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Self-management as a mediator of family functioning and depressive symptoms with health outcomes in youth with type 1 diabetes.
Whittemore R, Liberti L, Jeon S, Chao A, Jaser SS, Grey M
(2014) West J Nurs Res 36: 1254-71
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Child, Depression, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1, Family Relations, Female, Humans, Male, Outcome Assessment (Health Care), Quality of Life, Self Care
Show Abstract · Added March 11, 2015
This study examined the relationship of family functioning and depressive symptoms with self-management, glycemic control, and quality of life in a sample of adolescents with type 1 diabetes. It also explored whether self-management mediates family functioning, depressive symptoms, and diabetes-related outcomes. Structural equation modeling was used to estimate parameters in the conceptual causal pathway and test mediation effects. Adolescents (n = 320) were primarily female (55%), younger adolescents (58%), and self-identified as White (63%). Self-management mediated the relationship between family conflict, family warmth-caring, parent guidance-control, and youth depressive symptoms with glycosylated hemoglobin (A1C). In addition, self-management mediated the relationship between family conflict and youth depressive symptoms with quality of life. Supporting optimal family functioning and treating elevated depressive symptoms in adolescents with type 1 diabetes has the potential to improve self-management, glycemic control, and quality of life.
© The Author(s) 2013.
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11 MeSH Terms
Coping and psychological distress in mothers of adolescents with type 1 diabetes.
Jaser SS, Linsky R, Grey M
(2014) Matern Child Health J 18: 101-108
MeSH Terms: Adaptation, Psychological, Adolescent, Adult, Analysis of Variance, Anxiety, Child, Depression, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1, Family Relations, Female, Glycated Hemoglobin A, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Mothers, Psychology, Adolescent, Quality of Life, Sickness Impact Profile, Stress, Psychological
Show Abstract · Added March 11, 2015
The purpose of this study was to describe coping in mothers of adolescents with type 1 diabetes and to examine the association among mothers' diabetes-related stress and coping strategies and maternal psychological distress (e.g., symptoms of anxiety and depression), adolescent adjustment (e.g., symptoms of depression, quality of life), diabetes-related family conflict, and glycemic control. One hundred and eighteen mother-adolescent dyads completed measures of diabetes-related stress, coping, symptoms of anxiety and depression, quality of life, and family conflict. Data on glycemic control were collected from adolescents' medical charts. Single/divorced mothers and mothers of color were significantly more likely to use disengagement coping strategies (e.g., avoidance) than White and married/partnered mothers. Mothers' use of primary control coping (e.g., problem solving) and secondary control coping (e.g., acceptance) strategies was related to fewer symptoms of anxiety (r = - .51, -.39) and depression (r = - .32, -.37) and less family conflict (r = - .22, -.30, all p < .05). Mothers' use of disengagement coping strategies was related to greater symptoms of anxiety (r = .30) and depression (r = .27, both p < .01). Further, secondary control coping was found to mediate the relationship between diabetes-related stress and maternal symptoms of anxiety and depression. Maternal coping was not significantly associated with adolescent outcomes. The ways in which mothers of adolescents with type 1 diabetes cope with diabetes-related stress are associated with psychological distress and family conflict. By identifying and improving mothers' coping through screening and targeted interventions, we may have the potential to improve both maternal and adolescent outcomes.
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19 MeSH Terms
Critical and honest conversations: the evidence behind the "Choosing Wisely" campaign recommendations by the American Society of Nephrology.
