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The Innate Immune Protein S100A9 Protects from T-Helper Cell Type 2-mediated Allergic Airway Inflammation.
Palmer LD, Maloney KN, Boyd KL, Goleniewska AK, Toki S, Maxwell CN, Chazin WJ, Peebles RS, Newcomb DC, Skaar EP
(2019) Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol 61: 459-468
MeSH Terms: Adaptive Immunity, Allergens, Alternaria, Alveolitis, Extrinsic Allergic, Animals, Bronchial Hyperreactivity, Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid, Calgranulin A, Calgranulin B, Cytokines, Forkhead Transcription Factors, Immunoglobulin E, Inflammation, Leukocyte L1 Antigen Complex, Lung, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Pulmonary Eosinophilia, Specific Pathogen-Free Organisms, T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory, Th2 Cells
Show Abstract · Added April 7, 2019
Calprotectin is a heterodimer of the proteins S100A8 and S100A9, and it is an abundant innate immune protein associated with inflammation. In humans, calprotectin transcription and protein abundance are associated with asthma and disease severity. However, mechanistic studies in experimental asthma models have been inconclusive, identifying both protective and pathogenic effects of calprotectin. To clarify the role of calprotectin in asthma, calprotectin-deficient and wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 mice were compared in a murine model of allergic airway inflammation. Mice were intranasally challenged with extracts of the clinically relevant allergen, (Alt Ext), or PBS every third day over 9 days. On Day 10, BAL fluid and lung tissue homogenates were harvested and allergic airway inflammation was assessed. Alt Ext challenge induced release of S100A8/S100A9 to the alveolar space and increased protein expression in the alveolar epithelium of WT mice. Compared with WT mice, mice displayed significantly enhanced allergic airway inflammation, including production of IL-13, CCL11, CCL24, serum IgE, eosinophil recruitment, and airway resistance and elastance. In response to Alt Ext, mice accumulated significantly more IL-13IL-5CD4 T-helper type 2 cells. mice also accumulated a significantly lower proportion of CD4 T regulatory (Treg) cells in the lung that had significantly lower expression of CD25. Calprotectin enhanced WT Treg cell suppressive activity . Therefore, this study identifies a role for the innate immune protein, S100A9, in protection from CD4 T-helper type 2 cell hyperinflammation in response to Alt Ext. This protection is mediated, at least in part, by CD4 Treg cell function.
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2 Members
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23 MeSH Terms
Hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl-4-hydroxylation in FOXD1 lineage cells is essential for normal kidney development.
Kobayashi H, Liu J, Urrutia AA, Burmakin M, Ishii K, Rajan M, Davidoff O, Saifudeen Z, Haase VH
(2017) Kidney Int 92: 1370-1383
MeSH Terms: Anemia, Animals, Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors, Cell Hypoxia, Clinical Trials, Phase III as Topic, Disease Models, Animal, Enzyme Inhibitors, Forkhead Transcription Factors, Humans, Hydroxylation, Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-Proline Dioxygenases, Kidney, Kidney Diseases, Mice, Molecular Targeted Therapy, Mutation, Organ Size, Procollagen-Proline Dioxygenase, Renal Insufficiency, Stromal Cells
Show Abstract · Added November 21, 2017
Hypoxia in the embryo is a frequent cause of intra-uterine growth retardation, low birth weight, and multiple organ defects. In the kidney, this can lead to low nephron endowment, predisposing to chronic kidney disease and arterial hypertension. A key component in cellular adaptation to hypoxia is the hypoxia-inducible factor pathway, which is regulated by prolyl-4-hydroxylase domain (PHD) dioxygenases PHD1, PHD2, and PHD3. In the adult kidney, PHD oxygen sensors are differentially expressed in a cell type-dependent manner and control the production of erythropoietin in interstitial cells. However, the role of interstitial cell PHDs in renal development has not been examined. Here we used a genetic approach in mice to interrogate PHD function in FOXD1-expressing stroma during nephrogenesis. We demonstrate that PHD2 and PHD3 are essential for normal kidney development as the combined inactivation of stromal PHD2 and PHD3 resulted in renal failure that was associated with reduced kidney size, decreased numbers of glomeruli, and abnormal postnatal nephron formation. In contrast, nephrogenesis was normal in animals with individual PHD inactivation. We furthermore demonstrate that the defect in nephron formation in PHD2/PHD3 double mutants required intact hypoxia-inducible factor-2 signaling and was dependent on the extent of stromal hypoxia-inducible factor activation. Thus, hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl-4-hydroxylation in renal interstitial cells is critical for normal nephron formation.
