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Low bone toughness in the TallyHO model of juvenile type 2 diabetes does not worsen with age.
Creecy A, Uppuganti S, Unal M, Clay Bunn R, Voziyan P, Nyman JS
(2018) Bone 110: 204-214
MeSH Terms: Aging, Animals, Arginine, Bone Density, Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Femur, Fractures, Bone, Lysine, Male, Mice, Spectrum Analysis, Raman, X-Ray Microtomography
Show Abstract · Added February 19, 2018
Fracture risk increases as type 2 diabetes (T2D) progresses. With the rising incidence of T2D, in particular early-onset T2D, a representative pre-clinical model is needed to study mechanisms for treating or preventing diabetic bone disease. Towards that goal, we hypothesized that fracture resistance of bone from diabetic TallyHO mice decreases as the duration of diabetes increases. Femurs and lumbar vertebrae were harvested from male, TallyHO mice and male, non-diabetic SWR/J mice at 16weeks (n≥12 per strain) and 34weeks (n≥13 per strain) of age. As is characteristic of this model of juvenile T2D, the TallyHO mice were obese and hyperglycemic at an early age (5weeks and 10weeks of age, respectively). The femur mid-shaft of TallyHO mice had higher tissue mineral density and larger cortical area, as determined by micro-computed tomography, compared to the femur mid-shaft of SWR/J mice, irrespective of age. As such, the diabetic rodent bone was structurally stronger than the non-diabetic rodent bone, but the higher peak force endured by the diaphysis during three-point (3pt) bending was not independent of the difference in body weight. Upon accounting for the structure of the femur diaphysis, the estimated toughness at 16weeks and 34weeks was lower for the diabetic mice than for non-diabetic controls, but neither toughness nor estimated material strength and resistance to crack growth (3pt bending of contralateral notched femur) decreased as the duration of hyperglycemia increased. With respect to trabecular bone, there were no differences in the compressive strength of the L6 vertebral strength between diabetic and non-diabetic mice at both ages despite a lower trabecular bone volume for the TallyHO than for the SWR/J mice at 34weeks. Amide I sub-peak ratios as determined by Raman Spectroscopy analysis of the femur diaphysis suggested a difference in collagen structure between diabetic and non-diabetic mice, although there was not a significant difference in matrix pentosidine between the groups. Overall, the fracture resistance of bone in the TallyHO model of T2D did not progressively decrease with increasing duration of hyperglycemia. However, given the variability in hyperglycemia in this model, there were correlations between blood glucose levels and certain structural properties including peak force.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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13 MeSH Terms
Bone Mineral Density of the Radius Predicts All-Cause Mortality in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: Diabetes Heart Study.
Lenchik L, Register TC, Hsu FC, Xu J, Smith SC, Carr JJ, Freedman BI, Bowden DW
(2018) J Clin Densitom 21: 347-354
MeSH Terms: Absorptiometry, Photon, Aged, Bone Density, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Female, Femur Neck, Humans, Longitudinal Studies, Lumbar Vertebrae, Male, Middle Aged, Mortality, Radius, Sex Factors, Thoracic Vertebrae, Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Show Abstract · Added January 10, 2020
This study aimed to determine the association between areal and volumetric bone mineral density (BMD) with all-cause mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Associations between BMD and all-cause mortality were examined in 576 women and 517 men with T2D in the Diabetes Heart Study. Volumetric BMD in the thoracic and lumbar spine was measured with quantitative computed tomography. Areal BMD (aBMD) in the lumbar spine, total hip, femoral neck, ultradistal radius, mid radius, and whole body was measured using dual X-ray absorptiometry. Association of BMD with all-cause mortality was determined using sequential models, stratified by sex: (1) unadjusted; (2) adjusted for age, race, smoking, alcohol, estrogen use; (3) model 2 plus history of cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and coronary artery calcification; (4) model 3 plus lean mass; and (5) model 3 plus fat mass. At baseline, mean age was 61.2 years for women and 62.7 years for men. At mean 11.0 ± 3.7 years' follow-up, 221 (36.4%) women and 238 (43.6%) men were deceased. In women, BMD at all skeletal sites (except spine aBMD and whole body aBMD) was inversely associated with all-cause mortality in the unadjusted model. These associations remained significant in the mid radius (hazard ratio per standard deviation  = 0.79; p = 0.0057) and distal radius (hazard ratio per standard deviation  = 0.76; p = 0.0056) after adjusting for all covariates, including lean mass. In men, volumetric BMD measurements but not aBMD were inversely associated with mortality and only in the unadjusted model. In this longitudinal study, lower baseline aBMD in the radius was associated with increased all-cause mortality in women with T2D, but not men, independent of other risk factors for death.
