Other search tools

About this data

The publication data currently available has been vetted by Vanderbilt faculty, staff, administrators and trainees. The data itself is retrieved directly from NCBI's PubMed and is automatically updated on a weekly basis to ensure accuracy and completeness.

If you have any questions or comments, please contact us.

Results: 1 to 10 of 518

Publication Record

Connections

Functionally oriented analysis of cardiometabolic traits in a trans-ethnic sample.
Petty LE, Highland HM, Gamazon ER, Hu H, Karhade M, Chen HH, de Vries PS, Grove ML, Aguilar D, Bell GI, Huff CD, Hanis CL, Doddapaneni H, Munzy DM, Gibbs RA, Ma J, Parra EJ, Cruz M, Valladares-Salgado A, Arking DE, Barbeira A, Im HK, Morrison AC, Boerwinkle E, Below JE
(2019) Hum Mol Genet 28: 1212-1224
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Blood Pressure, Body Mass Index, Chromosome Mapping, Ethnic Groups, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Forecasting, Genetic Association Studies, Genome-Wide Association Study, Humans, Male, Metabolome, Middle Aged, Multifactorial Inheritance, Phenotype, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Transcriptome
Show Abstract · Added February 15, 2019
Interpretation of genetic association results is difficult because signals often lack biological context. To generate hypotheses of the functional genetic etiology of complex cardiometabolic traits, we estimated the genetically determined component of gene expression from common variants using PrediXcan (1) and determined genes with differential predicted expression by trait. PrediXcan imputes tissue-specific expression levels from genetic variation using variant-level effect on gene expression in transcriptome data. To explore the value of imputed genetically regulated gene expression (GReX) models across different ancestral populations, we evaluated imputed expression levels for predictive accuracy genome-wide in RNA sequence data in samples drawn from European-ancestry and African-ancestry populations and identified substantial predictive power using European-derived models in a non-European target population. We then tested the association of GReX on 15 cardiometabolic traits including blood lipid levels, body mass index, height, blood pressure, fasting glucose and insulin, RR interval, fibrinogen level, factor VII level and white blood cell and platelet counts in 15 755 individuals across three ancestry groups, resulting in 20 novel gene-phenotype associations reaching experiment-wide significance across ancestries. In addition, we identified 18 significant novel gene-phenotype associations in our ancestry-specific analyses. Top associations were assessed for additional support via query of S-PrediXcan (2) results derived from publicly available genome-wide association studies summary data. Collectively, these findings illustrate the utility of transcriptome-based imputation models for discovery of cardiometabolic effect genes in a diverse dataset.
© The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
19 MeSH Terms
Race- and Sex-related Differences in Nephrolithiasis Risk Among Blacks and Whites in the Southern Community Cohort Study.
Hsi RS, Kabagambe EK, Shu X, Han X, Miller NL, Lipworth L
(2018) Urology 118: 36-42
MeSH Terms: Adult, African Americans, Aged, Cohort Studies, Continental Population Groups, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Humans, Incidence, Kidney Calculi, Male, Medicaid, Medicare, Middle Aged, Proportional Hazards Models, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, Sex Factors, Socioeconomic Factors, United States
Show Abstract · Added July 18, 2018
OBJECTIVE - To investigate race-sex associations with risk among whites and blacks in the southeastern United States. The relationship between race, sex, and kidney stone risk is poorly understood.
METHODS - Participants were 42,136 black and white adults enrolled in the Southern Community Cohort Study between 2002 and 2009, with no history of kidney stones and receiving Medicare or Medicaid services. Incident kidney stone diagnoses through December 2014 were determined via linkage with Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services research files. Hazard ratios (HRs) for associations with race and sex were computed from multivariable Cox proportional hazards models adjusting for baseline characteristics, comorbid diseases, and dietary intakes.
