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Brain atrophy in long-term abstinent alcoholics who demonstrate impairment on a simulated gambling task.
Fein G, Landman B, Tran H, McGillivray S, Finn P, Barakos J, Moon K
(2006) Neuroimage 32: 1465-71
MeSH Terms: Adult, Alcoholism, Amygdala, Atrophy, Brain, Brain Mapping, Data Interpretation, Statistical, Female, Gambling, Humans, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Psychomotor Performance, Temperance
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2014
We recently demonstrated impairment on the Simulated Gambling Task (SGT) in long-term abstinent alcoholics (AbsAlc). Brain regions that have been shown to be necessary for intact SGT performance are the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) and the amygdala; patients with VMPFC or amygdalar damage demonstrate SGT impairments similar to those of substance abusing populations. We examined these brain regions, using T1-weighted MRIs, in the 101 participants from our previous study using voxel-based morphometry (VBM). VBM was performed using a modification we developed [Fein, G., Landman, B., Tran, H., Barakos, J., Moon, K., Di Sclafani, V., Shumway, R., 2006. Statistical parametric mapping of brain morphology: sensitivity is dramatically increased by using brain-extracted images as inputs. Neuroimage] of Baron's procedure, [], in which we use skull-stripped images as input. We also restricted the analysis to a ROI consisting of the amygdala and VMPFC as defined by the Talairach Daemon resource. Compared to the controls, the AbsAlc participants had significant foci of reduced gray matter density within the amygdala. Thus, SGT decision-making deficits are associated with reduced gray matter in the amygdala, a brain region previously implicated in similar decision-making impairments in neurological samples. This structurally based abnormality may be the result of long-term alcohol abuse or dependence, or it may reflect a pre-existing factor that predisposes one to severe alcoholism. From an image analysis perspective, this work demonstrates the increased sensitivity that results from using skull-stripped inputs and from restricting the analysis to a ROI. Without both of these methodological advances, no statistically significant finding would have been forthcoming from this work.
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16 MeSH Terms
An FMRI Stroop task study of ventromedial prefrontal cortical function in pathological gamblers.
Potenza MN, Leung HC, Blumberg HP, Peterson BS, Fulbright RK, Lacadie CM, Skudlarski P, Gore JC
(2003) Am J Psychiatry 160: 1990-4
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Attention, Disruptive, Impulse Control, and Conduct Disorders, Frontal Lobe, Gambling, Gyrus Cinguli, Humans, Inhibition, Psychological, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Neural Pathways, Neuropsychological Tests, Prefrontal Cortex
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
OBJECTIVE - Function of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex has been implicated in impulse control. The authors used the Stroop paradigm to test attention and response inhibition during the presentation of congruent and incongruent stimuli in male pathological gamblers and a group of comparison subjects.
METHOD - Event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to examine ventromedial prefrontal cortex function during Stroop performance.
RESULTS - In response to infrequent incongruent stimuli, pathological gamblers demonstrated decreased activity in the left ventromedial prefrontal cortex relative to the comparison subjects. Both groups demonstrated similar activity changes in multiple brain regions, including activation of the dorsal anterior cingulate and dorsolateral frontal cortex.
CONCLUSIONS - Pathological gamblers share many neural correlates of Stroop task performance with healthy subjects but differ in a brain region previously implicated in disorders characterized by poor impulse control.
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16 MeSH Terms
Gambling urges in pathological gambling: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.
Potenza MN, Steinberg MA, Skudlarski P, Fulbright RK, Lacadie CM, Wilber MK, Rounsaville BJ, Gore JC, Wexler BE
(2003) Arch Gen Psychiatry 60: 828-36
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Arousal, Brain, Brain Mapping, Disruptive, Impulse Control, and Conduct Disorders, Echo-Planar Imaging, Emotions, Gambling, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Middle Aged, Motivation, Personality Inventory, Psychometrics, Reference Values
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
BACKGROUND - Gambling urges in pathological gambling (PG) often immediately precede engagement in self-destructive gambling behavior. An improved understanding of the neural correlates of gambling urges in PG would advance our understanding of the brain mechanisms underlying PG and would help direct research into effective treatments.
METHODS - Echoplanar functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess brain function during viewing of videotaped scenarios with gambling, happy, or sad content. Participants rated the quality and magnitude of their emotional and motivational responses.
RESULTS - Men with PG (n = 10) reported mean +/- SD greater gambling urges after viewing gambling scenarios vs control subjects (n = 11) (5.20 +/- 3.43 vs 0.32 +/- 0.60; chi21,19 = 21.71; P<.001). The groups did not differ significantly in their subjective responses to the happy (P =.56) or sad (P =.81) videotapes. The most pronounced between-group differences in neural activities were observed during the initial period of viewing of the gambling scenarios: PG subjects displayed relatively decreased activity in frontal and orbitofrontal cortex, caudate/basal ganglia, and thalamus compared with controls. Distinct patterns of regional brain activity were observed in specific temporal epochs of videotape viewing. For example, differences localized to the ventral anterior cingulate during the final period of gambling videotape viewing, corresponding to the presentation of the most provocative gambling stimuli. Although group differences in brain activity were observed during viewing of the sad and happy scenarios, they were distinct from those corresponding to the gambling scenarios.
CONCLUSIONS - In men with PG, gambling cue presentation elicits gambling urges and leads to a temporally dynamic pattern of brain activity changes in frontal, paralimbic, and limbic brain structures. When viewing gambling cues, PG subjects demonstrate relatively decreased activity in brain regions implicated in impulse regulation compared with controls.
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17 MeSH Terms
Performance styles as a determinant of effectiveness in an information-seeking task.
Wallston KA
(1972) J Pers 40: 211-25
MeSH Terms: Attitude, Ethics, Gambling, Humans, Interpersonal Relations, Judgment, Male, Motivation, Personality, Probability, Problem Solving, Psychodrama, Psychological Tests, Self Concept, Social Behavior, Task Performance and Analysis
Added July 28, 2015
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1 Members
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16 MeSH Terms