Other search tools

About this data

The publication data currently available has been vetted by Vanderbilt faculty, staff, administrators and trainees. The data itself is retrieved directly from NCBI's PubMed and is automatically updated on a weekly basis to ensure accuracy and completeness.

If you have any questions or comments, please contact us.

Results: 1 to 10 of 11850

Publication Record

Connections

Genome-wide association and transcriptome studies identify target genes and risk loci for breast cancer.
Ferreira MA, Gamazon ER, Al-Ejeh F, Aittomäki K, Andrulis IL, Anton-Culver H, Arason A, Arndt V, Aronson KJ, Arun BK, Asseryanis E, Azzollini J, Balmaña J, Barnes DR, Barrowdale D, Beckmann MW, Behrens S, Benitez J, Bermisheva M, Białkowska K, Blomqvist C, Bogdanova NV, Bojesen SE, Bolla MK, Borg A, Brauch H, Brenner H, Broeks A, Burwinkel B, Caldés T, Caligo MA, Campa D, Campbell I, Canzian F, Carter J, Carter BD, Castelao JE, Chang-Claude J, Chanock SJ, Christiansen H, Chung WK, Claes KBM, Clarke CL, EMBRACE Collaborators, GC-HBOC Study Collaborators, GEMO Study Collaborators, Couch FJ, Cox A, Cross SS, Czene K, Daly MB, de la Hoya M, Dennis J, Devilee P, Diez O, Dörk T, Dunning AM, Dwek M, Eccles DM, Ejlertsen B, Ellberg C, Engel C, Eriksson M, Fasching PA, Fletcher O, Flyger H, Friedman E, Frost D, Gabrielson M, Gago-Dominguez M, Ganz PA, Gapstur SM, Garber J, García-Closas M, García-Sáenz JA, Gaudet MM, Giles GG, Glendon G, Godwin AK, Goldberg MS, Goldgar DE, González-Neira A, Greene MH, Gronwald J, Guénel P, Haiman CA, Hall P, Hamann U, He W, Heyworth J, Hogervorst FBL, Hollestelle A, Hoover RN, Hopper JL, Hulick PJ, Humphreys K, Imyanitov EN, ABCTB Investigators, HEBON Investigators, BCFR Investigators, Isaacs C, Jakimovska M, Jakubowska A, James PA, Janavicius R, Jankowitz RC, John EM, Johnson N, Joseph V, Karlan BY, Khusnutdinova E, Kiiski JI, Ko YD, Jones ME, Konstantopoulou I, Kristensen VN, Laitman Y, Lambrechts D, Lazaro C, Leslie G, Lester J, Lesueur F, Lindström S, Long J, Loud JT, Lubiński J, Makalic E, Mannermaa A, Manoochehri M, Margolin S, Maurer T, Mavroudis D, McGuffog L, Meindl A, Menon U, Michailidou K, Miller A, Montagna M, Moreno F, Moserle L, Mulligan AM, Nathanson KL, Neuhausen SL, Nevanlinna H, Nevelsteen I, Nielsen FC, Nikitina-Zake L, Nussbaum RL, Offit K, Olah E, Olopade OI, Olsson H, Osorio A, Papp J, Park-Simon TW, Parsons MT, Pedersen IS, Peixoto A, Peterlongo P, Pharoah PDP, Plaseska-Karanfilska D, Poppe B, Presneau N, Radice P, Rantala J, Rennert G, Risch HA, Saloustros E, Sanden K, Sawyer EJ, Schmidt MK, Schmutzler RK, Sharma P, Shu XO, Simard J, Singer CF, Soucy P, Southey MC, Spinelli JJ, Spurdle AB, Stone J, Swerdlow AJ, Tapper WJ, Taylor JA, Teixeira MR, Terry MB, Teulé A, Thomassen M, Thöne K, Thull DL, Tischkowitz M, Toland AE, Torres D, Truong T, Tung N, Vachon CM, van Asperen CJ, van den Ouweland AMW, van Rensburg EJ, Vega A, Viel A, Wang Q, Wappenschmidt B, Weitzel JN, Wendt C, Winqvist R, Yang XR, Yannoukakos D, Ziogas A, Kraft P, Antoniou AC, Zheng W, Easton DF, Milne RL, Beesley J, Chenevix-Trench G
(2019) Nat Commun 10: 1741
MeSH Terms: Breast Neoplasms, Female, Gene Expression Profiling, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genome-Wide Association Study, Humans, Quantitative Trait Loci
Show Abstract · Added July 17, 2019
Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 170 breast cancer susceptibility loci. Here we hypothesize that some risk-associated variants might act in non-breast tissues, specifically adipose tissue and immune cells from blood and spleen. Using expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) reported in these tissues, we identify 26 previously unreported, likely target genes of overall breast cancer risk variants, and 17 for estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer, several with a known immune function. We determine the directional effect of gene expression on disease risk measured based on single and multiple eQTL. In addition, using a gene-based test of association that considers eQTL from multiple tissues, we identify seven (and four) regions with variants associated with overall (and ER-negative) breast cancer risk, which were not reported in previous GWAS. Further investigation of the function of the implicated genes in breast and immune cells may provide insights into the etiology of breast cancer.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
MeSH Terms
Aberrant FGFR signaling mediates resistance to CDK4/6 inhibitors in ER+ breast cancer.
