Other search tools

About this data

The publication data currently available has been vetted by Vanderbilt faculty, staff, administrators and trainees. The data itself is retrieved directly from NCBI's PubMed and is automatically updated on a weekly basis to ensure accuracy and completeness.

If you have any questions or comments, please contact us.

Results: 1 to 10 of 105

Publication Record

Connections

A Shared Pattern of β-Catenin Activation in Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia and Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis.
Sucre JMS, Deutsch GH, Jetter CS, Ambalavanan N, Benjamin JT, Gleaves LA, Millis BA, Young LR, Blackwell TS, Kropski JA, Guttentag SH
(2018) Am J Pathol 188: 853-862
MeSH Terms: A549 Cells, Adult, Animals, Animals, Newborn, Axin Protein, Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia, Cell Nucleus, Epithelial Cells, Female, Fetus, Humans, Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis, Lung, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Phosphorylation, Pregnancy, Pregnancy Trimester, Second, Protein Processing, Post-Translational, Signal Transduction, Tyrosine, beta Catenin
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2018
Wnt/β-catenin signaling is necessary for normal lung development, and abnormal Wnt signaling contributes to the pathogenesis of both bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), fibrotic lung diseases that occur during infancy and aging, respectively. Using a library of human normal and diseased human lung samples, we identified a distinct signature of nuclear accumulation of β-catenin phosphorylated at tyrosine 489 and epithelial cell cytosolic localization of β-catenin phosphorylated at tyrosine 654 in early normal lung development and fibrotic lung diseases BPD and IPF. Furthermore, this signature was recapitulated in murine models of BPD and IPF. Image analysis of immunofluorescence colocalization demonstrated a consistent pattern of elevated nuclear phosphorylated β-catenin in the lung epithelium and surrounding mesenchyme in BPD and IPF, closely resembling the pattern observed in 18-week fetal lung. Nuclear β-catenin phosphorylated at tyrosine 489 associated with an increased expression of Wnt target gene AXIN2, suggesting that the observed β-catenin signature is of functional significance during normal development and injury repair. The association of specific modifications of β-catenin during normal lung development and again in response to lung injury supports the widely held concept that repair of lung injury involves the recapitulation of developmental programs. Furthermore, these observations suggest that β-catenin phosphorylation has potential as a therapeutic target for the treatment and prevention of both BPD and IPF.
Copyright © 2018 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
2 Members
0 Resources
21 MeSH Terms
The innate immune response in fetal lung mesenchymal cells targets VEGFR2 expression and activity.
Medal RM, Im AM, Yamamoto Y, Lakhdari O, Blackwell TS, Hoffman HM, Sahoo D, Prince LS
(2017) Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 312: L861-L872
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Communication, Cell Movement, Epithelial Cells, Fetus, Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental, Immunity, Innate, Lipopolysaccharides, Lung, Mesoderm, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Signal Transduction, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-2
Show Abstract · Added March 29, 2017
In preterm infants, soluble inflammatory mediators target lung mesenchymal cells, disrupting airway and alveolar morphogenesis. However, how mesenchymal cells respond directly to microbial stimuli remains poorly characterized. Our objective was to measure the genome-wide innate immune response in fetal lung mesenchymal cells exposed to the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS). With the use of Affymetrix MoGene 1.0st arrays, we showed that LPS induced expression of unique innate immune transcripts heavily weighted toward CC and CXC family chemokines. The transcriptional response was different between cells from E11, E15, and E18 mouse lungs. In all cells tested, LPS inhibited expression of a small core group of genes including the VEGF receptor Although best characterized in vascular endothelial populations, we demonstrated here that fetal mouse lung mesenchymal cells express and respond to VEGF-A stimulation. In mesenchymal cells, VEGF-A increased cell migration, activated the ERK/AKT pathway, and promoted FOXO3A nuclear exclusion. With the use of an experimental coculture model of epithelial-mesenchymal interactions, we also showed that VEGFR2 inhibition prevented formation of three-dimensional structures. Both LPS and tyrosine kinase inhibition reduced three-dimensional structure formation. Our data suggest a novel mechanism for inflammation-mediated defects in lung development involving reduced VEGF signaling in lung mesenchyme.
Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.
1 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
13 MeSH Terms
Neutralizing human antibodies prevent Zika virus replication and fetal disease in mice.
Sapparapu G, Fernandez E, Kose N, Bin Cao , Fox JM, Bombardi RG, Zhao H, Nelson CA, Bryan AL, Barnes T, Davidson E, Mysorekar IU, Fremont DH, Doranz BJ, Diamond MS, Crowe JE
(2016) Nature 540: 443-447
MeSH Terms: Africa, Americas, Animals, Antibodies, Monoclonal, Antibodies, Neutralizing, Antibodies, Viral, Antibody Specificity, Asia, B-Lymphocytes, Disease Models, Animal, Epitope Mapping, Female, Fetal Diseases, Fetus, Humans, Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical, Male, Mice, Models, Molecular, Placenta, Pregnancy, Protein Multimerization, Survival Rate, Viral Proteins, Viral Vaccines, Virus Replication, Zika Virus, Zika Virus Infection
Show Abstract · Added April 13, 2017
Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging mosquito-transmitted flavivirus that can cause severe disease, including congenital birth defects during pregnancy. To develop candidate therapeutic agents against ZIKV, we isolated a panel of human monoclonal antibodies from subjects that were previously infected with ZIKV. We show that a subset of antibodies recognize diverse epitopes on the envelope (E) protein and exhibit potent neutralizing activity. One of the most inhibitory antibodies, ZIKV-117, broadly neutralized infection of ZIKV strains corresponding to African and Asian-American lineages. Epitope mapping studies revealed that ZIKV-117 recognized a unique quaternary epitope on the E protein dimer-dimer interface. We evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of ZIKV-117 in pregnant and non-pregnant mice. Monoclonal antibody treatment markedly reduced tissue pathology, placental and fetal infection, and mortality in mice. Thus, neutralizing human antibodies can protect against maternal-fetal transmission, infection and disease, and reveal important determinants for structure-based rational vaccine design efforts.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
28 MeSH Terms
Sox10 Regulates Stem/Progenitor and Mesenchymal Cell States in Mammary Epithelial Cells.
Dravis C, Spike BT, Harrell JC, Johns C, Trejo CL, Southard-Smith EM, Perou CM, Wahl GM
(2015) Cell Rep 12: 2035-48
MeSH Terms: Animals, Breast Neoplasms, Cell Culture Techniques, Cell Differentiation, Epithelial Cells, Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition, Female, Fetus, Fibroblast Growth Factors, Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Humans, Mammary Glands, Animal, Mammary Glands, Human, Mesenchymal Stem Cells, Mice, SOXE Transcription Factors, Signal Transduction, Spheroids, Cellular, Tumor Cells, Cultured
Show Abstract · Added September 28, 2015
To discover mechanisms that mediate plasticity in mammary cells, we characterized signaling networks that are present in the mammary stem cells responsible for fetal and adult mammary development. These analyses identified a signaling axis between FGF signaling and the transcription factor Sox10. Here, we show that Sox10 is specifically expressed in mammary cells exhibiting the highest levels of stem/progenitor activity. This includes fetal and adult mammary cells in vivo and mammary organoids in vitro. Sox10 is functionally relevant, as its deletion reduces stem/progenitor competence whereas its overexpression increases stem/progenitor activity. Intriguingly, we also show that Sox10 overexpression causes mammary cells to undergo a mesenchymal transition. Consistent with these findings, Sox10 is preferentially expressed in stem- and mesenchymal-like breast cancers. These results demonstrate a signaling mechanism through which stem and mesenchymal states are acquired in mammary cells and suggest therapeutic avenues in breast cancers for which targeted therapies are currently unavailable.
Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
20 MeSH Terms
Cloning and variation of ground state intestinal stem cells.
Wang X, Yamamoto Y, Wilson LH, Zhang T, Howitt BE, Farrow MA, Kern F, Ning G, Hong Y, Khor CC, Chevalier B, Bertrand D, Wu L, Nagarajan N, Sylvester FA, Hyams JS, Devers T, Bronson R, Lacy DB, Ho KY, Crum CP, McKeon F, Xian W
(2015) Nature 522: 173-8
MeSH Terms: Bacterial Toxins, Cell Differentiation, Cell Lineage, Cells, Cultured, Clone Cells, Clostridium difficile, Colon, Enterocolitis, Pseudomembranous, Epigenesis, Genetic, Epithelium, Fetus, Genomic Instability, Humans, Intestine, Small, Intestines, Organoids, Stem Cells
Show Abstract · Added September 28, 2015
Stem cells of the gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, liver and other columnar epithelia collectively resist cloning in their elemental states. Here we demonstrate the cloning and propagation of highly clonogenic, 'ground state' stem cells of the human intestine and colon. We show that derived stem-cell pedigrees sustain limited copy number and sequence variation despite extensive serial passaging and display exquisitely precise, cell-autonomous commitment to epithelial differentiation consistent with their origins along the intestinal tract. This developmentally patterned and epigenetically maintained commitment of stem cells is likely to enforce the functional specificity of the adult intestinal tract. Using clonally derived colonic epithelia, we show that toxins A or B of the enteric pathogen Clostridium difficile recapitulate the salient features of pseudomembranous colitis. The stability of the epigenetic commitment programs of these stem cells, coupled with their unlimited replicative expansion and maintained clonogenicity, suggests certain advantages for their use in disease modelling and regenerative medicine.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
17 MeSH Terms
Novel Observations From Next-Generation RNA Sequencing of Highly Purified Human Adult and Fetal Islet Cell Subsets.
Blodgett DM, Nowosielska A, Afik S, Pechhold S, Cura AJ, Kennedy NJ, Kim S, Kucukural A, Davis RJ, Kent SC, Greiner DL, Garber MG, Harlan DM, diIorio P
(2015) Diabetes 64: 3172-81
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Child, Preschool, Female, Fetus, Gene Expression Profiling, Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental, Glucagon-Secreting Cells, Humans, Insulin-Secreting Cells, Islets of Langerhans, Male, Middle Aged, Pregnancy, Pregnancy Trimester, Second, RNA, Sequence Analysis, RNA, Somatostatin-Secreting Cells, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added October 12, 2016
Understanding distinct gene expression patterns of normal adult and developing fetal human pancreatic α- and β-cells is crucial for developing stem cell therapies, islet regeneration strategies, and therapies designed to increase β-cell function in patients with diabetes (type 1 or 2). Toward that end, we have developed methods to highly purify α-, β-, and δ-cells from human fetal and adult pancreata by intracellular staining for the cell-specific hormone content, sorting the subpopulations by flow cytometry, and, using next-generation RNA sequencing, we report the detailed transcriptomes of fetal and adult α- and β-cells. We observed that human islet composition was not influenced by age, sex, or BMI, and transcripts for inflammatory gene products were noted in fetal β-cells. In addition, within highly purified adult glucagon-expressing α-cells, we observed surprisingly high insulin mRNA expression, but not insulin protein expression. This transcriptome analysis from highly purified islet α- and β-cell subsets from fetal and adult pancreata offers clear implications for strategies that seek to increase insulin expression in type 1 and type 2 diabetes.
© 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
19 MeSH Terms
The kinetochore protein, CENPF, is mutated in human ciliopathy and microcephaly phenotypes.
