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Maternal microbial molecules affect offspring health.
Ferguson J
(2020) Science 367: 978-979
MeSH Terms: Animals, Child, Child Health, Diet, High-Fat, Female, Gastrointestinal Microbiome, Mice, Obesity, Phenotype, Pregnancy
Added March 3, 2020
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10 MeSH Terms
Predictive Accuracy of a Polygenic Risk Score Compared With a Clinical Risk Score for Incident Coronary Heart Disease.
Mosley JD, Gupta DK, Tan J, Yao J, Wells QS, Shaffer CM, Kundu S, Robinson-Cohen C, Psaty BM, Rich SS, Post WS, Guo X, Rotter JI, Roden DM, Gerszten RE, Wang TJ
(2020) JAMA 323: 627-635
MeSH Terms: Aged, Cohort Studies, Coronary Disease, Female, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genome-Wide Association Study, Genotype, Humans, Incidence, Male, Middle Aged, Multifactorial Inheritance, Myocardial Infarction, Odds Ratio, Phenotype, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Predictive Value of Tests, Proportional Hazards Models, Retrospective Studies, Risk, Risk Assessment
Show Abstract · Added March 24, 2020
Importance - Polygenic risk scores comprising millions of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) could be useful for population-wide coronary heart disease (CHD) screening.
Objective - To determine whether a polygenic risk score improves prediction of CHD compared with a guideline-recommended clinical risk equation.
Design, Setting, and Participants - A retrospective cohort study of the predictive accuracy of a previously validated polygenic risk score was assessed among 4847 adults of white European ancestry, aged 45 through 79 years, participating in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study and 2390 participating in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) from 1996 through December 31, 2015, the final day of follow-up. The performance of the polygenic risk score was compared with that of the 2013 American College of Cardiology and American Heart Association pooled cohort equations.
Exposures - Genetic risk was computed for each participant by summing the product of the weights and allele dosage across 6 630 149 SNPs. Weights were based on an international genome-wide association study.
Main Outcomes and Measures - Prediction of 10-year first CHD events (including myocardial infarctions, fatal coronary events, silent infarctions, revascularization procedures, or resuscitated cardiac arrest) assessed using measures of model discrimination, calibration, and net reclassification improvement (NRI).
Results - The study population included 4847 adults from the ARIC study (mean [SD] age, 62.9 [5.6] years; 56.4% women) and 2390 adults from the MESA cohort (mean [SD] age, 61.8 [9.6] years; 52.2% women). Incident CHD events occurred in 696 participants (14.4%) and 227 participants (9.5%), respectively, over median follow-up of 15.5 years (interquartile range [IQR], 6.3 years) and 14.2 (IQR, 2.5 years) years. The polygenic risk score was significantly associated with 10-year CHD incidence in ARIC with hazard ratios per SD increment of 1.24 (95% CI, 1.15 to 1.34) and in MESA, 1.38 (95% CI, 1.21 to 1.58). Addition of the polygenic risk score to the pooled cohort equations did not significantly increase the C statistic in either cohort (ARIC, change in C statistic, -0.001; 95% CI, -0.009 to 0.006; MESA, 0.021; 95% CI, -0.0004 to 0.043). At the 10-year risk threshold of 7.5%, the addition of the polygenic risk score to the pooled cohort equations did not provide significant improvement in reclassification in either ARIC (NRI, 0.018, 95% CI, -0.012 to 0.036) or MESA (NRI, 0.001, 95% CI, -0.038 to 0.076). The polygenic risk score did not significantly improve calibration in either cohort.
Conclusions and Relevance - In this analysis of 2 cohorts of US adults, the polygenic risk score was associated with incident coronary heart disease events but did not significantly improve discrimination, calibration, or risk reclassification compared with conventional predictors. These findings suggest that a polygenic risk score may not enhance risk prediction in a general, white middle-aged population.
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Analysis of a Therapeutic Antibody Cocktail Reveals Determinants for Cooperative and Broad Ebolavirus Neutralization.