Copyright © 2017 The International Society for Clinical Densitometry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Remodeling of injectable, low-viscosity polymer/ceramic bone grafts in a sheep femoral defect model.
Talley AD, McEnery MA, Kalpakci KN, Zienkiewicz KJ, Shimko DA, Guelcher SA
(2017) J Biomed Mater Res B Appl Biomater 105: 2333-2343
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bone Remodeling, Bone Substitutes, Ceramics, Femur, Polyesters, Polyurethanes, Sheep
Show Abstract · Added March 25, 2018
Ceramic/polymer composite bone grafts offer the potential advantage of combining the osteoconductivity of ceramic component with the ductility of polymeric component, resulting in a graft that meets many of the desired properties for bone void fillers (BVF). However, the relative contributions of the polymer and ceramic components to bone healing are not well understood. In this study, we compared remodeling of low-viscosity (LV) ceramic/poly(ester urethane) composites to a ceramic BVF control in a sheep femoral condyle plug defect model. LV composites incorporating either ceramic (LV/CM) or allograft bone (LV/A) particles were evaluated. We hypothesized that LV/CM composites which have the advantageous handling properties of injectability, flowability, and settability would heal comparably to the CM control, which was evaluated for up to 2 years to study its long-term degradation properties. Remodeling of LV/CM was comparable to that observed for the CM control, as evidenced by new bone formation on the surface of the ceramic particles. At early time points (4 months), LV/CM composites healed similar to the ceramic clinical control, while LV/A components showed more variable healing due to osteoclast-mediated resorption of the allograft particles. At longer time points (12-15 months), healing of LV/CM composites was more variable due to the nonhomogeneous distribution and lower concentration of the ceramic particles compared to the ceramic clinical control. Resorption of the ceramic particles was almost complete at 2 years. This study highlights the importance of optimizing the loading and distribution of ceramic particles in polymer/ceramic composites to maximize bone healing. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 2333-2343, 2017.
© 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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Prepubertal Di-n-Butyl Phthalate Exposure Alters Sertoli and Leydig Cell Function and Lowers Bone Density in Adult Male Mice.
Bielanowicz A, Johnson RW, Goh H, Moody SC, Poulton IJ, Croce N, Loveland KL, Hedger MP, Sims NA, Itman C
(2016) Endocrinology 157: 2595-603
MeSH Terms: Absorptiometry, Photon, Animals, Bone Density, Dibutyl Phthalate, Femur, Leydig Cells, Luteinizing Hormone, Male, Mice, Plasticizers, Sertoli Cells, Testis, Testosterone, X-Ray Microtomography
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
Phthalate exposure impairs testis development and function; however, whether phthalates affect nonreproductive functions is not well understood. To investigate this, C57BL/6J mice were fed 1-500 mg di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) in corn oil, or vehicle only, daily from 4 to 14 days, after which tissues were collected (prepubertal study). Another group was fed 1-500 mg/kg·d DBP from 4 to 21 days and then maintained untreated until 8 weeks for determination of adult consequences of prepubertal exposure. Bones were assessed by microcomputed tomography and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and T by RIA. DBP exposure decreased prepubertal femur length, marrow volume, and mean moment of inertia. Adult animals exposed prepubertally to low DBP doses had lower bone mineral content and bone mineral density and less lean tissue mass than vehicle-treated animals. Altered dynamics of the emerging Leydig population were found in 14-day-old animals fed 100-500 mg/kg·d DBP. Adult mice had variable testicular T and serum T and LH concentrations after prepubertal exposure and a dose-dependent reduction in cytochrome p450, family 11, subfamily A, polypeptide 1. Insulin-like 3 was detected in Sertoli cells of adult mice administered the highest dose of 500 mg/kg·d DBP prepubertally, a finding supported by the induction of insulin-like 3 expression in TM4 cells exposed to 50 μM, but not 5 μM, DBP. We propose that low-dose DBP exposure is detrimental to bone but that normal bone mineral density/bone mineral content after high-dose DBP exposure reflects changes in testicular somatic cells that confer protection to bones. These findings will fuel concerns that low-dose DBP exposure impacts health beyond the reproductive axis.