Waters AM, Asfahani R, Carroll P, Bicknell L, Lescai F, Bright A, Chanudet E, Brooks A, Christou-Savina S, Osman G, Walsh P, Bacchelli C, Chapgier A, Vernay B, Bader DM, Deshpande C, O' Sullivan M, Ocaka L, Stanescu H, Stewart HS, Hildebrandt F, Otto E, Johnson CA, Szymanska K, Katsanis N, Davis E, Kleta R, Hubank M, Doxsey S, Jackson A, Stupka E, Winey M, Beales PL
(2015) J Med Genet 52: 147-56
MeSH Terms: Animals, Centrioles, Chromosomal Proteins, Non-Histone, Cilia, Exome, Female, Fetus, Genetics, Medical, HEK293 Cells, High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing, Humans, Male, Mice, Microcephaly, Microfilament Proteins, Mutation, NIH 3T3 Cells, Pedigree, Pregnancy, Zebrafish
Show Abstract · Added September 28, 2015
BACKGROUND - Mutations in microtubule-regulating genes are associated with disorders of neuronal migration and microcephaly. Regulation of centriole length has been shown to underlie the pathogenesis of certain ciliopathy phenotypes. Using a next-generation sequencing approach, we identified mutations in a novel centriolar disease gene in a kindred with an embryonic lethal ciliopathy phenotype and in a patient with primary microcephaly.
METHODS AND RESULTS - Whole exome sequencing data from a non-consanguineous Caucasian kindred exhibiting mid-gestation lethality and ciliopathic malformations revealed two novel non-synonymous variants in CENPF, a microtubule-regulating gene. All four affected fetuses showed segregation for two mutated alleles [IVS5-2A>C, predicted to abolish the consensus splice-acceptor site from exon 6; c.1744G>T, p.E582X]. In a second unrelated patient exhibiting microcephaly, we identified two CENPF mutations [c.1744G>T, p.E582X; c.8692 C>T, p.R2898X] by whole exome sequencing. We found that CENP-F colocalised with Ninein at the subdistal appendages of the mother centriole in mouse inner medullary collecting duct cells. Intraflagellar transport protein-88 (IFT-88) colocalised with CENP-F along the ciliary axonemes of renal epithelial cells in age-matched control human fetuses but did not in truncated cilia of mutant CENPF kidneys. Pairwise co-immunoprecipitation assays of mitotic and serum-starved HEKT293 cells confirmed that IFT88 precipitates with endogenous CENP-F.
CONCLUSIONS - Our data identify CENPF as a new centriolar disease gene implicated in severe human ciliopathy and microcephaly related phenotypes. CENP-F has a novel putative function in ciliogenesis and cortical neurogenesis.
Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.
1 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
20 MeSH Terms
Maternal influences on fetal microbial colonization and immune development.
Romano-Keeler J, Weitkamp JH
(2015) Pediatr Res 77: 189-95
MeSH Terms: Female, Fetus, Humans, Immune System, Maternal-Fetal Exchange, Microbiota, Models, Immunological, Placenta, Pregnancy
Show Abstract · Added February 12, 2015
While critical for normal development, the exact timing of establishment of the intestinal microbiome is unknown. For example, although preterm labor and birth have been associated with bacterial colonization of the amniotic cavity and fetal membranes for many years, the prevailing dogma of a sterile intrauterine environment during normal term pregnancies has been challenged more recently. While found to be a key contributor of evolution in the animal kingdom, maternal transmission of commensal bacteria may also constitute a critical process during healthy pregnancies in humans with yet unclear developmental importance. Metagenomic sequencing has elucidated a rich placental microbiome in normal term pregnancies likely providing important metabolic and immune contributions to the growing fetus. Conversely, an altered microbial composition during pregnancy may produce aberrant metabolites impairing fetal brain development and life-long neurological outcomes. Here we review the current understanding of microbial colonization at the feto-maternal interface and explain how normal gut colonization drives a balanced neonatal mucosal immune system, while dysbiosis contributes to aberrant immune function early in life and beyond. We discuss how maternal genetics, diet, medications, and probiotics inform the fetal microbiome in preparation for perinatal and postnatal bacterial colonization.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
9 MeSH Terms
Lymphatic function is required prenatally for lung inflation at birth.