Williams AW, Dwyer AC, Eddy AA, Fink JC, Jaber BL, Linas SL, Michael B, O'Hare AM, Schaefer HM, Shaffer RN, Trachtman H, Weiner DE, Falk AR, American Society of Nephrology Quality, and Patient Safety Task Force
(2012) Clin J Am Soc Nephrol 7: 1664-72
MeSH Terms: Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal, Catheterization, Central Venous, Cost Savings, Cost-Benefit Analysis, Evidence-Based Medicine, Guideline Adherence, Health Care Costs, Health Promotion, Health Services Misuse, Hematinics, Humans, Mass Screening, Nephrology, Patient Safety, Physician-Patient Relations, Practice Guidelines as Topic, Professional-Family Relations, Program Development, Quality Indicators, Health Care, Renal Dialysis, Renal Insufficiency, Chronic, Societies, Medical, United States
Show Abstract · Added February 25, 2014
Estimates suggest that one third of United States health care spending results from overuse or misuse of tests, procedures, and therapies. The American Board of Internal Medicine Foundation, in partnership with Consumer Reports, initiated the "Choosing Wisely" campaign to identify areas in patient care and resource use most open to improvement. Nine subspecialty organizations joined the campaign; each organization identified five tests, procedures, or therapies that are overused, are misused, or could potentially lead to harm or unnecessary health care spending. Each of the American Society of Nephrology's (ASN's) 10 advisory groups submitted recommendations for inclusion. The ASN Quality and Patient Safety Task Force selected five recommendations based on relevance and importance to individuals with kidney disease.Recommendations selected were: (1) Do not perform routine cancer screening for dialysis patients with limited life expectancies without signs or symptoms; (2) do not administer erythropoiesis-stimulating agents to CKD patients with hemoglobin levels ≥10 g/dl without symptoms of anemia; (3) avoid nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in individuals with hypertension, heart failure, or CKD of all causes, including diabetes; (4) do not place peripherally inserted central catheters in stage 3-5 CKD patients without consulting nephrology; (5) do not initiate chronic dialysis without ensuring a shared decision-making process between patients, their families, and their physicians.These five recommendations and supporting evidence give providers information to facilitate prudent care decisions and empower patients to actively participate in critical, honest conversations about their care, potentially reducing unnecessary health care spending and preventing harm.
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23 MeSH Terms
Medical student education program in Alzheimer's disease: the PAIRS Program.
Jefferson AL, Cantwell NG, Byerly LK, Morhardt D
(2012) BMC Med Educ 12: 80
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Alzheimer Disease, Attitude of Health Personnel, Boston, Career Choice, Caregivers, Clinical Competence, Communication, Cooperative Behavior, Cost of Illness, Curriculum, Education, Medical, Undergraduate, Educational Measurement, Female, Geriatrics, Humans, Male, Peer Group, Physician-Patient Relations, Professional-Family Relations, School Admission Criteria, Schools, Medical, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
BACKGROUND - As life expectancy increases, dementia incidence will also increase, creating a greater need for physicians well-trained to provide integrated geriatric care. However, research suggests medical students have limited knowledge or interest in pursuing geriatric or dementia care. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the PAIRS Program and its effectiveness in enhancing medical education as a service-learning activity and replication model for the Buddy ProgramTM.
METHODS - Between 2007 and 2011, four consecutive classes of first year Boston University School of Medicine students (n = 45; 24 ± 3 years, 58% female, 53% White) participated in a year-long program in which they were paired with a patient with early-stage Alzheimer's disease (AD). Assessments included pre- and post-program dementia knowledge tests and a post-program reflective essay.
RESULTS - Program completion was 100% (n = 45). A paired-sample t-test revealed a modest improvement in dementia knowledge post-program (p < 0.001). Using qualitative coding methods, 12 overarching themes emerged from the students' reflective essays, such as observing care partner burden, reporting a human side to AD, reporting experiences from the program that will impact future clinical practice, and obtaining a greater understanding of AD.
CONCLUSIONS - Quantitative and qualitative findings suggest that the PAIRS Program can enhance the acquisition of knowledge, skills, and positive attitudes regarding geriatric healthcare in future generations of physicians, a skill set that is becoming increasingly relevant in light of the rapidly aging population. Furthermore, results suggest that The Buddy ProgramTM model can be successfully replicated.
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MeSH Terms
Parental perceptions of care of children at end of life.