Copyright © 2017 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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20 MeSH Terms
Dominant protection from HLA-linked autoimmunity by antigen-specific regulatory T cells.
Ooi JD, Petersen J, Tan YH, Huynh M, Willett ZJ, Ramarathinam SH, Eggenhuizen PJ, Loh KL, Watson KA, Gan PY, Alikhan MA, Dudek NL, Handel A, Hudson BG, Fugger L, Power DA, Holt SG, Coates PT, Gregersen JW, Purcell AW, Holdsworth SR, La Gruta NL, Reid HH, Rossjohn J, Kitching AR
(2017) Nature 545: 243-247
MeSH Terms: Animals, Anti-Glomerular Basement Membrane Disease, Autoimmunity, Base Sequence, CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes, Collagen Type IV, Cytokines, Female, Forkhead Transcription Factors, HLA-DR Serological Subtypes, HLA-DR1 Antigen, Humans, Immunodominant Epitopes, Male, Mice, Mice, Transgenic, Models, Molecular, T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory
Show Abstract · Added June 2, 2017
Susceptibility and protection against human autoimmune diseases, including type I diabetes, multiple sclerosis, and Goodpasture disease, is associated with particular human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles. However, the mechanisms underpinning such HLA-mediated effects on self-tolerance remain unclear. Here we investigate the molecular mechanism of Goodpasture disease, an HLA-linked autoimmune renal disorder characterized by an immunodominant CD4 T-cell self-epitope derived from the α3 chain of type IV collagen (α3). While HLA-DR15 confers a markedly increased disease risk, the protective HLA-DR1 allele is dominantly protective in trans with HLA-DR15 (ref. 2). We show that autoreactive α3-specific T cells expand in patients with Goodpasture disease and, in α3-immunized HLA-DR15 transgenic mice, α3-specific T cells infiltrate the kidney and mice develop Goodpasture disease. HLA-DR15 and HLA-DR1 exhibit distinct peptide repertoires and binding preferences and present the α3 epitope in different binding registers. HLA-DR15-α3 tetramer T cells in HLA-DR15 transgenic mice exhibit a conventional T-cell phenotype (T) that secretes pro-inflammatory cytokines. In contrast, HLA-DR1-α3 tetramer T cells in HLA-DR1 and HLA-DR15/DR1 transgenic mice are predominantly CD4Foxp3 regulatory T cells (T cells) expressing tolerogenic cytokines. HLA-DR1-induced T cells confer resistance to disease in HLA-DR15/DR1 transgenic mice. HLA-DR15 and HLA-DR1 healthy human donors display altered α3-specific T-cell antigen receptor usage, HLA-DR15-α3 tetramer Foxp3 T and HLA-DR1-α3 tetramer Foxp3CD25CD127 T dominant phenotypes. Moreover, patients with Goodpasture disease display a clonally expanded α3-specific CD4 T-cell repertoire. Accordingly, we provide a mechanistic basis for the dominantly protective effect of HLA in autoimmune disease, whereby HLA polymorphism shapes the relative abundance of self-epitope specific T cells that leads to protection or causation of autoimmunity.
1 Communities
1 Members
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18 MeSH Terms
Deep phenotyping of Tregs identifies an immune signature for idiopathic aplastic anemia and predicts response to treatment.