Formisano L, Lu Y, Servetto A, Hanker AB, Jansen VM, Bauer JA, Sudhan DR, Guerrero-Zotano AL, Croessmann S, Guo Y, Ericsson PG, Lee KM, Nixon MJ, Schwarz LJ, Sanders ME, Dugger TC, Cruz MR, Behdad A, Cristofanilli M, Bardia A, O'Shaughnessy J, Nagy RJ, Lanman RB, Solovieff N, He W, Miller M, Su F, Shyr Y, Mayer IA, Balko JM, Arteaga CL
(2019) Nat Commun 10: 1373
MeSH Terms: Aminopyridines, Animals, Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal, Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols, Breast Neoplasms, Circulating Tumor DNA, Cyclin D1, Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 4, Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 6, Drug Resistance, Neoplasm, Female, Fulvestrant, High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing, Humans, MCF-7 Cells, Mice, Mutation, Naphthalenes, Piperazines, Progression-Free Survival, Proportional Hazards Models, Protein Kinase Inhibitors, Purines, Pyrazoles, Pyridines, Quinolines, Quinoxalines, Receptor, Fibroblast Growth Factor, Type 1, Receptor, Fibroblast Growth Factor, Type 2, Receptors, Estrogen, Signal Transduction, Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
Show Abstract · Added April 2, 2019
Using an ORF kinome screen in MCF-7 cells treated with the CDK4/6 inhibitor ribociclib plus fulvestrant, we identified FGFR1 as a mechanism of drug resistance. FGFR1-amplified/ER+ breast cancer cells and MCF-7 cells transduced with FGFR1 were resistant to fulvestrant ± ribociclib or palbociclib. This resistance was abrogated by treatment with the FGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) lucitanib. Addition of the FGFR TKI erdafitinib to palbociclib/fulvestrant induced complete responses of FGFR1-amplified/ER+ patient-derived-xenografts. Next generation sequencing of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in 34 patients after progression on CDK4/6 inhibitors identified FGFR1/2 amplification or activating mutations in 14/34 (41%) post-progression specimens. Finally, ctDNA from patients enrolled in MONALEESA-2, the registration trial of ribociclib, showed that patients with FGFR1 amplification exhibited a shorter progression-free survival compared to patients with wild type FGFR1. Thus, we propose breast cancers with FGFR pathway alterations should be considered for trials using combinations of ER, CDK4/6 and FGFR antagonists.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
32 MeSH Terms
Preparation, preliminary pharmacokinetic and brain targeting study of metformin encapsulated W/O/W composite submicron emulsions promoted by borneol.