RESULTS - During 116,931 and 270,917 person-years of follow-up for whites and blacks, respectively, age-adjusted incidence rates (95% confidence interval [CI]) were 5.98 (4.73-7.23) and 4.50 (3.86-5.14) per 1000 person-years for white men and women, respectively, while corresponding rates among blacks were 2.19 (1.71-2.67) and 2.47 (2.19-2.75) per 1000 person-years. Risk was higher among whites compared to blacks (HR = 2.23, 95% CI 1.97-2.53). Male sex was significantly associated with risk among whites (HR = 1.45, 95% CI 1.20-1.75), but not among blacks (HR = 0.90, 95% CI 0.75-1.07). Formal tests of interaction by race and sex were statistically significant for all models (P = .01 for fully adjusted model).
CONCLUSION - The association of incident kidney stones with sex differs between whites and blacks. White men have the highest risk, while no difference in risk is observed between black men and women.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
20 MeSH Terms
Associations of coronary artery calcified plaque density with mortality in type 2 diabetes: the Diabetes Heart Study.
Raffield LM, Cox AJ, Criqui MH, Hsu FC, Terry JG, Xu J, Freedman BI, Carr JJ, Bowden DW
(2018) Cardiovasc Diabetol 17: 67
MeSH Terms: Adult, African Continental Ancestry Group, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Coronary Angiography, Coronary Artery Disease, Coronary Vessels, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Plaque, Atherosclerotic, Prognosis, Risk Factors, United States, Vascular Calcification
Show Abstract · Added September 11, 2018
BACKGROUND - Coronary artery calcified plaque (CAC) is strongly predictive of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events and mortality, both in general populations and individuals with type 2 diabetes at high risk for CVD. CAC is typically reported as an Agatston score, which is weighted for increased plaque density. However, the role of CAC density in CVD risk prediction, independently and with CAC volume, remains unclear.
METHODS - We examined the role of CAC density in individuals with type 2 diabetes from the family-based Diabetes Heart Study and the African American-Diabetes Heart Study. CAC density was calculated as mass divided by volume, and associations with incident all-cause and CVD mortality [median follow-up 10.2 years European Americans (n = 902, n = 286 deceased), 5.2 years African Americans (n = 552, n = 93 deceased)] were examined using Cox proportional hazards models, independently and in models adjusted for CAC volume.
RESULTS - In European Americans, CAC density, like Agatston score and volume, was consistently associated with increased risk of all-cause and CVD mortality (p ≤ 0.002) in models adjusted for age, sex, statin use, total cholesterol, HDL, systolic blood pressure, high blood pressure medication use, and current smoking. However, these associations were no longer significant when models were additionally adjusted for CAC volume. CAC density was not significantly associated with mortality, either alone or adjusted for CAC volume, in African Americans.
CONCLUSIONS - CAC density is not associated with mortality independent from CAC volume in European Americans and African Americans with type 2 diabetes.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
18 MeSH Terms
Balanced high fat diet reduces cardiovascular risk in obese women although changes in adipose tissue, lipoproteins, and insulin resistance differ by race.
Niswender KD, Fazio S, Gower BA, Silver HJ
(2018) Metabolism 82: 125-134
MeSH Terms: Adipose Tissue, Adult, African Continental Ancestry Group, Cardiovascular Diseases, Diet, High-Fat, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Humans, Insulin Resistance, Lipoproteins, Middle Aged, Obesity, Risk Factors, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2018
BACKGROUND - We previously reported that consuming a balanced high fat diet (BHFD) wherein total saturated fat was reduced and total unsaturated fat increased by proportionately balancing the type of fat (1/3 saturated, 1/3 monounsaturated, 1/3 polyunsaturated) led to significant improvements in inflammatory burden, blood pressure, and vascular function in obese premenopausal European American (EA) and African American (AA) women.
OBJECTIVE - Here we compared changes in adipose tissue, lipoproteins, insulin resistance, and cardiovascular risk between EA and AA women.