Gilchuk P, Murin CD, Milligan JC, Cross RW, Mire CE, Ilinykh PA, Huang K, Kuzmina N, Altman PX, Hui S, Gunn BM, Bryan AL, Davidson E, Doranz BJ, Turner HL, Alkutkar T, Flinko R, Orlandi C, Carnahan R, Nargi R, Bombardi RG, Vodzak ME, Li S, Okoli A, Ibeawuchi M, Ohiaeri B, Lewis GK, Alter G, Bukreyev A, Saphire EO, Geisbert TW, Ward AB, Crowe JE
(2020) Immunity 52: 388-403.e12
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antibodies, Monoclonal, Antibodies, Neutralizing, Antibodies, Viral, Cell Line, Disease Models, Animal, Drug Therapy, Combination, Ebolavirus, Epitopes, Female, Glycoproteins, Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola, Humans, Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments, Macaca mulatta, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Molecular Mimicry, Protein Conformation
Show Abstract · Added March 31, 2020
Structural principles underlying the composition of protective antiviral monoclonal antibody (mAb) cocktails are poorly defined. Here, we exploited antibody cooperativity to develop a therapeutic mAb cocktail against Ebola virus. We systematically analyzed the antibody repertoire in human survivors and identified a pair of potently neutralizing mAbs that cooperatively bound to the ebolavirus glycoprotein (GP). High-resolution structures revealed that in a two-antibody cocktail, molecular mimicry was a major feature of mAb-GP interactions. Broadly neutralizing mAb rEBOV-520 targeted a conserved epitope on the GP base region. mAb rEBOV-548 bound to a glycan cap epitope, possessed neutralizing and Fc-mediated effector function activities, and potentiated neutralization by rEBOV-520. Remodeling of the glycan cap structures by the cocktail enabled enhanced GP binding and virus neutralization. The cocktail demonstrated resistance to virus escape and protected non-human primates (NHPs) against Ebola virus disease. These data illuminate structural principles of antibody cooperativity with implications for development of antiviral immunotherapeutics.
Copyright © 2020 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Cell-free hemoglobin increases inflammation, lung apoptosis, and microvascular permeability in murine polymicrobial sepsis.
Meegan JE, Shaver CM, Putz ND, Jesse JJ, Landstreet SR, Lee HNR, Sidorova TN, McNeil JB, Wynn JL, Cheung-Flynn J, Komalavilas P, Brophy CM, Ware LB, Bastarache JA
(2020) PLoS One 15: e0228727
MeSH Terms: Animals, Apoptosis, Capillary Permeability, Endothelial Cells, Female, Hemoglobins, Humans, Inflammation, Lung, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Oxidative Stress, Sepsis
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
Increased endothelial permeability is central to the pathogenesis of sepsis and leads to organ dysfunction and death but the endogenous mechanisms that drive increased endothelial permeability are not completely understood. We previously reported that cell-free hemoglobin (CFH), elevated in 80% of patients with sepsis, increases lung microvascular permeability in an ex vivo human lung model and cultured endothelial cells. In this study, we augmented a murine model of polymicrobial sepsis with elevated circulating CFH to test the hypothesis that CFH increases microvascular endothelial permeability by inducing endothelial apoptosis. Mice were treated with an intraperitoneal injection of cecal slurry with or without a single intravenous injection of CFH. Severity of illness, mortality, systemic and lung inflammation, endothelial injury and dysfunction and lung apoptosis were measured at selected time points. We found that CFH added to CS increased sepsis mortality, plasma inflammatory cytokines as well as lung apoptosis, edema and inflammation without affecting large vessel reactivity or vascular injury marker concentrations. These results suggest that CFH is an endogenous mediator of increased endothelial permeability and apoptosis in sepsis and may be a promising therapeutic target.
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Broad dengue neutralization in mosquitoes expressing an engineered antibody.
Buchman A, Gamez S, Li M, Antoshechkin I, Li HH, Wang HW, Chen CH, Klein MJ, Duchemin JB, Crowe JE, Paradkar PN, Akbari OS
(2020) PLoS Pathog 16: e1008103
MeSH Terms: Aedes, Animals, Antibodies, Viral, Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies, Dengue Virus, Female, Humans, Male, Protein Engineering, Single-Chain Antibodies
Show Abstract · Added March 31, 2020
With dengue virus (DENV) becoming endemic in tropical and subtropical regions worldwide, there is a pressing global demand for effective strategies to control the mosquitoes that spread this disease. Recent advances in genetic engineering technologies have made it possible to create mosquitoes with reduced vector competence, limiting their ability to acquire and transmit pathogens. Here we describe the development of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes synthetically engineered to impede vector competence to DENV. These mosquitoes express a gene encoding an engineered single-chain variable fragment derived from a broadly neutralizing DENV human monoclonal antibody and have significantly reduced viral infection, dissemination, and transmission rates for all four major antigenically distinct DENV serotypes. Importantly, this is the first engineered approach that targets all DENV serotypes, which is crucial for effective disease suppression. These results provide a compelling route for developing effective genetic-based DENV control strategies, which could be extended to curtail other arboviruses.