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Novel Raman Spectroscopic Biomarkers Indicate That Postyield Damage Denatures Bone's Collagen.
Unal M, Jung H, Akkus O
(2016) J Bone Miner Res 31: 1015-25
MeSH Terms: Animals, Body Size, Bone Density, Calcium, Dietary, Collagen, Femur, Mice, Spectrum Analysis, Raman
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2017
Raman spectroscopy has become a powerful tool in the assessment of bone quality. However, the use of Raman spectroscopy to assess collagen quality in bone is less established than mineral quality. Because postyield mechanical properties of bone are mostly determined by collagen rather than the mineral phase, it is essential to identify new spectroscopic biomarkers that help infer the status of collagen quality. Amide I and amide III bands are uniquely useful for collagen conformational analysis. Thus, the first aim of this work was to identify the regions of amide bands that are sensitive to thermally induced denaturation. Collagen sheets and bone were thermally denatured to identify spectral measures that change significantly following denaturation. The second aim was to assess whether mechanical damage denatures the collagen phase of bone, as reflected by the molecular spectroscopic biomarkers identified in the first aim. The third aim was to assess the correlation between these new spectroscopic biomarkers and postyield mechanical properties of cortical bone. Our results revealed five peaks whose intensities were sensitive to thermal and mechanical denaturation: ∼1245, ∼1270, and ∼1320 cm(-1) in the amide III band, and ∼1640 and ∼1670 cm(-1) in the amide I band. Four peak intensity ratios derived from these peaks were found to be sensitive to denaturation: 1670/1640, 1320/1454, 1245/1270, and 1245/1454. Among these four spectral biomarkers, only 1670/1640 displayed significant correlation with all postyield mechanical properties. The overall results showed that these peak intensity ratios can be used as novel spectroscopic biomarkers to assess collagen quality and integrity. The changes in these ratios with denaturation may reflect alterations in the collagen secondary structure, specifically a transition from ordered to less-ordered structure. The overall results clearly demonstrate that this new spectral information, specifically the ratio of 1670/1640, can be used to understand the involvement of collagen quality in the fragility of bone. © 2015 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.
© 2015 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.
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8 MeSH Terms
Age-related changes in the fracture resistance of male Fischer F344 rat bone.