METHODS - Dietary intakes, plasma fatty acids, lipids, apolipoproteins, lipoproteins, HOMA-IR and ASCVD risk was measured in 144 women who consumed BHFD for 16 weeks. Generalized linear modeling was performed while controlling for change in body weight.
RESULTS - EA women had greater reductions in visceral adipose tissue. Only EA women had significant reductions in fasting insulin levels (↓24.8%) and HOMA-IR (↓29%) scores. In EA women, the most significant improvements occurred in VLDL particle size (↑), apolipoprotein B levels (↑), serum TG (↓), number of plasma LDL particles (↓), and serum LDL-cholesterol (↓). In AA women, significant improvements occurred in HDL particle size (↑), number of large HDL particles (↑), and apolipoprotein AI levels (↑). Consequently, both groups had improved ASCVD risk scores (↓5.5%).
CONCLUSIONS - Consuming the balanced high fat diet led to significant reduction in cardiovascular risk factors in both groups. However, the pattern of response to BHFD differed with EA women responding more in components of the apolipoprotein B pathway versus AA women responding more in components of the apolipoprotein AI pathway.
Published by Elsevier Inc.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
14 MeSH Terms
Genome-wide association study in 79,366 European-ancestry individuals informs the genetic architecture of 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels.
Jiang X, O'Reilly PF, Aschard H, Hsu YH, Richards JB, Dupuis J, Ingelsson E, Karasik D, Pilz S, Berry D, Kestenbaum B, Zheng J, Luan J, Sofianopoulou E, Streeten EA, Albanes D, Lutsey PL, Yao L, Tang W, Econs MJ, Wallaschofski H, Völzke H, Zhou A, Power C, McCarthy MI, Michos ED, Boerwinkle E, Weinstein SJ, Freedman ND, Huang WY, Van Schoor NM, van der Velde N, Groot LCPGM, Enneman A, Cupples LA, Booth SL, Vasan RS, Liu CT, Zhou Y, Ripatti S, Ohlsson C, Vandenput L, Lorentzon M, Eriksson JG, Shea MK, Houston DK, Kritchevsky SB, Liu Y, Lohman KK, Ferrucci L, Peacock M, Gieger C, Beekman M, Slagboom E, Deelen J, Heemst DV, Kleber ME, März W, de Boer IH, Wood AC, Rotter JI, Rich SS, Robinson-Cohen C, den Heijer M, Jarvelin MR, Cavadino A, Joshi PK, Wilson JF, Hayward C, Lind L, Michaëlsson K, Trompet S, Zillikens MC, Uitterlinden AG, Rivadeneira F, Broer L, Zgaga L, Campbell H, Theodoratou E, Farrington SM, Timofeeva M, Dunlop MG, Valdes AM, Tikkanen E, Lehtimäki T, Lyytikäinen LP, Kähönen M, Raitakari OT, Mikkilä V, Ikram MA, Sattar N, Jukema JW, Wareham NJ, Langenberg C, Forouhi NG, Gundersen TE, Khaw KT, Butterworth AS, Danesh J, Spector T, Wang TJ, Hyppönen E, Kraft P, Kiel DP
(2018) Nat Commun 9: 260
MeSH Terms: Amidohydrolases, Autoimmune Diseases, Cohort Studies, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Genome-Wide Association Study, Humans, Male, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Vesicular Transport Proteins, Vitamin D
Show Abstract · Added January 3, 2019
Vitamin D is a steroid hormone precursor that is associated with a range of human traits and diseases. Previous GWAS of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations have identified four genome-wide significant loci (GC, NADSYN1/DHCR7, CYP2R1, CYP24A1). In this study, we expand the previous SUNLIGHT Consortium GWAS discovery sample size from 16,125 to 79,366 (all European descent). This larger GWAS yields two additional loci harboring genome-wide significant variants (P = 4.7×10 at rs8018720 in SEC23A, and P = 1.9×10 at rs10745742 in AMDHD1). The overall estimate of heritability of 25-hydroxyvitamin D serum concentrations attributable to GWAS common SNPs is 7.5%, with statistically significant loci explaining 38% of this total. Further investigation identifies signal enrichment in immune and hematopoietic tissues, and clustering with autoimmune diseases in cell-type-specific analysis. Larger studies are required to identify additional common SNPs, and to explore the role of rare or structural variants and gene-gene interactions in the heritability of circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
MeSH Terms
Transethnic Evaluation Identifies Low-Frequency Loci Associated With 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Concentrations.