Kordasti S, Costantini B, Seidl T, Perez Abellan P, Martinez Llordella M, McLornan D, Diggins KE, Kulasekararaj A, Benfatto C, Feng X, Smith A, Mian SA, Melchiotti R, de Rinaldis E, Ellis R, Petrov N, Povoleri GA, Chung SS, Thomas NS, Farzaneh F, Irish JM, Heck S, Young NS, Marsh JC, Mufti GJ
(2016) Blood 128: 1193-205
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Anemia, Aplastic, Female, Forkhead Transcription Factors, Humans, Immunologic Memory, Immunosuppression, Interleukin-2, Interleukin-7 Receptor alpha Subunit, Leukocyte Common Antigens, Male, Middle Aged, Receptors, CCR4, STAT5 Transcription Factor, T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory, fas Receptor
Show Abstract · Added June 10, 2016
Idiopathic aplastic anemia (AA) is an immune-mediated and serious form of bone marrow failure. Akin to other autoimmune diseases, we have previously shown that in AA regulatory T cells (Tregs) are reduced in number and function. The aim of this study was to further characterize Treg subpopulations in AA and investigate the potential correlation between specific Treg subsets and response to immunosuppressive therapy (IST) as well as their in vitro expandability for potential clinical use. Using mass cytometry and an unbiased multidimensional analytical approach, we identified 2 specific human Treg subpopulations (Treg A and Treg B) with distinct phenotypes, gene expression, expandability, and function. Treg B predominates in IST responder patients, has a memory/activated phenotype (with higher expression of CD95, CCR4, and CD45RO within FOXP3(hi), CD127(lo) Tregs), expresses the interleukin-2 (IL-2)/STAT5 pathway and cell-cycle commitment genes. Furthermore, in vitro-expanded Tregs become functional and take on the characteristics of Treg B. Collectively, this study identifies human Treg subpopulations that can be used as predictive biomarkers for response to IST in AA and potentially other autoimmune diseases. We also show that Tregs from AA patients are IL-2-sensitive and expandable in vitro, suggesting novel therapeutic approaches such as low-dose IL-2 therapy and/or expanded autologous Tregs and meriting further exploration.
2 Communities
1 Members
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17 MeSH Terms
Distinct subpopulations of FOXD1 stroma-derived cells regulate renal erythropoietin.
Kobayashi H, Liu Q, Binns TC, Urrutia AA, Davidoff O, Kapitsinou PP, Pfaff AS, Olauson H, Wernerson A, Fogo AB, Fong GH, Gross KW, Haase VH
(2016) J Clin Invest 126: 1926-38
MeSH Terms: Animals, Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors, Erythropoietin, Forkhead Transcription Factors, Hypoxia, Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-Proline Dioxygenases, Kidney, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Procollagen-Proline Dioxygenase, Stromal Cells
Show Abstract · Added May 3, 2016
Renal peritubular interstitial fibroblast-like cells are critical for adult erythropoiesis, as they are the main source of erythropoietin (EPO). Hypoxia-inducible factor 2 (HIF-2) controls EPO synthesis in the kidney and liver and is regulated by prolyl-4-hydroxylase domain (PHD) dioxygenases PHD1, PHD2, and PHD3, which function as cellular oxygen sensors. Renal interstitial cells with EPO-producing capacity are poorly characterized, and the role of the PHD/HIF-2 axis in renal EPO-producing cell (REPC) plasticity is unclear. Here we targeted the PHD/HIF-2/EPO axis in FOXD1 stroma-derived renal interstitial cells and examined the role of individual PHDs in REPC pool size regulation and renal EPO output. Renal interstitial cells with EPO-producing capacity were entirely derived from FOXD1-expressing stroma, and Phd2 inactivation alone induced renal Epo in a limited number of renal interstitial cells. EPO induction was submaximal, as hypoxia or pharmacologic PHD inhibition further increased the REPC fraction among Phd2-/- renal interstitial cells. Moreover, Phd1 and Phd3 were differentially expressed in renal interstitium, and heterozygous deficiency for Phd1 and Phd3 increased REPC numbers in Phd2-/- mice. We propose that FOXD1 lineage renal interstitial cells consist of distinct subpopulations that differ in their responsiveness to Phd2 inactivation and thus regulation of HIF-2 activity and EPO production under hypoxia or conditions of pharmacologic or genetic PHD inactivation.
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11 MeSH Terms
p73 Is Required for Multiciliogenesis and Regulates the Foxj1-Associated Gene Network.