Gilmer MJ, Foster TL, Bell CJ, Mulder J, Carter BS
(2013) Am J Hosp Palliat Care 30: 53-8
MeSH Terms: Attitude of Health Personnel, Child, Hospitalized, Child, Preschool, Communication, Consumer Behavior, Decision Making, Female, Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice, Humans, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Intensive Care Units, Neonatal, Intensive Care Units, Pediatric, Male, Pain Management, Parents, Patient Care Team, Professional-Family Relations, Terminal Care
Show Abstract · Added March 11, 2014
OBJECTIVE - Little is known regarding the perceptions of parents about end-of-life care for their children. This study describes parental perceptions of the care of hospitalized, terminally ill children in the areas of (1) clinical management, (2) interdisciplinary support, and (3) pain and symptom management.
METHODS - Through a mixed methods design, researchers interviewed a representative sampling of bereaved parents via telephone.
RESULTS - Data provided evidence of areas which lack satisfaction with elements of end-of-life care of hospitalized children.
CONCLUSION - Parental satisfaction with their child's care during end of life indicates need for improvement in pain management, communication, and parental involvement in decision making. While education cannot guarantee desired changes in attitudes or behaviors, it may provide the essential foundation of knowledge, skills, and ethical understanding needed by professional providers.
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19 MeSH Terms
Male gender role strain as a barrier to African American men's physical activity.
Griffith DM, Gunter K, Allen JO
(2011) Health Educ Behav 38: 482-91
MeSH Terms: Adult, African Americans, Aged, Employment, Family Relations, Focus Groups, Gender Identity, Health Behavior, Humans, Male, Michigan, Middle Aged, Motor Activity, Qualitative Research, Socioeconomic Factors, Time Factors, Urban Population
Show Abstract · Added March 27, 2014
Despite the potential health consequences, African American men tend to treat their roles as providers, fathers, spouses, and community members as more important than engaging in health behaviors such as physical activity. We conducted 14 exploratory focus groups with 105 urban, middle-aged African American men from the Midwest to examine factors that influence their health behaviors. Thematic content analysis revealed three interrelated barriers to physical activity: (a) work, family, and community commitments and priorities limited time and motivation for engaging in physical activity; (b) physical activity was not a normative individual or social activity and contributed to men prioritizing work and family responsibilities over physical activity; and (c) the effort men exerted in seeking to fulfill the provider role limited their motivation and energy to engage in physical activity. These findings highlight the need for physical activity interventions that consider how health fits in the overall context of men's lives.
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17 MeSH Terms
Provider and partner interactions in the treatment decision-making process for newly diagnosed localized prostate cancer.
Zeliadt SB, Penson DF, Moinpour CM, Blough DK, Fedorenko CR, Hall IJ, Smith JL, Ekwueme DU, Thompson IM, Keane TE, Ramsey SD
(2011) BJU Int 108: 851-6; discussion 856-7
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Decision Making, Family Relations, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Patient Participation, Professional-Family Relations, Prostatic Neoplasms, Social Support, Spouses
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
OBJECTIVE - • To evaluate the degree to which the partners of prostate cancer patients participate in the shared decision-making process with the patients' providers during the time between diagnosis and initiating treatment.
PATIENTS AND METHODS - • We recruited patients with newly diagnosed local-stage prostate cancer and their partners to complete take-home surveys after biopsy but before initiating treatment at urology practices in three states. • We asked partners to describe their roles in the decision-making process, including participation in clinic visits, and perceptions of encouragement from providers to participate in the treatment decision-making process. We also asked partners to rate their satisfaction with the patients' providers.
RESULTS - • Family members of 80% of newly diagnosed patients agreed to participate; most (93%) were partners (i.e. spouses or significant others). Most partners (93%) had direct contact with the patients' physicians. • Among the partners who had contact with providers, most (67%) were very satisfied with the patients' providers and 80% indicated that the doctor encouraged them to participate in the treatment decision. Overall, 91% of partners reported very frequent discussions with their loved one about the pending treatment decision, and 69% reported that their role was to help the patient make a decision. • In multivariate models, provider encouragement of partner participation was associated with higher partner satisfaction (odds ratio 3.4, 95% CI 1.4-8.4) and an increased likelihood of partners reporting very frequent discussions with their loved one (odds ratio 6.1, 95% CI 1.3-27.7).