Hong J, Hatchell KE, Bradfield JP, Bjonnes A, Chesi A, Lai CQ, Langefeld CD, Lu L, Lu Y, Lutsey PL, Musani SK, Nalls MA, Robinson-Cohen C, Roizen JD, Saxena R, Tucker KL, Ziegler JT, Arking DE, Bis JC, Boerwinkle E, Bottinger EP, Bowden DW, Gilsanz V, Houston DK, Kalkwarf HJ, Kelly A, Lappe JM, Liu Y, Michos ED, Oberfield SE, Palmer ND, Rotter JI, Sapkota B, Shepherd JA, Wilson JG, Basu S, de Boer IH, Divers J, Freedman BI, Grant SFA, Hakanarson H, Harris TB, Kestenbaum BR, Kritchevsky SB, Loos RJF, Norris JM, Norwood AF, Ordovas JM, Pankow JS, Psaty BM, Sanghera DK, Wagenknecht LE, Zemel BS, Meigs J, Dupuis J, Florez JC, Wang T, Liu CT, Engelman CD, Billings LK
(2018) J Clin Endocrinol Metab 103: 1380-1392
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, African Americans, Aged, Body Mass Index, Child, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Gene Frequency, Genetic Loci, Genome-Wide Association Study, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, United States, Vitamin D, Vitamin D Deficiency, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added January 3, 2019
Context - Vitamin D inadequacy is common in the adult population of the United States. Although the genetic determinants underlying vitamin D inadequacy have been studied in people of European ancestry, less is known about populations with Hispanic or African ancestry.
Objective - The Trans-Ethnic Evaluation of Vitamin D (TRANSCEN-D) genomewide association study (GWAS) consortium was assembled to replicate genetic associations with 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations from the Study of Underlying Genetic Determinants of Vitamin D and Highly Related Traits (SUNLIGHT) meta-analyses of European ancestry and to identify genetic variants related to vitamin D concentrations in African and Hispanic ancestries.
Design - Ancestry-specific (Hispanic and African) and transethnic (Hispanic, African, and European) meta-analyses were performed with Meta-Analysis Helper software (METAL).
Patients or Other Participants - In total, 8541 African American and 3485 Hispanic American (from North America) participants from 12 cohorts and 16,124 European participants from SUNLIGHT were included in the study.
Main Outcome Measures - Blood concentrations of 25(OH)D were measured for all participants.
Results - Ancestry-specific analyses in African and Hispanic Americans replicated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in GC (2 and 4 SNPs, respectively). An SNP (rs79666294) near the KIF4B gene was identified in the African American cohort. Transethnic evaluation replicated GC and DHCR7 region SNPs. Additionally, the transethnic analyses revealed SNPs rs719700 and rs1410656 near the ANO6/ARID2 and HTR2A genes, respectively.
Conclusions - Ancestry-specific and transethnic GWASs of 25(OH)D confirmed findings in GC and DHCR7 for African and Hispanic American samples and revealed findings near KIF4B, ANO6/ARID2, and HTR2A. The biological mechanisms that link these regions with 25(OH)D metabolism warrant further investigation.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
MeSH Terms
Mitochondrial Haplogroups Modify the Effect of Diabetes Duration and HbA1c on Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy Risk in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes.
