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Thrombotic microangiopathy as a cause of cardiovascular toxicity from the BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitor ponatinib.
Latifi Y, Moccetti F, Wu M, Xie A, Packwood W, Qi Y, Ozawa K, Shentu W, Brown E, Shirai T, McCarty OJ, Ruggeri Z, Moslehi J, Chen J, Druker BJ, López JA, Lindner JR
(2019) Blood 133: 1597-1606
MeSH Terms: Animals, Aorta, Cardiovascular Diseases, Endothelium, Fusion Proteins, bcr-abl, Humans, Imidazoles, Ischemia, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Platelet Adhesiveness, Protein Kinase Inhibitors, Pyridazines, Thrombotic Microangiopathies, Ventricular Dysfunction, von Willebrand Factor
Show Abstract · Added February 24, 2019
The third-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) ponatinib has been associated with high rates of acute ischemic events. The pathophysiology responsible for these events is unknown. We hypothesized that ponatinib produces an endothelial angiopathy involving excessive endothelial-associated von Willebrand factor (VWF) and secondary platelet adhesion. In wild-type mice and ApoE mice on a Western diet, ultrasound molecular imaging of the thoracic aorta for VWF A1-domain and glycoprotein-Ibα was performed to quantify endothelial-associated VWF and platelet adhesion. After treatment of wild-type mice for 7 days, aortic molecular signal for endothelial-associated VWF and platelet adhesion were five- to sixfold higher in ponatinib vs sham therapy ( < .001), whereas dasatinib had no effect. In ApoE mice, aortic VWF and platelet signals were two- to fourfold higher for ponatinib-treated compared with sham-treated mice ( < .05) and were significantly higher than in treated wild-type mice ( < .05). Platelet and VWF signals in ponatinib-treated mice were significantly reduced by -acetylcysteine and completely eliminated by recombinant ADAMTS13. Ponatinib produced segmental left ventricular wall motion abnormalities in 33% of wild-type and 45% of ApoE mice and corresponding patchy perfusion defects, yet coronary arteries were normal on angiography. Instead, a global microvascular angiopathy was detected by immunohistochemistry and by intravital microscopy observation of platelet aggregates and nets associated with endothelial cells and leukocytes. Our findings reveal a new form of vascular toxicity for the TKI ponatinib that involves VWF-mediated platelet adhesion and a secondary microvascular angiopathy that produces ischemic wall motion abnormalities. These processes can be mitigated by interventions known to reduce VWF multimer size.
© 2019 by The American Society of Hematology.
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16 MeSH Terms
Cardiovascular care of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) on tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy.
Barber MC, Mauro MJ, Moslehi J
(2017) Hematology Am Soc Hematol Educ Program 2017: 110-114
MeSH Terms: Aged, Dasatinib, Female, Fusion Proteins, bcr-abl, Humans, Hypertension, Pulmonary, Imidazoles, Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive, Male, Middle Aged, Protein Kinase Inhibitors, Pyridazines, Pyrimidines
Show Abstract · Added April 22, 2018
Cardiovascular (CV) health has emerged as an important consideration in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) because of improved prognosis. Indeed, the success of BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) has increased the focus on survivorship and late toxicity in oncological care. Survivorship issues in this population include CV disease prevention, given its prevalence in the general population. The introduction of BCR-ABL1 TKIs represented a unique concept of indefinite cancer therapy, only recently evolving to include "treatment-free remission." Importantly, later-generation BCR-ABL1 TKIs have been associated with CV complications. Dasatinib has been associated with pleural/pericardial effusions and pulmonary hypertension, whereas nilotinib and ponatinib have been linked to the development of vascular occlusive events. There is currently a dearth of data with respect to the mechanisms of drug toxicities, the subsets of patients at risk, and prevention and treatment strategies to mitigate CV complications in patients with CML. Nevertheless, optimal patient CV risk assessment needs to become a more central tenet of patient care in CML. We propose several practical considerations for the practicing oncologist relative to the CV health of patients with CML, especially those on chronic TKI therapy.
© 2016 by The American Society of Hematology. All rights reserved.
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13 MeSH Terms
Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor-Associated Cardiovascular Toxicity in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.