CONCLUSIONS - • Partners often attended clinic visits and were very involved in discussions about treatment options with both loved ones and providers. • Provider encouragement of participation by partners greatly facilitates shared decision-making between patients and partners.
© 2011 THE AUTHORS. BJU INTERNATIONAL © 2011 BJU INTERNATIONAL.
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14 MeSH Terms
Pediatric palliative care in childhood cancer nursing: from diagnosis to cure or end of life.
Foster TL, Lafond DA, Reggio C, Hinds PS
(2010) Semin Oncol Nurs 26: 205-21
MeSH Terms: Bereavement, Child, Communication, Culture, Ethics, Nursing, Humans, Neoplasms, Oncology Nursing, Palliative Care, Pediatric Nursing, Professional-Family Relations, Spirituality
Show Abstract · Added March 11, 2014
OBJECTIVES - To describe selected components of pediatric palliative care from diagnosis to cure or end of life that combine to help nurses and other clinicians achieve goals of care for children with cancer and their families.
DATA SOURCES - Published articles.
CONCLUSION - Pediatric palliative care is characterized by diversity of care delivery models; effect of cancer on the family as the central focus of care; and consideration of culture, spirituality, communication, and ethical standards. End-of-life issues that can be anticipated by nurses and other clinicians include symptoms of cancer or its treatment, the importance of hopefulness, the relevance of trying to be a good parent in decision making, the meaning of legacy making of ill children, and family bereavement.
IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING PRACTICE - Direct nursing care strategies to achieve pediatric palliative care goals are vital to reduce child and family suffering from cancer.
Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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12 MeSH Terms
Psychological problems in adolescents with diabetes.
Jaser SS
(2010) Adolesc Med State Art Rev 21: 138-51, x-xi
MeSH Terms: Adaptation, Psychological, Adolescent, Depression, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1, Family Relations, Feeding and Eating Disorders, Humans, Hypoglycemia, Mass Screening, Personal Autonomy
Show Abstract · Added March 11, 2015
For youth with type 1 diabetes (T1DM), the transition into adolescence is often associated with poorer adherence to treatment, deteriorating metabolic control, and increased risk for psychological disorders. The current article summarizes recent findings on psychological problems for adolescents with diabetes, including depression, eating disorders, fear of hypoglycemia, and problems specific to adolescents with T2DM. The impact of family functioning on adolescent adjustment and the importance of parent-child collaboration on treatment management is emphasized. By using the strategies described in this article, primary care providers have the potential to support adolescents with diabetes, while screening for problems that may be better treated by other professionals.
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10 MeSH Terms
Bereaved parents' and siblings' reports of legacies created by children with cancer.
Foster TL, Gilmer MJ, Davies B, Barrera M, Fairclough D, Vannatta K, Gerhardt CA
(2009) J Pediatr Oncol Nurs 26: 369-76
MeSH Terms: Adaptation, Psychological, Adolescent, Adult, Bereavement, Child, Family Relations, Female, Humans, Male, Neoplasms, Parents, Qualitative Research, Siblings, Stress, Psychological, Time Factors
Show Abstract · Added March 11, 2014
This qualitative study explored bereaved parents' and siblings' reports of legacies created by children with advanced cancer. Participants included 40 families of children who died from cancer, with 36 mothers, 27 fathers, and 40 siblings (ages 8-18 years). Individual interviews were completed at home approximately 10.68 months (SD = 3.48) after the child's death. Content analysis of interviews indicated that many children living with cancer did specific things to be remembered, such as making crafts for others, willing away belongings, writing letters to loved ones, and giving special gifts. Some children, particularly those who were very ill or died unexpectedly, did not intentionally do or say anything to be remembered. Legacies included bereaved individuals remembering children's qualities, concern for family, and beliefs about afterlife. Having advanced cancer appeared to motivate children to influence others' lives and prepare for their own deaths. Children's advice about how to live life inspired bereaved family members. Findings contribute to the current knowledge of legacy-making in children and offer implications for practice and future research.
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15 MeSH Terms