Hong L, Li X, Bao Y, Duvall CL, Zhang C, Chen W, Peng C
(2019) Eur J Pharm Sci 133: 160-166
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bornanes, Brain, Drug Compounding, Drug Delivery Systems, Drug Liberation, Emulsions, Female, Hypoglycemic Agents, Male, Metformin, Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2019
Metformin hydrochloride (Met) is the first-line drug to treat type 2 diabetes and has shown high efficiency in reducing Alzheimer's disease in recent studies. Herein, a borneol W/O/W composite submicron emulsion containing Met (B-Met-W/O/W SE) was prepared, expecting longer in-vivo circulation time, better bioavailability and brain targeting of Met drug. In the optimized formulation, the mean droplets size, polydispersity index and encapsulation efficiency of the composite were 386.5 nm, 0.219 and 87.26%, respectively. FTIR analysis confirmed that Met interacted with carriers in B-Met-W/O/W SE. Compared with Met free drug, in-vitro release of Met in B-Met-W/O/W SE delivery system was much slower. In pharmacokinetic studies in rats, the AUC, MRT and t of the B-Met-W/O/W SE system were respectively 1.27, 2.49 and 4.02-fold higher than Met free drug system. The drug-targeting index of B-Met-W/O/W SE system to the brain tissue was also higher than that of Met free drug system and Met-W/O/W SE system. These results indicated that B-Met-W/O/W SE drug delivery system is a promising candidate in treating clinical Alzheimer's disease.
Copyright © 2019 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
12 MeSH Terms
Rabbit Model of Intra-Arterial Chemotherapy Toxicity Demonstrates Retinopathy and Vasculopathy Related to Drug and Dose, Not Procedure or Approach.
Daniels AB, Froehler MT, Nunnally AH, Pierce JM, Bozic I, Stone CA, Santapuram PR, Tao YK, Boyd KL, Himmel LE, Chen SC, Du L, Friedman DL, Richmond A
(2019) Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 60: 954-964
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antineoplastic Agents, Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating, Carboplatin, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Electroretinography, Female, Fluorescein Angiography, Humans, Infant, Infusions, Intra-Arterial, Male, Melphalan, Models, Animal, Ophthalmic Artery, Rabbits, Retina, Retinal Diseases, Retinal Neoplasms, Retinal Vessels, Retinoblastoma, Retrospective Studies, Tomography, Optical Coherence
Show Abstract · Added July 29, 2019
Purpose - To use our intra-arterial chemotherapy (IAC) rabbit model to assess the impact of IAC procedure, drug, dose, and choice of technique on ocular structure and function, to study the nature and etiology of IAC toxicity, and to compare to observations in patients.
Methods - Rabbits received IAC melphalan (0.4-0.8 mg/kg), carboplatin (25-50 mg), or saline, either by direct ophthalmic artery cannulation, or with a technique emulating nonocclusion. Ocular structure/function were assessed with examination, electroretinography (ERG), fundus photography, fluorescein angiography, optical coherence tomography (OCT), and OCT angiography, prior to and 5 to 6 weeks after IAC. Blood counts were obtained weekly. We reviewed our last 50 IAC treatments in patients for evidence of ocular or systemic complications.
Results - No toxicity was seen in the saline control group. With standard (0.4 mg/kg) melphalan, no vascular/microvascular abnormalities were seen with either technique. However, severe microvascular pruning and arteriolar occlusions were seen occasionally at 0.8 mg/kg doses. ERG reductions were dose-dependent. Histology showed melphalan dose-dependent degeneration in all retinal layers, restricted geographically to areas of greatest vascular density. Carboplatin caused massive edema of ocular/periocular structures. IAC patients experienced occasional periocular swelling/rash, and only rarely experienced retinopathy or vascular events/hemorrhage in eyes treated multiple times with triple (melphalan/carboplatin/topotecan) therapy. Transient neutropenia occurred after 46% of IAC procedures, generally after triple therapy.
Conclusions - IAC toxicity appears to be related to the specific drug being used and is dose-dependent, rather than related to the IAC procedure itself or the specific technique selected. These rabbit findings are corroborated by our clinical findings in patients.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
23 MeSH Terms
Characterization of the hemodynamic response function in white matter tracts for event-related fMRI.