Marshall CB, Mays DJ, Beeler JS, Rosenbluth JM, Boyd KL, Santos Guasch GL, Shaver TM, Tang LJ, Liu Q, Shyr Y, Venters BJ, Magnuson MA, Pietenpol JA
(2016) Cell Rep 14: 2289-300
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bronchioles, Cell Differentiation, Cells, Cultured, Cilia, Epithelial Cells, Epithelium, Female, Forkhead Transcription Factors, Gene Regulatory Networks, Lung, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Mice, Transgenic, Phosphoproteins, RNA Interference, Sequence Analysis, RNA, Trachea, Trans-Activators, Transcriptome, Tumor Protein p73
Show Abstract · Added March 17, 2016
We report that p73 is expressed in multiciliated cells (MCCs), is required for MCC differentiation, and directly regulates transcriptional modulators of multiciliogenesis. Loss of ciliary biogenesis provides a unifying mechanism for many phenotypes observed in p73 knockout mice including hydrocephalus; hippocampal dysgenesis; sterility; and chronic inflammation/infection of lung, middle ear, and sinus. Through p73 and p63 ChIP-seq using murine tracheal cells, we identified over 100 putative p73 target genes that regulate MCC differentiation and homeostasis. We validated Foxj1, a transcriptional regulator of multiciliogenesis, and many other cilia-associated genes as direct target genes of p73 and p63. We show p73 and p63 are co-expressed in a subset of basal cells and suggest that p73 marks these cells for MCC differentiation. In summary, p73 is essential for MCC differentiation, functions as a critical regulator of a transcriptome required for MCC differentiation, and, like p63, has an essential role in development of tissues.
Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
3 Communities
2 Members
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23 MeSH Terms
Prenatal Diagnosis of Alveolar Capillary Dysplasia with Misalignment of Pulmonary Veins.
Prothro SL, Plosa E, Markham M, Szafranski P, Stankiewicz P, Killen SA
(2016) J Pediatr 170: 317-8
MeSH Terms: Adult, Chorionic Villi Sampling, Fatal Outcome, Female, Forkhead Transcription Factors, Gene Deletion, Genetic Markers, Humans, Persistent Fetal Circulation Syndrome, Pregnancy, Pulmonary Alveoli, Pulmonary Veins
Show Abstract · Added March 18, 2020
Alveolar capillary dysplasia with misalignment of pulmonary veins (ACDMPV) is a rare, lethal cause of neonatal respiratory failure and persistent pulmonary hypertension. We present a presumptive prenatal diagnosis of ACDMPV based on chorionic villus sampling of a FOXF1 mutation in a fetus with extra-pulmonary anomalies often associated with ACDMPV.
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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1 Members
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MeSH Terms
Activation of FoxM1 Revitalizes the Replicative Potential of Aged β-Cells in Male Mice and Enhances Insulin Secretion.
Golson ML, Dunn JC, Maulis MF, Dadi PK, Osipovich AB, Magnuson MA, Jacobson DA, Gannon M
(2015) Diabetes 64: 3829-38
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Proliferation, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Forkhead Box Protein M1, Forkhead Transcription Factors, Insulin, Insulin Secretion, Insulin-Secreting Cells, Male, Mice
Show Abstract · Added August 29, 2015
Type 2 diabetes incidence increases with age, while β-cell replication declines. The transcription factor FoxM1 is required for β-cell replication in various situations, and its expression declines with age. We hypothesized that increased FoxM1 activity in aged β-cells would rejuvenate proliferation. Induction of an activated form of FoxM1 was sufficient to increase β-cell mass and proliferation in 12-month-old male mice after just 2 weeks. Unexpectedly, at 2 months of age, induction of activated FoxM1 in male mice improved glucose homeostasis with unchanged β-cell mass. Cells expressing activated FoxM1 demonstrated enhanced glucose-stimulated Ca2+ influx, which resulted in improved glucose tolerance through enhanced β-cell function. Conversely, our laboratory has previously demonstrated that mice lacking FoxM1 in the pancreas display glucose intolerance or diabetes with only a 60% reduction in β-cell mass, suggesting that the loss of FoxM1 is detrimental to β-cell function. Ex vivo insulin secretion was therefore examined in size-matched islets from young mice lacking FoxM1 in β-cells. Foxm1-deficient islets indeed displayed reduced insulin secretion. Our studies reveal that activated FoxM1 increases β-cell replication while simultaneously enhancing insulin secretion and improving glucose homeostasis, making FoxM1 an attractive therapeutic target for diabetes.
© 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.
2 Communities
4 Members
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10 MeSH Terms
FOXP3+ regulatory T cell development and function require histone/protein deacetylase 3.
