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G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 (GRK2) and 5 (GRK5) Exhibit Selective Phosphorylation of the Neurotensin Receptor in Vitro.
Inagaki S, Ghirlando R, Vishnivetskiy SA, Homan KT, White JF, Tesmer JJ, Gurevich VV, Grisshammer R
(2015) Biochemistry 54: 4320-9
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Animals, Cattle, G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2, G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 5, Humans, Models, Molecular, Molecular Sequence Data, Phosphorylation, Rats, Receptors, Neurotensin
Show Abstract · Added February 15, 2016
G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) play an important role in the desensitization of G protein-mediated signaling of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The level of interest in mapping their phosphorylation sites has increased because recent studies suggest that the differential pattern of receptor phosphorylation has distinct biological consequences. In vitro phosphorylation experiments using well-controlled systems are useful for deciphering the complexity of these physiological reactions and understanding the targeted event. Here, we report on the phosphorylation of the class A GPCR neurotensin receptor 1 (NTSR1) by GRKs under defined experimental conditions afforded by nanodisc technology. Phosphorylation of NTSR1 by GRK2 was agonist-dependent, whereas phosphorylation by GRK5 occurred in an activation-independent manner. In addition, the negatively charged lipids in the immediate vicinity of NTSR1 directly affect phosphorylation by GRKs. Identification of phosphorylation sites in agonist-activated NTSR1 revealed that GRK2 and GRK5 target different residues located on the intracellular receptor elements. GRK2 phosphorylates only the C-terminal Ser residues, whereas GRK5 phosphorylates Ser and Thr residues located in intracellular loop 3 and the C-terminus. Interestingly, phosphorylation assays using a series of NTSR1 mutants show that GRK2 does not require acidic residues upstream of the phospho-acceptors for site-specific phosphorylation, in contrast to the β2-adrenergic and μ-opioid receptors. Differential phosphorylation of GPCRs by GRKs is thought to encode a particular signaling outcome, and our in vitro study revealed NTSR1 differential phosphorylation by GRK2 and GRK5.
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11 MeSH Terms
Multiple mechanistically distinct modes of endocannabinoid mobilization at central amygdala glutamatergic synapses.
Ramikie TS, Nyilas R, Bluett RJ, Gamble-George JC, Hartley ND, Mackie K, Watanabe M, Katona I, Patel S
(2014) Neuron 81: 1111-1125
MeSH Terms: Amygdala, Animals, Calcium, Endocannabinoids, Excitatory Postsynaptic Potentials, G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2, GTP-Binding Protein alpha Subunits, Gq-G11, Glutamic Acid, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred ICR, Neurons, Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases, Receptor, Cannabinoid, CB1, Receptors, Muscarinic, Signal Transduction, Synapses, Synaptic Transmission
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
The central amygdala (CeA) is a key structure at the limbic-motor interface regulating stress responses and emotional learning. Endocannabinoid (eCB) signaling is heavily implicated in the regulation of stress-response physiology and emotional learning processes; however, the role of eCBs in the modulation of synaptic efficacy in the CeA is not well understood. Here we describe the subcellular localization of CB1 cannabinoid receptors and eCB synthetic machinery at glutamatergic synapses in the CeA and find that CeA neurons exhibit multiple mechanistically and temporally distinct modes of postsynaptic eCB mobilization. These data identify a prominent role for eCBs in the modulation of excitatory drive to CeA neurons and provide insight into the mechanisms by which eCB signaling and exogenous cannabinoids could regulate stress responses and emotional learning.
Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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18 MeSH Terms
The chemokine receptors CXCR1 and CXCR2 couple to distinct G protein-coupled receptor kinases to mediate and regulate leukocyte functions.
Raghuwanshi SK, Su Y, Singh V, Haynes K, Richmond A, Richardson RM
(2012) J Immunol 189: 2824-32
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Line, Tumor, Exocytosis, Female, G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2, G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinases, Humans, Interleukin-8, Leukemia, Basophilic, Acute, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Neovascularization, Physiologic, Neutrophils, Phosphorylation, Rats, Receptors, Interleukin-8A, Receptors, Interleukin-8B, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added May 31, 2013
The chemokine receptors, CXCR1 and CXCR2, couple to Gαi to induce leukocyte recruitment and activation at sites of inflammation. Upon activation by CXCL8, these receptors become phosphorylated, desensitized, and internalized. In this study, we investigated the role of different G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) in CXCR1- and CXCR2-mediated cellular functions. To that end, short hairpin RNA was used to inhibit GRK2, 3, 5, and 6 in RBL-2H3 cells stably expressing CXCR1 or CXCR2, and CXCL8-mediated receptor activation and regulation were assessed. Inhibition of GRK2 and GRK6 increased CXCR1 and CXCR2 resistance to phosphorylation, desensitization, and internalization, respectively, and enhanced CXCL8-induced phosphoinositide hydrolysis and exocytosis in vitro. GRK2 depletion diminished CXCR1-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation but had no effect on CXCR2-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation. GRK6 depletion had no significant effect on CXCR1 function. However, peritoneal neutrophils from mice deficient in GRK6 (GRK6(-/-)) displayed an increase in CXCR2-mediated G protein activation but in vitro exhibited a decrease in chemotaxis, receptor desensitization, and internalization relative to wild-type (GRK6(+/+)) cells. In contrast, neutrophil recruitment in vivo in GRK6(-/-) mice was increased in response to delivery of CXCL1 through the air pouch model. In a wound-closure assay, GRK6(-/-) mice showed enhanced myeloperoxidase activity, suggesting enhanced neutrophil recruitment, and faster wound closure compared with GRK6(+/+) animals. Taken together, the results indicate that CXCR1 and CXCR2 couple to distinct GRK isoforms to mediate and regulate inflammatory responses. CXCR1 predominantly couples to GRK2, whereas CXCR2 interacts with GRK6 to negatively regulate receptor sensitization and trafficking, thus affecting cell signaling and angiogenesis.