Mitchell SL, Neininger AC, Bruce CN, Chocron IM, Bregman JA, Estopinal CB, Muhammad A, Umfress AC, Jarrell KL, Warden C, Harlow PA, Wellons M, Samuels DC, Brantley MA
(2017) Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 58: 6481-6488
MeSH Terms: Aged, Blood Glucose, Case-Control Studies, DNA, Mitochondrial, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Diabetic Retinopathy, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Glycated Hemoglobin A, Haplotypes, Humans, Male, Mitochondria, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Risk Factors, United States
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2018
Purpose - We previously demonstrated an association between European mitochondrial haplogroups and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). The purpose of this study was to determine how the relationship between these haplogroups and both diabetes duration and hyperglycemia, two major risk factors for diabetic retinopathy (DR), affect PDR prevalence.
Methods - Our population consisted of patients with type 2 diabetes with (n = 377) and without (n = 480) DR. A Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare diabetes duration and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) among mitochondrial haplogroups. Logistic regressions were performed to investigate diabetes duration and HbA1c as risk factors for PDR in the context of European mitochondrial haplogroups.
Results - Neither diabetes duration nor HbA1c differed among mitochondrial haplogroups. Among DR patients from haplogroup H, longer diabetes duration and increasing HbA1c were significant risk factors for PDR (P = 0.0001 and P = 0.011, respectively). Neither diabetes duration nor HbA1c was a significant risk factor for PDR in DR patients from haplogroup UK.
Conclusions - European mitochondrial haplogroups modify the effects of diabetes duration and HbA1c on PDR risk in patients with type 2 diabetes. In our patient population, longer diabetes duration and higher HbA1c increased PDR risk in patients from haplogroup H, but did not affect PDR risk in patients from haplogroup UK. This relationship has not been previously demonstrated and may explain, in part, why some patients with nonproliferative DR develop PDR and others do not, despite similar diabetes duration and glycemic control.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
16 MeSH Terms
Sequence data and association statistics from 12,940 type 2 diabetes cases and controls.
Flannick J, Fuchsberger C, Mahajan A, Teslovich TM, Agarwala V, Gaulton KJ, Caulkins L, Koesterer R, Ma C, Moutsianas L, McCarthy DJ, Rivas MA, Perry JRB, Sim X, Blackwell TW, Robertson NR, Rayner NW, Cingolani P, Locke AE, Tajes JF, Highland HM, Dupuis J, Chines PS, Lindgren CM, Hartl C, Jackson AU, Chen H, Huyghe JR, van de Bunt M, Pearson RD, Kumar A, Müller-Nurasyid M, Grarup N, Stringham HM, Gamazon ER, Lee J, Chen Y, Scott RA, Below JE, Chen P, Huang J, Go MJ, Stitzel ML, Pasko D, Parker SCJ, Varga TV, Green T, Beer NL, Day-Williams AG, Ferreira T, Fingerlin T, Horikoshi M, Hu C, Huh I, Ikram MK, Kim BJ, Kim Y, Kim YJ, Kwon MS, Lee J, Lee S, Lin KH, Maxwell TJ, Nagai Y, Wang X, Welch RP, Yoon J, Zhang W, Barzilai N, Voight BF, Han BG, Jenkinson CP, Kuulasmaa T, Kuusisto J, Manning A, Ng MCY, Palmer ND, Balkau B, Stančáková A, Abboud HE, Boeing H, Giedraitis V, Prabhakaran D, Gottesman O, Scott J, Carey J, Kwan P, Grant G, Smith JD, Neale BM, Purcell S, Butterworth AS, Howson JMM, Lee HM, Lu Y, Kwak SH, Zhao W, Danesh J, Lam VKL, Park KS, Saleheen D, So