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Mass cytometry defines distinct immune profile in germinal center B-cell lymphomas.
Roussel M, Lhomme F, Roe CE, Bartkowiak T, Gravelle P, Laurent C, Fest T, Irish JM
(2020) Cancer Immunol Immunother 69: 407-420
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Female, Flow Cytometry, Germinal Center, Humans, Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse, Macrophages, Male, Middle Aged, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added January 14, 2020
Tumor-associated macrophage and T-cell subsets are implicated in the pathogenesis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, follicular lymphoma, and classical Hodgkin lymphoma. Macrophages provide essential mechanisms of tumor immune evasion through checkpoint ligand expression and secretion of suppressive cytokines. However, normal and tumor-associated macrophage phenotypes are less well characterized than those of tumor-infiltrating T-cell subsets, and it would be especially valuable to know whether the polarization state of macrophages differs across lymphoma tumor microenvironments. Here, an established mass cytometry panel designed to characterize myeloid-derived suppressor cells and known macrophage maturation and polarization states was applied to characterize B-lymphoma tumors and non-malignant human tissue. High-dimensional single-cell analyses were performed using dimensionality reduction and clustering tools. Phenotypically distinct intra-tumor macrophage subsets were identified based on abnormal marker expression profiles that were associated with lymphoma tumor types. While it had been proposed that measurement of CD163 and CD68 might be sufficient to reveal macrophage subsets in tumors, results here indicated that S100A9, CCR2, CD36, Slan, and CD32 should also be measured to effectively characterize lymphoma-specific tumor macrophages. Additionally, the presence of phenotypically distinct, abnormal macrophage populations was closely linked to the phenotype of intra-tumor T-cell populations, including PD-1 expressing T cells. These results further support the close links between macrophage polarization and T-cell functional state, as well as the rationale for targeting tumor-associated macrophages in cancer immunotherapies.
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Fine-mapping of 150 breast cancer risk regions identifies 191 likely target genes.
Fachal L, Aschard H, Beesley J, Barnes DR, Allen J, Kar S, Pooley KA, Dennis J, Michailidou K, Turman C, Soucy P, Lemaçon A, Lush M, Tyrer JP, Ghoussaini M, Moradi Marjaneh M, Jiang X, Agata S, Aittomäki K, Alonso MR, Andrulis IL, Anton-Culver H, Antonenkova NN, Arason A, Arndt V, Aronson KJ, Arun BK, Auber B, Auer PL, Azzollini J, Balmaña J, Barkardottir RB, Barrowdale D, Beeghly-Fadiel A, Benitez J, Bermisheva M, Białkowska K, Blanco AM, Blomqvist C, Blot W, Bogdanova NV, Bojesen SE, Bolla MK, Bonanni B, Borg A, Bosse K, Brauch H, Brenner H, Briceno I, Brock IW, Brooks-Wilson A, Brüning T, Burwinkel B, Buys SS, Cai Q, Caldés T, Caligo MA, Camp NJ, Campbell I, Canzian F, Carroll JS, Carter BD, Castelao JE, Chiquette J, Christiansen H, Chung WK, Claes KBM, Clarke CL, GEMO Study Collaborators, EMBRACE Collaborators, Collée JM, Cornelissen S, Couch FJ, Cox A, Cross SS, Cybulski C, Czene K, Daly MB, de la Hoya M, Devilee P, Diez O, Ding YC, Dite GS, Domchek SM, Dörk T, Dos-Santos-Silva I, Droit A, Dubois S, Dumont M, Duran M, Durcan L, Dwek M, Eccles DM, Engel C, Eriksson M, Evans DG, Fasching PA, Fletcher O, Floris G, Flyger H, Foretova L, Foulkes WD, Friedman E, Fritschi L, Frost D, Gabrielson M, Gago-Dominguez M, Gambino G, Ganz PA, Gapstur SM, Garber J, García-Sáenz JA, Gaudet MM, Georgoulias V, Giles GG, Glendon G, Godwin AK, Goldberg MS, Goldgar DE, González-Neira A, Tibiletti MG, Greene MH, Grip M, Gronwald J, Grundy A, Guénel P, Hahnen E, Haiman CA, Håkansson N, Hall P, Hamann U, Harrington PA, Hartikainen JM, Hartman M, He W, Healey CS, Heemskerk-Gerritsen