Uppuganti S, Granke M, Makowski AJ, Does MD, Nyman JS
(2016) Bone 83: 220-232
MeSH Terms: Aging, Animals, Biomechanical Phenomena, Body Weight, Bone and Bones, Femur, Finite Element Analysis, Fractures, Bone, Lumbar Vertebrae, Male, Porosity, Radius, Rats, Inbred F344, Spectrum Analysis, Raman, X-Ray Microtomography
Show Abstract · Added November 30, 2015
In addition to the loss in bone volume that occurs with age, there is a decline in material properties. To test new therapies or diagnostic tools that target such properties as material strength and toughness, a pre-clinical model of aging would be useful in which changes in bone are similar to those that occur with aging in humans. Toward that end, we hypothesized that similar to human bone, the estimated toughness and material strength of cortical bone at the apparent-level decreases with age in the male Fischer F344 rat. In addition, we tested whether the known decline in trabecular architecture in rats translated to an age-related decrease in vertebra (VB) strength and whether non-X-ray techniques could quantify tissue changes at micron and sub-micron length scales. Bones were harvested from 6-, 12-, and 24-month (mo.) old rats (n=12 per age). Despite a loss in trabecular bone with age, VB compressive strength was similar among the age groups. Similarly, whole-bone strength (peak force) in bending was maintained (femur) or increased (radius) with aging. There was though an age-related decrease in post-yield toughness (radius) and bending strength (femur). The ability to resist crack initiation was actually higher for the 12-mo. and 24-mo. than for 6-mo. rats (notch femur), but the estimated work to propagate the crack was less for the aged bone. For the femur diaphysis region, porosity increased while bound water decreased with age. For the radius diaphysis, there was an age-related increase in non-enzymatic and mature enzymatic collagen crosslinks. Raman spectroscopy analysis of embedded cross-sections of the tibia mid-shaft detected an increase in carbonate subsitution with advanced aging for both inner and outer tissue.
Published by Elsevier Inc.
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15 MeSH Terms
Raloxifene improves skeletal properties in an animal model of cystic chronic kidney disease.
Newman CL, Creecy A, Granke M, Nyman JS, Tian N, Hammond MA, Wallace JM, Brown DM, Chen N, Moe SM, Allen MR
(2016) Kidney Int 89: 95-104
MeSH Terms: Animals, Blood Urea Nitrogen, Bone Density Conservation Agents, Bone Remodeling, Collagen, Disease Models, Animal, Femur, Male, Mechanical Phenomena, Parathyroid Hormone, Polycystic Kidney, Autosomal Dominant, Raloxifene Hydrochloride, Rats, Renal Insufficiency, Chronic, Spine
Show Abstract · Added November 23, 2015
Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have an increased risk of fracture. Raloxifene is a mild antiresorptive agent that reduces fracture risk in the general population. Here we assessed the impact of raloxifene on the skeletal properties of animals with progressive CKD. Male Cy/+ rats that develop autosomal dominant cystic kidney disease were treated with either vehicle or raloxifene for five weeks. They were assessed for changes in mineral metabolism and skeletal parameters (microCT, histology, whole-bone mechanics, and material properties). Their normal littermates served as controls. Animals with CKD had significantly higher parathyroid hormone levels compared with normal controls, as well as inferior structural and mechanical skeletal properties. Raloxifene treatment resulted in lower bone remodeling rates and higher cancellous bone volume in the rats with CKD. Although it had little effect on cortical bone geometry, it resulted in higher energy to fracture and modulus of toughness values than vehicle-treated rats with CKD, achieving levels equivalent to normal controls. Animals treated with raloxifene had superior tissue-level mechanical properties as assessed by nanoindentation, and higher collagen D-periodic spacing as assessed by atomic force microscopy. Thus, raloxifene can positively impact whole-bone mechanical properties in CKD through its impact on skeletal material properties.
Copyright © 2015 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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15 MeSH Terms
Glycoprotein130 (Gp130)/interleukin-6 (IL-6) signalling in osteoclasts promotes bone formation in periosteal and trabecular bone.
