or DNA damage (as marked by high levels of phosphorylated H2A). The replication and integrity of tRNA and 5S rRNA genes, highly transcribed RNA polymerase II genes, and nucleosome depleted regions were particularly Pfh1-dependent. The association of Pfh1 with genomic integrity at highly transcribed genes was S phase dependent, and thus unlikely to be an artifact of high transcription rates. Although Pfh1 affected replication and suppressed DNA damage at discrete sites throughout the genome, Pfh1 and the replicative DNA polymerase bound to similar extents to both Pfh1-dependent and independent sites, suggesting that Pfh1 is proximal to the replication machinery during S phase. Consistent with this interpretation, Pfh1 co-purified with many key replisome components, including the hexameric MCM helicase, replicative DNA polymerases, RPA, and the processivity clamp PCNA in an S phase dependent manner. Thus, we conclude that Pfh1 is an accessory DNA helicase that interacts with the replisome and promotes replication and suppresses DNA damage at hard-to-replicate sites. These data provide insight into mechanisms by which this evolutionarily conserved helicase helps preserve genome integrity.
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10 MeSH Terms
Genomic Instability Associated with p53 Knockdown in the Generation of Huntington's Disease Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.
Tidball AM, Neely MD, Chamberlin R, Aboud AA, Kumar KK, Han B, Bryan MR, Aschner M, Ess KC, Bowman AB
(2016) PLoS One 11: e0150372
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Cells, Cultured, DNA Damage, Gene Knockdown Techniques, Genomic Instability, Humans, Huntington Disease, Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells, Karyotyping, Middle Aged, Nucleic Acid Synthesis Inhibitors, Signal Transduction, Tumor Suppressor Protein p53, Young Adult, Zinostatin
Show Abstract · Added August 18, 2016
Alterations in DNA damage response and repair have been observed in Huntington's disease (HD). We generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) from primary dermal fibroblasts of 5 patients with HD and 5 control subjects. A significant fraction of the HD iPSC lines had genomic abnormalities as assessed by karyotype analysis, while none of our control lines had detectable genomic abnormalities. We demonstrate a statistically significant increase in genomic instability in HD cells during reprogramming. We also report a significant association with repeat length and severity of this instability. Our karyotypically normal HD iPSCs also have elevated ATM-p53 signaling as shown by elevated levels of phosphorylated p53 and H2AX, indicating either elevated DNA damage or hypersensitive DNA damage signaling in HD iPSCs. Thus, increased DNA damage responses in the HD genotype is coincidental with the observed chromosomal aberrations. We conclude that the disease causing mutation in HD increases the propensity of chromosomal instability relative to control fibroblasts specifically during reprogramming to a pluripotent state by a commonly used episomal-based method that includes p53 knockdown.
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2 Members
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16 MeSH Terms
A whole genome RNAi screen identifies replication stress response genes.
Kavanaugh G, Ye F, Mohni KN, Luzwick JW, Glick G, Cortez D
(2015) DNA Repair (Amst) 35: 55-62
MeSH Terms: Cell Line, Tumor, Checkpoint Kinase 1, DNA Damage, DNA Repair, DNA Replication, DNA, Single-Stranded, Genome, Human, Genomic Instability, Genomics, Humans, Microscopy, Fluorescence, Protein Kinases, RNA Interference, RNA, Small Interfering
Show Abstract · Added February 4, 2016
Proper DNA replication is critical to maintain genome stability. When the DNA replication machinery encounters obstacles to replication, replication forks stall and the replication stress response is activated. This response includes activation of cell cycle checkpoints, stabilization of the replication fork, and DNA damage repair and tolerance mechanisms. Defects in the replication stress response can result in alterations to the DNA sequence causing changes in protein function and expression, ultimately leading to disease states such as cancer. To identify additional genes that control the replication stress response, we performed a three-parameter, high content, whole genome siRNA screen measuring DNA replication before and after a challenge with replication stress as well as a marker of checkpoint kinase signalling. We identified over 200 replication stress response genes and subsequently analyzed how they influence cellular viability in response to replication stress. These data will serve as a useful resource for understanding the replication stress response.
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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1 Members
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14 MeSH Terms
Selenoprotein P influences colitis-induced tumorigenesis by mediating stemness and oxidative damage.