WY, Tam CHT, Afzal U, Aguilar D, Arya R, Aung T, Chan E, Navarro C, Cheng CY, Palli D, Correa A, Curran JE, Rybin D, Farook VS, Fowler SP, Freedman BI, Griswold M, Hale DE, Hicks PJ, Khor CC, Kumar S, Lehne B, Thuillier D, Lim WY, Liu J, Loh M, Musani SK, Puppala S, Scott WR, Yengo L, Tan ST, Taylor HA, Thameem F, Wilson G, Wong TY, Njølstad PR, Levy JC, Mangino M, Bonnycastle LL, Schwarzmayr T, Fadista J, Surdulescu GL, Herder C, Groves CJ, Wieland T, Bork-Jensen J, Brandslund I, Christensen C, Koistinen HA, Doney ASF, Kinnunen L, Esko T, Farmer AJ, Hakaste L, Hodgkiss D, Kravic J, Lyssenko V, Hollensted M, Jørgensen ME, Jørgensen T, Ladenvall C, Justesen JM, Käräjämäki A, Kriebel J, Rathmann W, Lannfelt L, Lauritzen T, Narisu N, Linneberg A, Melander O, Milani L, Neville M, Orho-Melander M, Qi L, Qi Q, Roden M, Rolandsson O, Swift A, Rosengren AH, Stirrups K, Wood AR, Mihailov E, Blancher C, Carneiro MO, Maguire J, Poplin R, Shakir K, Fennell T, DePristo M, de Angelis MH, Deloukas P, Gjesing AP, Jun G, Nilsson P, Murphy J, Onofrio R, Thorand B, Hansen T, Meisinger C, Hu FB, Isomaa B, Karpe F, Liang L, Peters A, Huth C, O'Rahilly SP, Palmer CNA, Pedersen O, Rauramaa R, Tuomilehto J, Salomaa V, Watanabe RM, Syvänen AC, Bergman RN, Bharadwaj D, Bottinger EP, Cho YS, Chandak GR, Chan JC, Chia KS, Daly MJ, Ebrahim SB, Langenberg C, Elliott P, Jablonski KA, Lehman DM, Jia W, Ma RCW, Pollin TI, Sandhu M, Tandon N, Froguel P, Barroso I, Teo YY, Zeggini E, Loos RJF, Small KS, Ried JS, DeFronzo RA, Grallert H, Glaser B, Metspalu A, Wareham NJ, Walker M, Banks E, Gieger C, Ingelsson E, Im HK, Illig T, Franks PW, Buck G, Trakalo J, Buck D, Prokopenko I, Mägi R, Lind L, Farjoun Y, Owen KR, Gloyn AL, Strauch K, Tuomi T, Kooner JS, Lee JY, Park T, Donnelly P, Morris AD, Hattersley AT, Bowden DW, Collins FS, Atzmon G, Chambers JC, Spector TD, Laakso M, Strom TM, Bell GI, Blangero J, Duggirala R, Tai ES, McVean G, Hanis CL, Wilson JG, Seielstad M, Frayling TM, Meigs JB, Cox NJ, Sladek R, Lander ES, Gabriel S, Mohlke KL, Meitinger T, Groop L, Abecasis G, Scott LJ, Morris AP, Kang HM, Altshuler D, Burtt NP, Florez JC, Boehnke M, McCarthy MI
(2017) Sci Data 4: 170179
MeSH Terms: Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, European Continental Ancestry Group, Genetic Variation, Humans
Show Abstract · Added December 20, 2017
To investigate the genetic basis of type 2 diabetes (T2D) to high resolution, the GoT2D and T2D-GENES consortia catalogued variation from whole-genome sequencing of 2,657 European individuals and exome sequencing of 12,940 individuals of multiple ancestries. Over 27M SNPs, indels, and structural variants were identified, including 99% of low-frequency (minor allele frequency [MAF] 0.1-5%) non-coding variants in the whole-genome sequenced individuals and 99.7% of low-frequency coding variants in the whole-exome sequenced individuals. Each variant was tested for association with T2D in the sequenced individuals, and, to increase power, most were tested in larger numbers of individuals (>80% of low-frequency coding variants in ~82 K Europeans via the exome chip, and ~90% of low-frequency non-coding variants in ~44 K Europeans via genotype imputation). The variants, genotypes, and association statistics from these analyses provide the largest reference to date of human genetic information relevant to T2D, for use in activities such as T2D-focused genotype imputation, functional characterization of variants or genes, and other novel analyses to detect associations between sequence variation and T2D.