Li M, Newton AT, Anderson AW, Ding Z, Gore JC
(2019) Nat Commun 10: 1140
MeSH Terms: Adult, Cerebral Cortex, Cerebrovascular Circulation, Female, Gray Matter, Healthy Volunteers, Hemodynamics, Hemoglobins, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Nerve Net, Oxygen, Pattern Recognition, Visual, Stroop Test, White Matter
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
Accurate estimates of the BOLD hemodynamic response function (HRF) are crucial for the interpretation and analysis of event-related functional MRI data. To date, however, there have been no comprehensive measurements of the HRF in white matter (WM) despite increasing evidence that BOLD signals in WM change after a stimulus. We performed an event-related cognitive task (Stroop color-word interference) to measure the HRF in selected human WM pathways. The task was chosen in order to produce robust, distributed centers of activity throughout the cortex. To measure the HRF in WM, fiber tracts were reconstructed between each pair of activated cortical areas. We observed clear task-specific HRFs with reduced magnitudes, delayed onsets and prolonged initial dips in WM tracts compared with activated grey matter, thus calling for significant changes to current standard models for accurately characterizing the HRFs in WM and for modifications of standard methods of analysis of functional imaging data.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
16 MeSH Terms
High frequency of shared clonotypes in human B cell receptor repertoires.
Soto C, Bombardi RG, Branchizio A, Kose N, Matta P, Sevy AM, Sinkovits RS, Gilchuk P, Finn JA, Crowe JE
(2019) Nature 566: 398-402
MeSH Terms: Adult, Amino Acid Sequence, Antibodies, Antigens, B-Lymphocytes, Base Sequence, Clone Cells, Female, Fetal Blood, Healthy Volunteers, Humans, Infant, Newborn, Male, Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell, Sequence Analysis, DNA
Show Abstract · Added March 31, 2019
The human genome contains approximately 20 thousand protein-coding genes, but the size of the collection of antigen receptors of the adaptive immune system that is generated by the recombination of gene segments with non-templated junctional additions (on B cells) is unknown-although it is certainly orders of magnitude larger. It has not been established whether individuals possess unique (or private) repertoires or substantial components of shared (or public) repertoires. Here we sequence recombined and expressed B cell receptor genes in several individuals to determine the size of their B cell receptor repertoires, and the extent to which these are shared between individuals. Our experiments revealed that the circulating repertoire of each individual contained between 9 and 17 million B cell clonotypes. The three individuals that we studied shared many clonotypes, including between 1 and 6% of B cell heavy-chain clonotypes shared between two subjects (0.3% of clonotypes shared by all three) and 20 to 34% of λ or κ light chains shared between two subjects (16 or 22% of λ or κ light chains, respectively, were shared by all three). Some of the B cell clonotypes had thousands of clones, or somatic variants, within the clonotype lineage. Although some of these shared lineages might be driven by exposure to common antigens, previous exposure to foreign antigens was not the only force that shaped the shared repertoires, as we also identified shared clonotypes in umbilical cord blood samples and all adult repertoires. The unexpectedly high prevalence of shared clonotypes in B cell repertoires, and identification of the sequences of these shared clonotypes, should enable better understanding of the role of B cell immune repertoires in health and disease.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
15 MeSH Terms
Functionally oriented analysis of cardiometabolic traits in a trans-ethnic sample.
Petty LE, Highland HM, Gamazon ER, Hu H, Karhade M, Chen HH, de Vries PS, Grove ML, Aguilar D, Bell GI, Huff CD, Hanis CL, Doddapaneni H, Munzy DM, Gibbs RA, Ma J, Parra EJ, Cruz M, Valladares-Salgado A, Arking DE, Barbeira A, Im HK, Morrison AC, Boerwinkle E, Below JE
(2019) Hum Mol Genet 28: 1212-1224
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Blood Pressure, Body Mass Index, Chromosome Mapping, Ethnic Groups, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Forecasting, Genetic Association Studies, Genome-Wide Association Study, Humans, Male, Metabolome, Middle Aged, Multifactorial Inheritance, Phenotype, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Transcriptome
Show Abstract · Added February 15, 2019
Interpretation of genetic association results is difficult because signals often lack biological context. To generate hypotheses of the functional genetic etiology of complex cardiometabolic traits, we estimated the genetically determined component of gene expression from common variants using PrediXcan (1) and determined genes with differential predicted expression by trait. PrediXcan imputes tissue-specific expression levels from genetic variation using variant-level effect on gene expression in transcriptome data. To explore the value of imputed genetically regulated gene expression (GReX) models across different ancestral populations, we evaluated imputed expression levels for predictive accuracy genome-wide in RNA sequence data in samples drawn from European-ancestry and African-ancestry populations and identified substantial predictive power using European-derived models in a non-European target population. We then tested the association of GReX on 15 cardiometabolic traits including blood lipid levels, body mass index, height, blood pressure, fasting glucose and insulin, RR interval, fibrinogen level, factor VII level and white blood cell and platelet counts in 15 755 individuals across three ancestry groups, resulting in 20 novel gene-phenotype associations reaching experiment-wide significance across ancestries. In addition, we identified 18 significant novel gene-phenotype associations in our ancestry-specific analyses. Top associations were assessed for additional support via query of S-PrediXcan (2) results derived from publicly available genome-wide association studies summary data. Collectively, these findings illustrate the utility of transcriptome-based imputation models for discovery of cardiometabolic effect genes in a diverse dataset.
