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Results: 1 to 9 of 9

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Mining Twitter as a First Step toward Assessing the Adequacy of Gender Identification Terms on Intake Forms.
Hicks A, Hogan WR, Rutherford M, Malin B, Xie M, Fellbaum C, Yin Z, Fabbri D, Hanna J, Bian J
(2015) AMIA Annu Symp Proc 2015: 611-20
MeSH Terms: Data Mining, Female, Gender Identity, Humans, Language, Male, Sexual and Gender Minorities, Social Media, Transgender Persons
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2018
The Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommends that health care providers collect data on gender identity. If these data are to be useful, they should utilize terms that characterize gender identity in a manner that is 1) sensitive to transgender and gender non-binary individuals (trans* people) and 2) semantically structured to render associated data meaningful to the health care professionals. We developed a set of tools and approaches for analyzing Twitter data as a basis for generating hypotheses on language used to identify gender and discuss gender-related issues across regions and population groups. We offer sample hypotheses regarding regional variations in the usage of certain terms such as 'genderqueer', 'genderfluid', and 'neutrois' and their usefulness as terms on intake forms. While these hypotheses cannot be directly validated with Twitter data alone, our data and tools help to formulate testable hypotheses and design future studies regarding the adequacy of gender identification terms on intake forms.
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MeSH Terms
An intersectional approach to social determinants of stress for African American men: men's and women's perspectives.
Griffith DM, Ellis KR, Allen JO
(2013) Am J Mens Health 7: 19S-30S
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Female, Focus Groups, Gender Identity, Health Status, Humans, Interpersonal Relations, Male, Men's Health, Middle Aged, Perception, Socioeconomic Factors, Stress, Psychological, United States, Workplace
Show Abstract · Added March 7, 2014
Stress is a key factor that helps explain racial and gender differences in health, but few studies have examined gendered stressors that affect men. This study uses an intersectional approach to examine the sources of stress in African American men's lives from the perspectives of African American men and important women in their lives. Phenomenological analysis was used to examine data from 18 exploratory focus groups with 150 African American men, ages 30 years and older, and eight groups with 77 African American women. The two primary sources of stress identified were seeking to fulfill socially and culturally important gender roles and being an African American man in a racially stratified society. A central focus of African American men's daily lives was trying to navigate chronic stressors at home and at work and a lack of time to fulfill roles and responsibilities in different life domains that are traditionally the responsibility of men. Health was rarely mentioned by men as a source of stress, though women noted that men's aging and weathering bodies were a source of stress for men. Because of the intersection of racism and economic and social stressors, men and women reported that the stress that African American men experienced was shaped by the intersection of race, ethnicity, age, marital status, and other factors that combined in unique ways. The intersection of these identities and characteristics led to stressors that were perceived to be of greater quantity and qualitatively different than the stress experienced by men of other races.
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17 MeSH Terms
"She looks out for the meals, period": African American men's perceptions of how their wives influence their eating behavior and dietary health.
Allen JO, Griffith DM, Gaines HC
(2013) Health Psychol 32: 447-55
MeSH Terms: African Americans, Aged, Diet, Female, Focus Groups, Food Preferences, Gender Identity, Humans, Interpersonal Relations, Male, Meals, Men's Health, Michigan, Middle Aged, Spouses
Show Abstract · Added March 27, 2014
OBJECTIVE - Women play a critical role in men's dietary health, but how men think about the nature and mechanisms of their wives' influence on their eating behavior is not well understood. This study examined how African American men described the roles their wives played in shaping their eating behavior.
METHODS - Thematic content analysis was used to analyze data from nine exploratory focus groups conducted with a convenience sample of 83 African American men who were middle aged or older and lived in southeast Michigan.
RESULTS - Men perceived having more freedom to choose what they ate while eating out, even when accompanied by their wives, compared with at home. The men indicated their wives influenced what they ate at home more than their own preferences. They described traditional gendered food roles at home and were satisfied that their wives played a dominant role in household food preparation and decision making. Men had mixed feelings about wives' efforts to prepare healthier meals. While they appreciated that their wives cared about their health, the men felt they were rarely consulted on how meals could be healthier and often disliked the healthy changes their wives made. The men prioritized keeping their wives happy, preserving spousal division of roles, and maintaining marital harmony over participating in food decision making or expressing their personal food preferences.
CONCLUSIONS - Interventions to improve married African American men's eating behaviors need to explicitly consider that men may prioritize marital harmony and the preservation of spousal food roles over their tastes, preferences, and desired food decision making roles.
2013 APA, all rights reserved
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15 MeSH Terms
Measuring masculinity in research on men of color: findings and future directions.
Griffith DM, Gunter K, Watkins DC
(2012) Am J Public Health 102 Suppl 2: S187-94
MeSH Terms: African Americans, Attitude to Health, Cultural Characteristics, Gender Identity, Health Behavior, Humans, Male, Masculinity, Men's Health, Mental Health, Social Values, Socioeconomic Factors, United States
Show Abstract · Added March 27, 2014
The purpose of this study was to examine the association between masculinity and the health of US men of color aged 18 years and older. We identified 22 population-based studies that included a measure of masculinity and a measure of health behavior, mental health, or physical health. The associations between masculinity and health were complex and varied by construct and health outcome, though they generally were significant in the hypothesized directions. Future research should explore the centrality of masculinity versus other identities and characteristics, how the relationship between masculinity and health varies by health outcome, and the identification of the conceptions and aspects of masculinity that are most relevant to and associated with specific health behaviors and health outcomes.