BAM, Heyworth J, Hillemanns P, Hogervorst FBL, Hollestelle A, Hooning MJ, Hopper JL, Howell A, Huang G, Hulick PJ, Imyanitov EN, KConFab Investigators, HEBON Investigators, ABCTB Investigators, Isaacs C, Iwasaki M, Jager A, Jakimovska M, Jakubowska A, James PA, Janavicius R, Jankowitz RC, John EM, Johnson N, Jones ME, Jukkola-Vuorinen A, Jung A, Kaaks R, Kang D, Kapoor PM, Karlan BY, Keeman R, Kerin MJ, Khusnutdinova E, Kiiski JI, Kirk J, Kitahara CM, Ko YD, Konstantopoulou I, Kosma VM, Koutros S, Kubelka-Sabit K, Kwong A, Kyriacou K, Laitman Y, Lambrechts D, Lee E, Leslie G, Lester J, Lesueur F, Lindblom A, Lo WY, Long J, Lophatananon A, Loud JT, Lubiński J, MacInnis RJ, Maishman T, Makalic E, Mannermaa A, Manoochehri M, Manoukian S, Margolin S, Martinez ME, Matsuo K, Maurer T, Mavroudis D, Mayes R, McGuffog L, McLean C, Mebirouk N, Meindl A, Miller A, Miller N, Montagna M, Moreno F, Muir K, Mulligan AM, Muñoz-Garzon VM, Muranen TA, Narod SA, Nassir R, Nathanson KL, Neuhausen SL, Nevanlinna H, Neven P, Nielsen FC, Nikitina-Zake L, Norman A, Offit K, Olah E, Olopade OI, Olsson H, Orr N, Osorio A, Pankratz VS, Papp J, Park SK, Park-Simon TW, Parsons MT, Paul J, Pedersen IS, Peissel B, Peshkin B, Peterlongo P, Peto J, Plaseska-Karanfilska D, Prajzendanc K, Prentice R, Presneau N, Prokofyeva D, Pujana MA, Pylkäs K, Radice P, Ramus SJ, Rantala J, Rau-Murthy R, Rennert G, Risch HA, Robson M, Romero A, Rossing M, Saloustros E, Sánchez-Herrero E, Sandler DP, Santamariña M, Saunders C, Sawyer EJ, Scheuner MT, Schmidt DF, Schmutzler RK, Schneeweiss A, Schoemaker MJ, Schöttker B, Schürmann P, Scott C, Scott RJ, Senter L, Seynaeve CM, Shah M, Sharma P, Shen CY, Shu XO, Singer CF, Slavin TP, Smichkoska S, Southey MC, Spinelli JJ, Spurdle AB, Stone J, Stoppa-Lyonnet D, Sutter C, Swerdlow AJ, Tamimi RM, Tan YY, Tapper WJ, Taylor JA, Teixeira MR, Tengström M, Teo SH, Terry MB, Teulé A, Thomassen M, Thull DL, Tischkowitz M, Toland AE, Tollenaar RAEM, Tomlinson I, Torres D, Torres-Mejía G, Troester MA, Truong T, Tung N, Tzardi M, Ulmer HU, Vachon CM, van Asperen CJ, van der Kolk LE, van Rensburg EJ, Vega A, Viel A, Vijai J, Vogel MJ, Wang Q, Wappenschmidt B, Weinberg CR, Weitzel JN, Wendt C, Wildiers H, Winqvist R, Wolk A, Wu AH, Yannoukakos D, Zhang Y, Zheng W, Hunter D, Pharoah PDP, Chang-Claude J, García-Closas M, Schmidt MK, Milne RL, Kristensen VN, French JD, Edwards SL, Antoniou AC, Chenevix-Trench G, Simard J, Easton DF, Kraft P, Dunning AM
(2020) Nat Genet 52: 56-73
MeSH Terms: Bayes Theorem, Biomarkers, Tumor, Breast Neoplasms, Chromosome Mapping, Female, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genome-Wide Association Study, Humans, Linkage Disequilibrium, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Quantitative Trait Loci, Regulatory Sequences, Nucleic Acid, Risk Factors
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
Genome-wide association studies have identified breast cancer risk variants in over 150 genomic regions, but the mechanisms underlying risk remain largely unknown. These regions were explored by combining association analysis with in silico genomic feature annotations. We defined 205 independent risk-associated signals with the set of credible causal variants in each one. In parallel, we used a Bayesian approach (PAINTOR) that combines genetic association, linkage disequilibrium and enriched genomic features to determine variants with high posterior probabilities of being causal. Potentially causal variants were significantly over-represented in active gene regulatory regions and transcription factor binding sites. We applied our INQUSIT pipeline for prioritizing genes as targets of those potentially causal variants, using gene expression (expression quantitative trait loci), chromatin interaction and functional annotations. Known cancer drivers, transcription factors and genes in the developmental, apoptosis, immune system and DNA integrity checkpoint gene ontology pathways were over-represented among the highest-confidence target genes.