Jakus Z, Gleghorn JP, Enis DR, Sen A, Chia S, Liu X, Rawnsley DR, Yang Y, Hess PR, Zou Z, Yang J, Guttentag SH, Nelson CM, Kahn ML
(2014) J Exp Med 211: 815-26
MeSH Terms: Animals, Animals, Newborn, Calcium-Binding Proteins, DNA Primers, Echocardiography, Embryo, Mammalian, Fetus, Immunohistochemistry, Lung, Lung Compliance, Lymphatic System, Lymphography, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Microscopy, Electron, Transmission, Pulmonary Edema, Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction, Tumor Suppressor Proteins, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-3
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
Mammals must inflate their lungs and breathe within minutes of birth to survive. A key regulator of neonatal lung inflation is pulmonary surfactant, a lipoprotein complex which increases lung compliance by reducing alveolar surface tension (Morgan, 1971). Whether other developmental processes also alter lung mechanics in preparation for birth is unknown. We identify prenatal lymphatic function as an unexpected requirement for neonatal lung inflation and respiration. Mice lacking lymphatic vessels, due either to loss of the lymphangiogenic factor CCBE1 or VEGFR3 function, appear cyanotic and die shortly after birth due to failure of lung inflation. Failure of lung inflation is not due to reduced surfactant levels or altered development of the lung but is associated with an elevated wet/dry ratio consistent with edema. Embryonic studies reveal active lymphatic function in the late gestation lung, and significantly reduced total lung compliance in late gestation embryos that lack lymphatics. These findings reveal that lymphatic vascular function plays a previously unrecognized mechanical role in the developing lung that prepares it for inflation at birth. They explain respiratory failure in infants with congenital pulmonary lymphangiectasia, and suggest that inadequate late gestation lymphatic function may also contribute to respiratory failure in premature infants.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
19 MeSH Terms
A selective phenelzine analogue inhibitor of histone demethylase LSD1.
Prusevich P, Kalin JH, Ming SA, Basso M, Givens J, Li X, Hu J, Taylor MS, Cieniewicz AM, Hsiao PY, Huang R, Roberson H, Adejola N, Avery LB, Casero RA, Taverna SD, Qian J, Tackett AJ, Ratan RR, McDonald OG, Feinberg AP, Cole PA
(2014) ACS Chem Biol 9: 1284-93
MeSH Terms: Animals, Blotting, Western, Cell Survival, Cells, Cultured, DNA Methylation, Embryo, Mammalian, Enzyme Inhibitors, Fetus, Histone Demethylases, Histones, Humans, Monoamine Oxidase, Neurons, Phenelzine, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Show Abstract · Added May 5, 2016
Lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) is an epigenetic enzyme that oxidatively cleaves methyl groups from monomethyl and dimethyl Lys4 of histone H3 (H3K4Me1, H3K4Me2) and can contribute to gene silencing. This study describes the design and synthesis of analogues of a monoamine oxidase antidepressant, phenelzine, and their LSD1 inhibitory properties. A novel phenelzine analogue (bizine) containing a phenyl-butyrylamide appendage was shown to be a potent LSD1 inhibitor in vitro and was selective versus monoamine oxidases A/B and the LSD1 homologue, LSD2. Bizine was found to be effective at modulating bulk histone methylation in cancer cells, and ChIP-seq experiments revealed a statistically significant overlap in the H3K4 methylation pattern of genes affected by bizine and those altered in LSD1-/- cells. Treatment of two cancer cell lines, LNCaP and H460, with bizine conferred a reduction in proliferation rate, and bizine showed additive to synergistic effects on cell growth when used in combination with two out of five HDAC inhibitors tested. Moreover, neurons exposed to oxidative stress were protected by the presence of bizine, suggesting potential applications in neurodegenerative disease.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
16 MeSH Terms