Wang L, Liu Y, Han R, Beier UH, Bhatti TR, Akimova T, Greene MI, Hiebert SW, Hancock WW
(2015) J Clin Invest 125: 1111-23
MeSH Terms: Animals, Autoimmunity, Cells, Cultured, Forkhead Transcription Factors, Gene Expression Regulation, HEK293 Cells, Histone Deacetylases, Humans, Interleukin-2, Lymphocyte Activation, Male, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory
Show Abstract · Added September 28, 2015
Treg dysfunction is associated with a variety of inflammatory diseases. Treg populations are defined by expression of the oligomeric transcription factor FOXP3 and inability to produce IL-2, a cytokine required for T cell maintenance and survival. FOXP3 activity is regulated post-translationally by histone/protein acetyltransferases and histone/protein deacetylases (HDACs). Here, we determined that HDAC3 mediates both the development and function of the two main Treg subsets, thymus-derived Tregs and induced Tregs (iTregs). We determined that HDAC3 and FOXP3 physically interact and that HDAC3 expression markedly reduces Il2 promoter activity. In murine models, conditional deletion of Hdac3 during thymic Treg development restored Treg production of IL-2 and blocked the suppressive function of Tregs. HDAC3-deficient mice died from autoimmunity by 4-6 weeks of age; however, injection of WT FOXP3+ Tregs prolonged survival. Adoptive transfer of Hdac3-deficient Tregs, unlike WT Tregs, did not control T cell proliferation in naive mice and did not prevent allograft rejection or colitis. HDAC3 also regulated the development of iTregs, as HDAC3-deficient conventional T cells were not converted into iTregs under polarizing conditions and produced large amounts of IL-2, IL-6, and IL-17. We conclude that HDAC3 is essential for the normal development and suppressive functions of thymic and peripheral FOXP3+ Tregs.
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15 MeSH Terms
Age- and manganese-dependent modulation of dopaminergic phenotypes in a C. elegans DJ-1 genetic model of Parkinson's disease.
Chen P, DeWitt MR, Bornhorst J, Soares FA, Mukhopadhyay S, Bowman AB, Aschner M
(2015) Metallomics 7: 289-98
MeSH Terms: Aging, Aldehyde Oxidoreductases, Animals, Caenorhabditis elegans, Caenorhabditis elegans Proteins, Disease Models, Animal, Dopaminergic Neurons, Forkhead Transcription Factors, Gene Deletion, Green Fluorescent Proteins, Longevity, Manganese, Models, Biological, Models, Genetic, Movement, Parkinson Disease, Phenotype, Signal Transduction, Survival Analysis
Show Abstract · Added February 15, 2016
Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease, yet its etiology and pathogenesis are poorly understood. PD is characterized by selective dopaminergic (DAergic) degeneration and progressive hypokinetic motor impairment. Mutations in dj-1 cause autosomal recessive early-onset PD. DJ-1 is thought to protect DAergic neurons via an antioxidant mechanism, but the precise basis of this protection has not yet been resolved. Aging and manganese (Mn) exposure are significant non-genetic risk factors for PD. Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) is an optimal model for PD and aging studies because of its simple nervous system, conserved DAergic machinery, and short 20-day lifespan. Here we tested the hypothesis that C. elegans DJ-1 homologues were protective against Mn-induced DAergic toxicity in an age-dependent manner. We showed that the deletion of C. elegans DJ-1 related (djr) genes, djr-1.2, decreased survival after Mn exposure. djr-1.2, the DJ-1 homologue was expressed in DAergic neurons and its deletion decreased lifespan and dopamine (DA)-dependent dauer movement behavior after Mn exposure. We also tested the role of DAF-16 as a regulator of dj-1.2 interaction with Mn toxicity. Lifespan defects resulting from djr-1.2 deletion could be restored to normal by overexpression of either DJR-1.2 or DAF-16. Furthermore, dauer movement alterations after djr-1.2 deletion were abolished by constitutive activation of DAF-16 through mutation of its inhibitor, DAF-2 insulin receptor. Taken together, our results reveal PD-relevant interactions between aging, the PD environmental risk factor manganese, and homologues of the established PD genetic risk factor DJ-1. Our data demonstrate a novel role for the DJ-1 homologue, djr-1.2, in mitigating Mn-dependent lifespan reduction and DA signaling alterations, involving DAF-2/DAF-16 signaling.
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19 MeSH Terms