Moslehi JJ, Deininger M
(2015) J Clin Oncol 33: 4210-8
MeSH Terms: Aniline Compounds, Antineoplastic Agents, Cardiovascular System, Clinical Trials as Topic, Dasatinib, Fusion Proteins, bcr-abl, Humans, Hypertension, Imatinib Mesylate, Imidazoles, Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive, Molecular Targeted Therapy, Nitriles, Protein Kinase Inhibitors, Pyridazines, Pyrimidines, Quinolines
Show Abstract · Added March 6, 2016
For most patients with chronic myeloid leukemia, tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have turned a fatal disease into a manageable chronic condition. Imatinib, the first BCR-ABL1 TKI granted regulatory approval, has been surpassed in terms of molecular responses by the second-generation TKIs nilotinib, dasatinib, and bosutinib. Recently, ponatinib was approved as the only TKI with activity against the T315I mutation. Although all TKIs are associated with nonhematologic adverse events (AEs), experience with imatinib suggested that toxicities are typically manageable and apparent early during drug development. Recent reports of cardiovascular AEs with nilotinib and particularly ponatinib and of pulmonary arterial hypertension with dasatinib have raised concerns about long-term sequelae of drugs that may be administered for decades. Here, we review what is currently known about the cardiovascular toxicities of BCR-ABL1 TKIs, discuss potential mechanisms underlying cardiovascular AEs, and elucidate discrepancies between the reporting of such AEs between oncology and cardiovascular trials. Whenever possible, we provide practical recommendations, but we concede that cause-directed interventions will require better mechanistic understanding. We suggest that chronic myeloid leukemia heralds a fundamental shift in oncology toward effective but mostly noncurative long-term therapies. Realizing the full potential of these treatments will require a proactive rational approach to minimize long-term cardiovascular and cardiometabolic toxicities.
© 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.
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17 MeSH Terms
Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, Version 1.2014.
O'Brien S, Radich JP, Abboud CN, Akhtari M, Altman JK, Berman E, DeAngelo DJ, Deininger M, Devine S, Fathi AT, Gotlib J, Jagasia M, Kropf P, Moore JO, Pallera A, Pinilla-Ibarz J, Reddy VV, Shah NP, Smith BD, Snyder DS, Wetzler M, Gregory K, Sundar H, Ntational comprehensive cancer network
(2013) J Natl Compr Canc Netw 11: 1327-40
MeSH Terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Fusion Proteins, bcr-abl, Humans, Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive, Prognosis, Protein Kinase Inhibitors
Show Abstract · Added March 20, 2014
The 2014 NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia recommend quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) standardized to International Scale (IS) as the preferred method for monitoring molecular response to tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy. A BCR-ABL1 transcript level of 10% or less (IS) is now included as the response milestone at 3 and 6 months. Change of therapy to an alternate TKI is recommended for patients with BCR-ABL1 transcript levels greater than 10% (IS) at 3 months after primary treatment with imatinib. Continuing the same dose of TKI or switching to an alternate TKI are options for patients with BCR-ABL1 transcript levels greater than 10% (IS) at 3 months after primary treatment with dasatinib or nilotinib. The guidelines recommend 6-month evaluation with QPCR (IS) for patients with BCR-ABL1 transcript levels greater than 10% at 3 months. Monitoring with QPCR (IS) every 3 months is recommended for all patients, including those who meet response milestones at 3, 6, 12, and 18 months (BCR-ABL1 transcript level ≤10% [IS] at 3 and 6 months, complete cytogenetic response at 12 and 18 months).
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6 MeSH Terms
Cancer-drug discovery and cardiovascular surveillance.
Groarke JD, Cheng S, Moslehi J
(2013) N Engl J Med 369: 1779-81
MeSH Terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Cardiovascular System, Drug Discovery, Fusion Proteins, bcr-abl, Humans, Imidazoles, Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive, Protein Kinase Inhibitors, Protein-Tyrosine Kinases, Pyridazines, Pyrimidines, Vascular Diseases
Added March 4, 2015
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12 MeSH Terms
Mobilization of Ph chromosome-negative peripheral blood stem cells in a child with chronic myeloid leukemia after imatinib-induced complete molecular remission.
Woods-Swafford W, Vnencak-Jones CL, Loken MR, Manes B, Frangoul H
(2008) Pediatr Blood Cancer 50: 639-41
MeSH Terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Benzamides, Biomarkers, Tumor, Bone Marrow Purging, Child, Filgrastim, Forecasting, Fusion Proteins, bcr-abl, Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor, Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization, Hematopoietic Stem Cells, Humans, Imatinib Mesylate, Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive, Leukemia, Myeloid, Chronic-Phase, Male, Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation, Piperazines, Protein Kinase Inhibitors, Pyrimidines, Recombinant Proteins, Remission Induction
Show Abstract · Added March 27, 2014
Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is rare in the pediatric population. Allogeneic stem cell transplant remains the only curative therapy; however, identifying a fully matched donor is not always possible. Imatinib mesylate has been shown to induce hematologic and cytogenetic response in adults and children with CML. We describe a child who achieved molecular remission with imatinib mesylate. BCR-ABL negative peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) were successfully collected after mobilization with filgrastim.