Johnson RW, McGregor NE, Brennan HJ, Crimeen-Irwin B, Poulton IJ, Martin TJ, Sims NA
(2015) Bone 81: 343-351
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bone Marrow, Bone Marrow Cells, Bone and Bones, Cartilage, Cathepsin K, Cytokine Receptor gp130, Female, Femur, Gene Deletion, Interleukin-6, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Osteoclasts, Osteogenesis, Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction, Receptors, Interleukin-11, Receptors, Interleukin-6, Sex Factors, Signal Transduction, X-Ray Microtomography
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-11 (IL-11) receptors (IL-6R and IL-11R, respectively) are both expressed in osteoclasts and transduce signal via the glycoprotein130 (gp130) co-receptor, but the physiological role of this pathway is unclear. To determine the critical roles of gp130 signalling in the osteoclast, we generated mice using cathepsin K Cre (CtskCre) to disrupt gp130 signalling in osteoclasts. Bone marrow macrophages from CtskCre.gp130(f/f) mice generated more osteoclasts in vitro than cells from CtskCre.gp130(w/w) mice; these osteoclasts were also larger and had more nuclei than controls. While no increase in osteoclast numbers was observed in vivo, osteoclasts on trabecular bone surfaces of CtskCre.gp130(f/f) mice were more spread out than in control mice, but had no functional defect detectable by serum CTX1 levels or trabecular bone cartilage remnants. However, trabecular osteoblast number and mineralising surfaces were significantly lower in male CtskCre.gp130(f/f) mice compared to controls, and this was associated with a significantly lower trabecular bone volume at 12 weeks of age. Furthermore, CtskCre.gp130(f/f) mice exhibited greatly suppressed periosteal bone formation at this age, indicated by significant reductions in both double-labelled surface and mineral apposition rate. By 26 weeks of age, CtskCre.gp130(f/f) mice exhibited narrower femora, with lower periosteal and endocortical perimeters than CtskCre.gp130(w/w) controls. Since IL-6 and IL-11R global knockout mice exhibited a similar reduction in femoral width, we also assessed periosteal bone formation in those strains, and found bone forming surfaces were also reduced in male IL-6 null mice. These data suggest that IL-6/gp130 signalling in the osteoclast is not essential for normal bone resorption in vivo, but maintains both trabecular and periosteal bone formation in male mice by promoting osteoblast activity through the stimulation of osteoclast-derived "coupling factors" and "osteotransmitters", respectively.
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Raman spectral classification of mineral- and collagen-bound water's associations to elastic and post-yield mechanical properties of cortical bone.
Unal M, Akkus O
(2015) Bone 81: 315-326
MeSH Terms: Animals, Biomechanical Phenomena, Bone Density, Cattle, Collagen, Elasticity, Femur, Porosity, Protein Binding, Spectrum Analysis, Raman, Water
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2017
Water that is bound to bone's matrix is implied as a predictor of fracture resistance; however, bound water is an elusive variable to be measured nondestructively. To date, the only nondestructive method used for studying bone hydration status is magnetic resonance variants (NMR or MRI). For the first time, bone hydration status was studied by short-wave infrared (SWIR) Raman spectroscopy to investigate associations of mineral-bound and collagen-bound water compartments with mechanical properties. Thirty cortical bone samples were used for quantitative Raman-based water analysis, gravimetric analysis, porosity measurement, and biomechanical testing. A sequential dehydration protocol was developed to replace unbound (heat drying) and bound (ethanol treatment) water in bone. Raman spectra were collected serially to track the OH-stretch band during dehydration. Four previously identified peaks were investigated: I3220/I2949, I3325/I2949 and I3453/I2949 reflect status of organic-matrix related water (mostly collagen-related water) compartments and collagen portion of bone while I3584/I2949 reflects status of mineral-related water compartments and mineral portion of bone. These spectroscopic biomarkers were correlated with elastic and post-yield mechanical properties of bone. Collagen-water related biomarkers (I3220/I2949 and I3325/I2949) correlated significantly and positively with toughness (R(2)=0.81 and R(2)=0.79; p<0.001) and post-yield toughness (R(2)=0.65 and R(2)=0.73; p<0.001). Mineral-water related biomarker correlated significantly and negatively with elastic modulus (R(2)=0.78; p<0.001) and positively with strength (R(2)=0.46; p<0.001). While MR-based techniques have been useful in measuring unbound and bound water, this is the first study which probed bound-water compartments differentially for collagen and mineral-bound water. For the first time, we showed an evidence for contributions of different bound-water compartments to mechanical properties of wet bone and the reported correlations of Raman-based water measurements to mechanical properties underline the necessity for enabling approaches to assess these new biomarkers noninvasively in vivo to improve the current diagnosis of those who may be at risk of bone fracture due to aging and diseases.