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13 MeSH Terms
Male gender role strain as a barrier to African American men's physical activity.
Griffith DM, Gunter K, Allen JO
(2011) Health Educ Behav 38: 482-91
MeSH Terms: Adult, African Americans, Aged, Employment, Family Relations, Focus Groups, Gender Identity, Health Behavior, Humans, Male, Michigan, Middle Aged, Motor Activity, Qualitative Research, Socioeconomic Factors, Time Factors, Urban Population
Show Abstract · Added March 27, 2014
Despite the potential health consequences, African American men tend to treat their roles as providers, fathers, spouses, and community members as more important than engaging in health behaviors such as physical activity. We conducted 14 exploratory focus groups with 105 urban, middle-aged African American men from the Midwest to examine factors that influence their health behaviors. Thematic content analysis revealed three interrelated barriers to physical activity: (a) work, family, and community commitments and priorities limited time and motivation for engaging in physical activity; (b) physical activity was not a normative individual or social activity and contributed to men prioritizing work and family responsibilities over physical activity; and (c) the effort men exerted in seeking to fulfill the provider role limited their motivation and energy to engage in physical activity. These findings highlight the need for physical activity interventions that consider how health fits in the overall context of men's lives.
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17 MeSH Terms
Work preferences, life values, and personal views of top math/science graduate students and the profoundly gifted: Developmental changes and gender differences during emerging adulthood and parenthood.
Ferriman K, Lubinski D, Benbow CP
(2009) J Pers Soc Psychol 97: 517-32
MeSH Terms: Achievement, Adolescent, Adult, Career Choice, Career Mobility, Child, Gifted, Choice Behavior, Culture, Education, Graduate, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Gender Identity, Humans, Life Style, Male, Mathematics, Parents, School Admission Criteria, Science, Social Values, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2018
Work preferences, life values, and personal views of top math/science graduate students (275 men, 255 women) were assessed at ages 25 and 35 years. In Study 1, analyses of work preferences revealed developmental changes and gender differences in priorities: Some gender differences increased over time and increased more among parents than among childless participants, seemingly because the mothers' priorities changed. In Study 2, gender differences in the graduate students' life values and personal views at age 35 were compared with those of profoundly gifted participants (top 1 in 10,000, identified by age 13 and tracked for 20 years: 265 men, 84 women). Again, gender differences were larger among parents. Across both cohorts, men appeared to assume a more agentic, career-focused perspective than women did, placing more importance on creating high-impact products, receiving compensation, taking risks, and gaining recognition as the best in their fields. Women appeared to favor a more communal, holistic perspective, emphasizing community, family, friendships, and less time devoted to career. Gender differences in life priorities, which intensify during parenthood, anticipated differential male-female representation in high-level and time-intensive careers, even among talented men and women with similar profiles of abilities, vocational interests, and educational experiences.
(c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved).
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Sex differences in mathematical reasoning ability at age 13: their status 20 years later.
Benbow CP, Lubinski D, Shea DL, Eftekhari-Sanjani H
(2000) Psychol Sci 11: 474-80
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aptitude, Career Choice, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Gender Identity, Humans, Male, Mathematics, Problem Solving
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2018
Reported is the 20-year follow-up of 1,975 mathematically gifted adolescents (top 1%) whose assessments at age 12 to 14 revealed robust gender differences in mathematical reasoning ability. Both sexes became exceptional achievers and perceived themselves as such; they reported uniformly high levels of degree attainment and satisfaction with both their career direction and their overall success. The earlier sex differences in mathematical reasoning ability did predict differential educational and occupational outcomes. The observed differences also appeared to be a function of sex differences in preferences for (a) inorganic versus organic disciplines and (b) a career-focused versus more-balanced life. Because profile differences in abilities and preferences are longitudinally stable, males probably will remain more represented in some disciplines, whereas females are likely to remain more represented in others. These data have policy implications for higher education and the world of work.
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Biological correlates of high mathematical reasoning ability.
Benbow CP, Benbow RM
(1984) Prog Brain Res 61: 469-90
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Aging, Androgens, Attitude, Child, Child, Gifted, Education, Environment, Estrogens, Female, Functional Laterality, Gender Identity, Genetics, Humans, Immune System Diseases, Intelligence Tests, Male, Mathematics, Mental Processes, Models, Biological, Sex Characteristics, Sex Chromosomes, Socialization, Space Perception
Added April 10, 2018
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Gender effects on blood pressures obtained during an on-campus screening.
McCubbin JA, Wilson JF, Bruehl S, Brady M, Clark K, Kort E
(1991) Psychosom Med 53: 90-100
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Arousal, Blood Pressure, Female, Gender Identity, Humans, Hypertension, Male, Mass Screening, Social Environment
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
In a blood pressure screening of 167 male and female college students, we varied the gender of the screener to evaluate gender effects on blood pressure. Four repeated determinations of resting systolic and diastolic blood pressure were obtained with an automated oscillometric device in a quiet semi-darkened room. Analysis of systolic blood pressure indicated a significant interaction between screener gender, subject gender, and repeated determinations. Screener/subject gender concordance produced relatively stable systolic blood pressures across four repeated determinations. Gender discordance resulted in larger changes in systolic pressures across the four determinations. This pattern was not obtained with diastolic pressures. Measures of recent stress and somatic anxiety interacted with gender effects on blood pressure. These gender effects on systolic blood pressure may explain, in part, higher reported incidence of "white coat hypertension" in females.
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11 MeSH Terms