(c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
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22 MeSH Terms
The p38 MAPK pathway mediates the growth inhibitory effects of interferon-alpha in BCR-ABL-expressing cells.
Mayer IA, Verma A, Grumbach IM, Uddin S, Lekmine F, Ravandi F, Majchrzak B, Fujita S, Fish EN, Platanias LC
(2001) J Biol Chem 276: 28570-7
MeSH Terms: Androstadienes, Cell Division, Cell Line, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel, Enzyme Activation, Enzyme Inhibitors, Fusion Proteins, bcr-abl, Genistein, Humans, Imidazoles, Immunoblotting, Interferon-alpha, Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins, K562 Cells, MAP Kinase Signaling System, Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases, Phosphorylation, Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases, Pyridines, Tyrosine, Wortmannin, p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
The mechanisms by which interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) mediates its anti-leukemic effects in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cells are not known. We determined whether p38 MAPK is activated by IFN-alpha in BCR-ABL-expressing cells and whether its function is required for the generation of growth inhibitory responses. IFN-alpha treatment induced phosphorylation/activation of p38 in the IFN-alpha-sensitive KT-1 cell line, but not in IFN-alpha-resistant K562 cells. Consistent with this, IFN-alpha treatment of KT-1 (but not K562) cells induced activation of the small GTPase Rac1, which functions as an upstream regulator of p38. In addition, IFN-alpha-dependent phosphorylation/activation of p38 was induced by treatment of primary granulocytes isolated from the peripheral blood of patients with CML. To define the functional role of the Rac1/p38 MAPK pathway in IFN-alpha signaling, the effects of pharmacological inhibition of p38 on the induction of IFN-alpha responses were determined. Treatment of KT-1 cells with the p38-specific inhibitors SB203580 and SB202190 reversed the growth inhibitory effects of IFN-alpha. On the other hand, the MEK kinase inhibitor PD098059 had no effects, further demonstrating the specificity of these findings. To directly determine the significance of IFN-alpha-dependent activation of p38 in the induction of the anti-leukemic effects of IFN-alpha, we evaluated the effects of p38 inhibition on leukemic colony formation in bone marrow samples of patients with CML. IFN-alpha inhibited leukemic granulocyte/macrophage colony formation in a dose-dependent manner, whereas concomitant treatment with p38 inhibitors reversed such an inhibition. Thus, the Rac1/p38 MAPK pathway is activated by IFN-alpha in BCR-ABL-expressing cells and appears to play a key role in the generation of the growth inhibitory effects of IFN-alpha in CML cells.
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23 MeSH Terms
Engagement of the CrkL adaptor in interferon alpha signalling in BCR-ABL-expressing cells.
Grumbach IM, Mayer IA, Uddin S, Lekmine F, Majchrzak B, Yamauchi H, Fujita S, Druker B, Fish EN, Platanias LC
(2001) Br J Haematol 112: 327-36
MeSH Terms: Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing, DNA-Binding Proteins, Fusion Proteins, bcr-abl, Humans, Immunoblotting, Interferon-alpha, Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive, Milk Proteins, Nuclear Proteins, Phosphorylation, STAT5 Transcription Factor, Signal Transduction, Trans-Activators, Tumor Cells, Cultured
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
Interferon alpha (IFNalpha) has significant clinical activity in the treatment of patients with chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML), but the mechanisms of its selective efficacy in the treatment of the disease are unknown. The CrkL adaptor protein interacts directly with the BCR-ABL fusion protein that causes the malignant transformation and is constitutively phosphorylated in BCR-ABL-expressing cells. In the present study, we provide evidence that CrkL was engaged in IFNalpha-signalling in the CML-derived KT-1 cell line, which expresses BCR-ABL and is sensitive to the growth inhibitory effects of IFNalpha. CrkL is constitutively associated with BCR-ABL in these cells and treatment with IFNalpha had no effect on the BCR-ABL/CrkL interaction. After IFNalpha stimulation, CrkL associated with Stat5, which also underwent phosphorylation in an IFNalpha-dependent manner. The interaction of CrkL with Stat5 was facilitated by the function of both the SH2 and the N-terminus SH3 domains of CrkL. The resulting CrkL-Stat5 complex translocated to the nucleus and could be detected in gel shift assays using elements derived from either the beta-casein promoter or the promoter of the PML gene, an IFNalpha-inducible gene that mediates growth inhibitory responses. In addition to its interaction with Stat5, CrkL interacts with C3G in KT-1 cells and such an interaction regulates the downstream activation of the small GTPase Rap1, which also mediates inhibition of cell proliferation. Thus, despite its engagement by BCR-ABL in CML-derived cells, CrkL mediates activation of downstream signalling pathways in response to the activated type I IFN receptor and such signals may contribute to the generation of the anti-proliferative effects of IFNalpha in CML.