Published by Elsevier Inc.
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D-amino acid inhibits biofilm but not new bone formation in an ovine model.
Harmata AJ, Ma Y, Sanchez CJ, Zienkiewicz KJ, Elefteriou F, Wenke JC, Guelcher SA
(2015) Clin Orthop Relat Res 473: 3951-61
MeSH Terms: Amino Acids, Animals, Anti-Bacterial Agents, Biofilms, Biomarkers, Bone Transplantation, Cell Differentiation, Cell Proliferation, Cells, Cultured, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Female, Femur, Mesenchymal Stem Cells, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Methionine, Mice, Models, Animal, Osseointegration, Osteoblasts, Osteoclasts, Osteogenesis, Phenylalanine, Proline, Sheep, Domestic, Time Factors, X-Ray Microtomography
Show Abstract · Added May 16, 2017
BACKGROUND - Infectious complications of musculoskeletal trauma are an important factor contributing to patient morbidity. Biofilm-dispersive bone grafts augmented with D-amino acids (D-AAs) prevent biofilm formation in vitro and in vivo, but the effects of D-AAs on osteocompatibility and new bone formation have not been investigated.
QUESTIONS/PURPOSES - We asked: (1) Do D-AAs hinder osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation in vitro? (2) Does local delivery of D-AAs from low-viscosity bone grafts inhibit new bone formation in a large-animal model?
METHODS - Methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S aureus clinical isolates, mouse bone marrow stromal cells, and osteoclast precursor cells were treated with an equal mass (1:1:1) mixture of D-Pro:D-Met:D-Phe. The effects of the D-AA dose on biofilm inhibition (n = 4), biofilm dispersion (n = 4), and bone marrow stromal cell proliferation (n = 3) were quantitatively measured by crystal violet staining. Osteoblast differentiation was quantitatively assessed by alkaline phosphatase staining, von Kossa staining, and quantitative reverse transcription for the osteogenic factors a1Col1 and Ocn (n = 3). Osteoclast differentiation was quantitatively measured by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining (n = 3). Bone grafts augmented with 0 or 200 mmol/L D-AAs were injected in ovine femoral condyle defects in four sheep. New bone formation was evaluated by μCT and histology 4 months later. An a priori power analysis indicated that a sample size of four would detect a 7.5% difference of bone volume/total volume between groups assuming a mean and SD of 30% and 5%, respectively, with a power of 80% and an alpha level of 0.05 using a two-tailed t-test between the means of two independent samples.
RESULTS - Bone marrow stromal cell proliferation, osteoblast differentiation, and osteoclast differentiation were inhibited at D-AAs concentrations of 27 mmol/L or greater in a dose-responsive manner in vitro (p < 0.05). In methicillin-sensitive and methicillin-resistant S aureus clinical isolates, D-AAs inhibited biofilm formation at concentrations of 13.5 mmol/L or greater in vitro (p < 0.05). Local delivery of D-AAs from low-viscosity grafts did not inhibit new bone formation in a large-animal model pilot study (0 mmol/L D-AAs: bone volume/total volume = 26.9% ± 4.1%; 200 mmol/L D-AAs: bone volume/total volume = 28.3% ± 15.4%; mean difference with 95% CI = -1.4; p = 0.13).
CONCLUSIONS - D-AAs inhibit biofilm formation, bone marrow stromal cell proliferation, osteoblast differentiation, and osteoclast differentiation in vitro in a dose-responsive manner. Local delivery of D-AAs from bone grafts did not inhibit new bone formation in vivo at clinically relevant doses.
CLINICAL RELEVANCE - Local delivery of D-AAs is an effective antibiofilm strategy that does not appear to inhibit bone repair. Longitudinal studies investigating bacterial burden, bone formation, and bone remodeling in contaminated defects as a function of D-AA dose are required to further support the use of D-AAs in the clinical management of infected open fractures.
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26 MeSH Terms