© The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
19 MeSH Terms
Trans-ethnic association study of blood pressure determinants in over 750,000 individuals.
Giri A, Hellwege JN, Keaton JM, Park J, Qiu C, Warren HR, Torstenson ES, Kovesdy CP, Sun YV, Wilson OD, Robinson-Cohen C, Roumie CL, Chung CP, Birdwell KA, Damrauer SM, DuVall SL, Klarin D, Cho K, Wang Y, Evangelou E, Cabrera CP, Wain LV, Shrestha R, Mautz BS, Akwo EA, Sargurupremraj M, Debette S, Boehnke M, Scott LJ, Luan J, Zhao JH, Willems SM, Thériault S, Shah N, Oldmeadow C, Almgren P, Li-Gao R, Verweij N, Boutin TS, Mangino M, Ntalla I, Feofanova E, Surendran P, Cook JP, Karthikeyan S, Lahrouchi N, Liu C, Sepúlveda N, Richardson TG, Kraja A, Amouyel P, Farrall M, Poulter NR, Understanding Society Scientific Group, International Consortium for Blood Pressure, Blood Pressure-International Consortium of Exome Chip Studies, Laakso M, Zeggini E, Sever P, Scott RA, Langenberg C, Wareham NJ, Conen D, Palmer CNA, Attia J, Chasman DI, Ridker PM, Melander O, Mook-Kanamori DO, Harst PV, Cucca F, Schlessinger D, Hayward C, Spector TD, Jarvelin MR, Hennig BJ, Timpson NJ, Wei WQ, Smith JC, Xu Y, Matheny ME, Siew EE, Lindgren C, Herzig KH, Dedoussis G, Denny JC, Psaty BM, Howson JMM, Munroe PB, Newton-Cheh C, Caulfield MJ, Elliott P, Gaziano JM, Concato J, Wilson PWF, Tsao PS, Velez Edwards DR, Susztak K, Million Veteran Program, O'Donnell CJ, Hung AM, Edwards TL
(2019) Nat Genet 51: 51-62
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Animals, Blood Pressure, Ethnic Groups, Female, Gene Expression, Genome-Wide Association Study, Humans, Kidney Tubules, Male, Mice, Middle Aged, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Transcriptome, Up-Regulation
Show Abstract · Added January 3, 2019
In this trans-ethnic multi-omic study, we reinterpret the genetic architecture of blood pressure to identify genes, tissues, phenomes and medication contexts of blood pressure homeostasis. We discovered 208 novel common blood pressure SNPs and 53 rare variants in genome-wide association studies of systolic, diastolic and pulse pressure in up to 776,078 participants from the Million Veteran Program (MVP) and collaborating studies, with analysis of the blood pressure clinical phenome in MVP. Our transcriptome-wide association study detected 4,043 blood pressure associations with genetically predicted gene expression of 840 genes in 45 tissues, and mouse renal single-cell RNA sequencing identified upregulated blood pressure genes in kidney tubule cells.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
15 MeSH Terms
Association Between Regional Adipose Tissue Distribution and Risk of Heart Failure Among Blacks.
Pandey A, Kondamudi N, Patel KV, Ayers C, Simek S, Hall ME, Musani SK, Blackshear C, Mentz RJ, Khan H, Terry JG, Correa A, Butler J, Neeland IJ, Berry JD
(2018) Circ Heart Fail 11: e005629
MeSH Terms: Adiposity, African Americans, Aged, Female, Heart Failure, Humans, Intra-Abdominal Fat, Male, Middle Aged, Obesity, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, Tissue Distribution
Show Abstract · Added April 3, 2019
BACKGROUND - Obesity is highly prevalent among blacks and is associated with a greater risk of heart failure (HF). However, the contribution of regional adiposity depots such as visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue toward risk of HF in blacks is unknown.