Barrett CW, Reddy VK, Short SP, Motley AK, Lintel MK, Bradley AM, Freeman T, Vallance J, Ning W, Parang B, Poindexter SV, Fingleton B, Chen X, Washington MK, Wilson KT, Shroyer NF, Hill KE, Burk RF, Williams CS
(2015) J Clin Invest 125: 2646-60
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antioxidants, Apoptosis, Colitis, Colonic Neoplasms, DNA Damage, Genomic Instability, Haploinsufficiency, Macrophages, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Mutagenesis, Site-Directed, Neoplastic Stem Cells, Oxidative Stress, Protein Structure, Tertiary, Selenium, Selenoprotein P, Tumor Microenvironment, Tumor Suppressor Proteins
Show Abstract · Added July 10, 2015
Patients with inflammatory bowel disease are at increased risk for colon cancer due to augmented oxidative stress. These patients also have compromised antioxidant defenses as the result of nutritional deficiencies. The micronutrient selenium is essential for selenoprotein production and is transported from the liver to target tissues via selenoprotein P (SEPP1). Target tissues also produce SEPP1, which is thought to possess an endogenous antioxidant function. Here, we have shown that mice with Sepp1 haploinsufficiency or mutations that disrupt either the selenium transport or the enzymatic domain of SEPP1 exhibit increased colitis-associated carcinogenesis as the result of increased genomic instability and promotion of a protumorigenic microenvironment. Reduced SEPP1 function markedly increased M2-polarized macrophages, indicating a role for SEPP1 in macrophage polarization and immune function. Furthermore, compared with partial loss, complete loss of SEPP1 substantially reduced tumor burden, in part due to increased apoptosis. Using intestinal organoid cultures, we found that, compared with those from WT animals, Sepp1-null cultures display increased stem cell characteristics that are coupled with increased ROS production, DNA damage, proliferation, decreased cell survival, and modulation of WNT signaling in response to H2O2-mediated oxidative stress. Together, these data demonstrate that SEPP1 influences inflammatory tumorigenesis by affecting genomic stability, the inflammatory microenvironment, and epithelial stem cell functions.
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6 Members
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20 MeSH Terms
Cloning and variation of ground state intestinal stem cells.
Wang X, Yamamoto Y, Wilson LH, Zhang T, Howitt BE, Farrow MA, Kern F, Ning G, Hong Y, Khor CC, Chevalier B, Bertrand D, Wu L, Nagarajan N, Sylvester FA, Hyams JS, Devers T, Bronson R, Lacy DB, Ho KY, Crum CP, McKeon F, Xian W
(2015) Nature 522: 173-8
MeSH Terms: Bacterial Toxins, Cell Differentiation, Cell Lineage, Cells, Cultured, Clone Cells, Clostridium difficile, Colon, Enterocolitis, Pseudomembranous, Epigenesis, Genetic, Epithelium, Fetus, Genomic Instability, Humans, Intestine, Small, Intestines, Organoids, Stem Cells
Show Abstract · Added September 28, 2015
Stem cells of the gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, liver and other columnar epithelia collectively resist cloning in their elemental states. Here we demonstrate the cloning and propagation of highly clonogenic, 'ground state' stem cells of the human intestine and colon. We show that derived stem-cell pedigrees sustain limited copy number and sequence variation despite extensive serial passaging and display exquisitely precise, cell-autonomous commitment to epithelial differentiation consistent with their origins along the intestinal tract. This developmentally patterned and epigenetically maintained commitment of stem cells is likely to enforce the functional specificity of the adult intestinal tract. Using clonally derived colonic epithelia, we show that toxins A or B of the enteric pathogen Clostridium difficile recapitulate the salient features of pseudomembranous colitis. The stability of the epigenetic commitment programs of these stem cells, coupled with their unlimited replicative expansion and maintained clonogenicity, suggests certain advantages for their use in disease modelling and regenerative medicine.
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1 Members
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17 MeSH Terms
Preventing replication fork collapse to maintain genome integrity.
Cortez D
(2015) DNA Repair (Amst) 32: 149-157
MeSH Terms: Animals, DNA, DNA Damage, DNA Polymerase III, DNA Repair, DNA Replication, Gene Expression Regulation, Genomic Instability, Humans, Mice, Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Xenopus laevis
Show Abstract · Added February 4, 2016
Billions of base pairs of DNA must be replicated trillions of times in a human lifetime. Complete and accurate replication once and only once per cell division cycle is essential to maintain genome integrity and prevent disease. Impediments to replication fork progression including difficult to replicate DNA sequences, conflicts with transcription, and DNA damage further add to the genome maintenance challenge. These obstacles frequently cause fork stalling, but only rarely cause a failure to complete replication. Robust mechanisms ensure that stalled forks remain stable and capable of either resuming DNA synthesis or being rescued by converging forks. However, when failures do happen the fork collapses leading to genome rearrangements, cell death and disease. Despite intense interest, the mechanisms to repair damaged replication forks, stabilize them, and ensure successful replication remain only partly understood. Different models of fork collapse have been proposed with varying descriptions of what happens to the DNA and replisome. Here, I will define fork collapse and describe what is known about how the replication checkpoint prevents it to maintain genome stability.
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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13 MeSH Terms
Life after MOMP.
Gama V, Deshmukh M
(2015) Mol Cell 58: 199-201
MeSH Terms: Animals, Apoptosis, DNA Damage, Genomic Instability, Humans, Mitochondrial Membranes
Show Abstract · Added October 26, 2015
In this and a recent issue of Molecular Cell, Liu et al. (2015) and Ichim et al. (2015) report that low levels of caspase activity triggered by limited mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP) promote genomic instability that drives tumorigenesis, providing a novel and unexpected link between these effectors of apoptosis and cancer initiation.
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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6 MeSH Terms