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20 MeSH Terms
Reduced expression of G protein-coupled receptor kinases in schizophrenia but not in schizoaffective disorder.
Bychkov ER, Ahmed MR, Gurevich VV, Benovic JL, Gurevich EV
(2011) Neurobiol Dis 44: 248-58
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Arrestins, Cohort Studies, Female, G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2, G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 3, G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 5, G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinases, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Prefrontal Cortex, Psychotic Disorders, Schizophrenia, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Alterations of multiple G protein-mediated signaling pathways are detected in schizophrenia. G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) and arrestins terminate signaling by G protein-coupled receptors exerting a powerful influence on receptor functions. Modifications of arrestin and/or GRKs expression may contribute to schizophrenia pathology. Cortical expression of arrestins and GRKs was measured postmortem in control and subjects with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. Additionally, arrestin/GRK expression was determined in elderly patients with schizophrenia and age-matched control. Patients with schizophrenia, but not schizoaffective disorder, displayed a reduced concentration of arrestin and GRK mRNAs and GRK3 protein. Arrestins and GRK significantly decreased with age. In elderly patients, GRK6 was reduced, with other GRKs and arrestins unchanged. A reduced cortical concentration of GRKs in schizophrenia (resembling that in aging) may result in altered G protein-dependent signaling, thus contributing to prefrontal deficits in schizophrenia. The data suggest distinct molecular mechanisms underlying schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder.
Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.
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17 MeSH Terms
Haloperidol and clozapine differentially affect the expression of arrestins, receptor kinases, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation.
Ahmed MR, Gurevich VV, Dalby KN, Benovic JL, Gurevich EV
(2008) J Pharmacol Exp Ther 325: 276-83
MeSH Terms: Animals, Arrestins, Brain, Brain Chemistry, Clozapine, Cryoultramicrotomy, Enzyme Activation, Extracellular Signal-Regulated MAP Kinases, G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2, G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 3, G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 5, G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinases, Gene Expression, Haloperidol, Male, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Dopamine and other G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent the major target of antipsychotic drugs. GPCRs undergo desensitization via activation-dependent phosphorylation by G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) followed by arrestin binding. Arrestins and GRKs are major regulators of GPCR signaling. We elucidated changes in expression of two arrestins and four GRKs following chronic (21 days) treatment with haloperidol (1 mg/kg i.p.) or clozapine (20 mg/kg i.p.) 2 or 24 h after the last injection in 11 brain regions. Haloperidol decreased GRK3 in ventrolateral caudate-putamen and transiently down-regulated GRK5 in globus pallidus and caudal caudate-putamen. Clozapine also caused a short-term suppression of the GRK5 expression in the caudal caudate-putamen and globus pallidus, but, unlike haloperidol, elevated GRK5 in the caudal caudate-putamen after 24 h. Unlike haloperidol, clozapine decreased arrestin2 and GRK3 in hippocampus and GRK3 in globus pallidus but increased arrestin2 in the core of nucleus accumbens and ventrolateral caudate-putamen and GRK2 in prefrontal cortex. Clozapine, but not haloperidol, induced long-term activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 2 in ventrolateral caudate-putamen and transient in prefrontal cortex. The data demonstrate that haloperidol and clozapine differentially affect the expression of arrestins and GRKs and ERK activity, which may play a role in determining their clinical profile.
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17 MeSH Terms
Altered expression and subcellular distribution of GRK subtypes in the dopamine-depleted rat basal ganglia is not normalized by l-DOPA treatment.
Ahmed MR, Bychkov E, Gurevich VV, Benovic JL, Gurevich EV
(2008) J Neurochem 104: 1622-36
MeSH Terms: Animals, Arrestins, Basal Ganglia, Dopamine, Dopamine Agents, Dopamine Agonists, G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2, G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 3, G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 5, G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinases, Gene Expression, Levodopa, Medial Forebrain Bundle, Pergolide, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Substantia Nigra
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Dysregulation of dopamine (DA) receptors is believed to underlie Parkinson's disease pathology and l-DOPA-induced motor complications. DA receptors are subject to regulation by G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) and arrestins. DA lesion with 6-hydroxydopamine caused multiple protein- and brain region-specific changes in the expression of GRKs. In the globus pallidus, all four GRK isoforms (GRK2, 3, 5, 6) were reduced in the lesioned hemisphere. In the caudal caudate-putamen (cCPu) three GRK isoforms (GRK2, 3, 6) were decreased by DA depletion. The decrease in GRK proteins in globus pallidus, but not cCPu, was mirrored by reduction in mRNA. GRK3 protein was reduced in the rostral caudate-putamen (rCPu), whereas other isoforms were either unchanged or up-regulated. GRK6 protein and mRNA were up-regulated in rCPu and nucleus accumbens. l-DOPA (25 mg/kg, twice daily for 10 days) failed to reverse changes caused by DA depletion, whereas D(2)/D(3) agonist pergolide (0.25 mg/kg daily for 10 days) restored normal levels of expression of GRK5 and 6. In rCPu, GRK2 protein was increased in most subcellular fractions by l-DOPA but not by DA depletion alone. Similarly, l-DOPA up-regulated arrestin3 in membrane fractions in both regions. GRK5 was down-regulated by l-DOPA in cCPu in the light membrane fraction, where this isoform is the most abundant. The data suggest that alterations in the expression and subcellular distribution of arrestins and GRKs contribute to pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease. Thus, these proteins may be targets for antiparkinsonian therapy.
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17 MeSH Terms