METHODS AND RESULTS - We included 2602 participants (mean age: 59 years, 35% men) from the Jackson Heart Study without prevalent HF who underwent computed tomography quantification of VAT and subcutaneous adipose tissue during the second visit (2005-2009). The associations between different adiposity measures and HF were evaluated using adjusted Cox models. There were 122 incident HF events over a median follow-up of 7.1 years. Higher amounts of VAT were associated with greater risk of HF in age- and sex-adjusted analyses (hazard ratio [95% CI] per 1-SD higher VAT: 1.29 [1.09-1.52]). This association was attenuated and not significant after additional adjustment for traditional HF risk factors and body mass index. Overall obesity, represented by body mass index, was associated with higher risk of HF independent of risk factors and VAT (hazard ratio [95% CI] per 1-kg/m higher body mass index: 1.06 [1.02-1.11]). Subcutaneous adipose tissue was not associated with risk of HF in adjusted analyses.
CONCLUSIONS - In a community-dwelling black population, higher amounts of overall and visceral adiposity are associated with higher risk of HF. The association between VAT and HF risk in blacks may reflect differences in traditional HF risk factor burden. Future studies are needed to confirm this observation and clarify the independent role of different measures of adiposity on HF outcomes.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
13 MeSH Terms
Tissue-Specific Differential Expression of Novel Genes and Long Intergenic Noncoding RNAs in Humans With Extreme Response to Evoked Endotoxemia.
Ferguson JF, Xue C, Gao Y, Tian T, Shi J, Zhang X, Wang Y, Li YD, Wei Z, Li M, Zhang H, Reilly MP
(2018) Circ Genom Precis Med 11: e001907
MeSH Terms: Adipose Tissue, Animals, Endotoxemia, Female, Gene Expression Regulation, Genome-Wide Association Study, Humans, Immunity, Innate, Inflammation, Male, Mice, Monocytes, RNA, Long Noncoding, RNA, Messenger, Sequence Analysis, RNA
Show Abstract · Added April 2, 2019
BACKGROUND - Cytokine responses to activation of innate immunity differ between individuals, yet the genomic and tissue-specific transcriptomic determinants of inflammatory responsiveness are not well understood. We hypothesized that tissue-specific mRNA and long intergenic noncoding RNA (lincRNA) induction differs between individuals with divergent evoked inflammatory responses.
METHODS - In the GENE Study (Genetics of Evoked Response to Niacin and Endotoxemia), we performed an inpatient endotoxin challenge (1 ng/kg lipopolysaccharide [LPS]) in healthy humans. We selected individuals in the top (high responders) and bottom (low responders) extremes of inflammatory responses and applied RNA sequencing to CD14 monocytes (N=15) and adipose tissue (N=25) before and after LPS administration.
RESULTS - Although only a small number of genes were differentially expressed at baseline, there were clear differences in the magnitude of the transcriptional response post-LPS between high and low responders, with a far greater number of genes differentially expressed by endotoxemia in high responders. Furthermore, tissue responses differed during inflammation, and we found a number of tissue-specific differentially expressed lincRNAs post-LPS, which we validated. Relative to nondifferentially expressed lincRNAs, differentially expressed lincRNAs were equally likely to be nonconserved as conserved between human and mouse, indicating that conservation is not a predictor of lincRNAs associated with human inflammatory pathophysiology. Differentially expressed genes also were enriched for signals with inflammatory and cardiometabolic disease in published genome-wide association studies. CTB-41I6.2 ( AC002091.1), a nonconserved human-specific lincRNA, is one of the top lincRNAs regulated by endotoxemia in monocytes, but not in adipose tissue. Knockdown experiments in THP-1 monocytes suggest that this lincRNA enhances LPS-induced interleukin 6 ( IL6) expression in monocytes, and we now refer to this as monocyte LPS-induced lincRNA regulator of IL6 ( MOLRIL6).
CONCLUSIONS - We highlight mRNAs and lincRNAs that represent novel candidates for modulation of innate immune and metabolic responses in humans.
CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION - URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov . Unique identifier: NCT00953667.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
15 MeSH Terms