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14 MeSH Terms
Oncogenic Abl and Src tyrosine kinases elicit the ubiquitin-dependent degradation of target proteins through a Ras-independent pathway.
Dai Z, Quackenbush RC, Courtney KD, Grove M, Cortez D, Reuther GW, Pendergast AM
(1998) Genes Dev 12: 1415-24
MeSH Terms: Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing, Animals, Bone Marrow, Cysteine Endopeptidases, Cytoskeletal Proteins, Fusion Proteins, bcr-abl, Gene Expression Regulation, Leukemic, Homeodomain Proteins, Humans, Leukemia, Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive, Mice, Multienzyme Complexes, Neoplasm Proteins, Precursor B-Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma, Proteasome Endopeptidase Complex, Protein Processing, Post-Translational, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-abl, Proto-Oncogene Proteins pp60(c-src), Tumor Cells, Cultured, Ubiquitins, ras Proteins
Show Abstract · Added March 11, 2014
Oncogenic forms of the Abl and Src tyrosine kinases trigger the destruction of the Abi proteins, a family of Abl-interacting proteins that antagonize the oncogenic potential of Abl after overexpression in fibroblasts. The destruction of the Abi proteins requires tyrosine kinase activity and is dependent on the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. We show that degradation of the Abi proteins occurs through a Ras-independent pathway. Significantly, expression of the Abi proteins is lost in cell lines and bone marrow cells isolated from patients with aggressive Bcr-Abl-positive leukemias. These findings suggest that loss of Abi proteins may be a component in the progression of Bcr-Abl-positive leukemias and identify a novel pathway linking activated nonreceptor protein tyrosine kinases to the destruction of specific target proteins through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway.
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22 MeSH Terms
A requirement for NF-kappaB activation in Bcr-Abl-mediated transformation.
Reuther JY, Reuther GW, Cortez D, Pendergast AM, Baldwin AS
(1998) Genes Dev 12: 968-81
MeSH Terms: Animals, Apoptosis, Fusion Proteins, bcr-abl, Gene Expression Regulation, Gene Transfer Techniques, Humans, Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive, Mice, Mice, Nude, NF-kappa B, Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma, Signal Transduction, Transcriptional Activation, Transfection, Transformation, Genetic, Tumor Cells, Cultured
Show Abstract · Added March 11, 2014
Bcr-Abl is a chimeric oncoprotein that is strongly implicated in acute lymphoblastic (ALL) and chronic myelogenous leukemias (CML). This deregulated tyrosine kinase selectively causes hematopoietic disorders resembling human leukemias in animal models and transforms fibroblasts and hematopoietic cells in culture. Bcr-Abl also protects cells from death induced on cytokine deprivation or exposure to DNA damaging agents. In addition, the antiapoptotic function of Bcr-Abl is thought to play a necessary role in hematopoietic transformation and potentially in leukemogenesis. The transcription factor NF-kappaB has been identified recently as an inhibitor of apoptosis and as a potential regulator of cellular transformation. This study shows that expression of Bcr-Abl leads to activation of NF-kappaB-dependent transcription by causing nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB as well as by increasing the transactivation function of the RelA/p65 subunit of NF-kappaB. Importantly, this activation is dependent on the tyrosine kinase activity of Bcr-Abl and partially requires Ras. The ability of Bcr-Abl to protect cytokine-dependent 32D myeloid cells from death induced by cytokine deprivation or DNA damage does not, however, require functional NF-kappaB. However, using a super-repressor form of IkappaBalpha, we show that NF-kappaB is required for Bcr-Abl-mediated tumorigenicity in nude mice and for transformation of primary bone marrow cells. This study implicates NF-kappaB as an important component of Bcr-Abl signaling. NF-kappaB-regulated genes, therefore, likely play a role in transformation by Bcr-Abl and thus in Bcr-Abl-associated human leukemias.
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16 MeSH Terms