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13 MeSH Terms
Discovery of rare coding variants in OGDHL and BRCA2 in relation to breast cancer risk in Chinese women.
Guo X, Long J, Chen Z, Shu XO, Xiang YB, Wen W, Zeng C, Gao YT, Cai Q, Zheng W
(2020) Int J Cancer 146: 2175-2181
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, BRCA2 Protein, Breast Neoplasms, Case-Control Studies, China, Databases, Genetic, Female, Gene Frequency, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Humans, Ketoglutarate Dehydrogenase Complex, Middle Aged, Mutation, Missense, Whole Exome Sequencing
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
The missing heritability of breast cancer could be partially attributed to rare variants (MAF < 0.5%). To identify breast cancer-associated rare coding variants, we conducted whole-exome sequencing (~50×) in genomic DNA samples obtained from 831 breast cancer cases and 839 controls of Chinese females. Using burden tests for each gene that included rare missense or predicted deleterious variants, we identified 29 genes showing promising associations with breast cancer risk. We replicated the association for two genes, OGDHL and BRCA2, at a Bonferroni-corrected p < 0.05, by genotyping an independent set of samples from 1,628 breast cancer cases and 1,943 controls. The association for OGDHL was primarily driven by three predicted deleterious variants (p.Val827Met, p.Pro839Leu, p.Phe836Ser; p < 0.01 for all). For BRCA2, we characterized a total of 27 disruptive variants, including 18 nonsense, six frameshift and three splicing variants, whereas they were only detected in cases, but none of the controls. All of these variants were either very rare (AF < 0.1%) or not detected in >4,500 East Asian women from the genome Aggregation database (gnomAD), providing additional support to our findings. Our study revealed a potential novel gene and multiple disruptive variants of BRCA2 for breast cancer risk, which may identify high-risk women in Chinese populations.
© 2019 UICC.
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15 MeSH Terms
Cerebral hemodynamics and metabolism are similar in sickle cell disease patients with hemoglobin SS and Sβ thalassemia phenotypes.
Ikwuanusi I, Jordan LC, Lee CA, Patel NJ, Waddle S, Pruthi S, Davis LT, Griffin A, DeBaun MR, Kassim AA, Donahue MJ
(2020) Am J Hematol 95: E66-E68
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Anemia, Sickle Cell, Cerebrovascular Circulation, Child, Female, Hemodynamics, Hemoglobin, Sickle, Humans, Male, Thalassemia
Added March 24, 2020
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Temporo-frontal activation during phonological processing predicts gains in arithmetic facts in young children.
Suárez-Pellicioni M, Fuchs L, Booth JR
(2019) Dev Cogn Neurosci 40: 100735
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Brain, Brain Mapping, Child, Female, Frontal Lobe, Humans, Male, Mathematics, Phonetics, Temporal Lobe
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
Behavioral studies have shown discrepant results regarding the role of phonology in predicting math gains. The objective of this study was to use fMRI to study the role of activation during a rhyming judgment task in predicting behavioral gains on math fluency, multiplication, and subtraction skill. We focused within the left middle/superior temporal gyrus and left inferior frontal gyrus, brain areas associated with the storage of phonological representations and with their access, respectively. We ran multiple regression analyses to determine whether activation predicted gains in the three math measures, separately for younger (i.e. 10 years old) and older (i.e 12 years old) children. Results showed that activation in both temporal and frontal cortex only predicted gains in fluency and multiplication skill, and only for younger children. This study suggests that both temporal and frontal cortex activation during phonological processing are important in predicting gains in math tasks that involve the retrieval of facts that are stored as phonological codes in memory. Moreover, these results were specific to younger children, suggesting that phonology is most important in the early stages of math development. When the math task involved subtractions, which relies on quantity representations, phonological processes were not important in driving gains.
Copyright © 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.
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11 MeSH Terms