0 Communities
2 Members
0 Resources
4 MeSH Terms
Genome-wide association study of coronary artery calcified atherosclerotic plaque in African Americans with type 2 diabetes.
Divers J, Palmer ND, Langefeld CD, Brown WM, Lu L, Hicks PJ, Smith SC, Xu J, Terry JG, Register TC, Wagenknecht LE, Parks JS, Ma L, Chan GC, Buxbaum SG, Correa A, Musani S, Wilson JG, Taylor HA, Bowden DW, Carr JJ, Freedman BI
(2017) BMC Genet 18: 105
MeSH Terms: African Americans, Coronary Vessels, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Genome-Wide Association Study, Genotype, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Plaque, Atherosclerotic, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Prevalence, United States, Vascular Calcification
Show Abstract · Added December 13, 2017
BACKGROUND - Coronary artery calcified atherosclerotic plaque (CAC) predicts cardiovascular disease (CVD). Despite exposure to more severe conventional CVD risk factors, African Americans (AAs) are less likely to develop CAC, and when they do, have markedly lower levels than European Americans. Genetic factors likely contribute to the observed ethnic differences. To identify genes associated with CAC in AAs with type 2 diabetes (T2D), a genome-wide association study (GWAS) was performed using the Illumina 5 M chip in 691 African American-Diabetes Heart Study participants (AA-DHS), with replication in 205 Jackson Heart Study (JHS) participants with T2D. Genetic association tests were performed on the genotyped and 1000 Genomes-imputed markers separately for each study, and combined in a meta-analysis.
RESULTS - Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs11353135 (2q22.1), rs16879003 (6p22.3), rs5014012, rs58071836 and rs10244825 (all on chromosome 7), rs10918777 (9q31.2), rs13331874 (16p13.3) and rs4459623 (18q12.1) were associated with presence and/or quantity of CAC in the AA-DHS and JHS, with meta-analysis p-values ≤8.0 × 10. The strongest result in AA-DHS alone was rs6491315 in the 13q32.1 region (parameter estimate (SE) = -1.14 (0.20); p-value = 9.1 × 10). This GWAS peak replicated a previously reported AA-DHS CAC admixture signal (rs7492028, LOD score 2.8).
CONCLUSIONS - Genetic association between SNPs on chromosomes 2, 6, 7, 9, 16 and 18 and CAC were detected in AAs with T2D from AA-DHS and replicated in the JHS. These data support a role for genetic variation on these chromosomes as contributors to CAC in AAs with T2D, as well as to variation in CAC between populations of African and European ancestry.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
15 MeSH Terms
Local ancestry transitions modify snp-trait associations.
Fish AE, Crawford DC, Capra JA, Bush WS
(2018) Pac Symp Biocomput 23: 424-435
MeSH Terms: Adult, African Continental Ancestry Group, Chromosomes, Human, Computational Biology, Epistasis, Genetic, European Continental Ancestry Group, Evolution, Molecular, Gene Frequency, Genetics, Population, Genome-Wide Association Study, Haplotypes, Humans, Linear Models, Models, Genetic, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Recombination, Genetic
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Genomic maps of local ancestry identify ancestry transitions - points on a chromosome where recent recombination events in admixed individuals have joined two different ancestral haplotypes. These events bring together alleles that evolved within separate continential populations, providing a unique opportunity to evaluate the joint effect of these alleles on health outcomes. In this work, we evaluate the impact of genetic variants in the context of nearby local ancestry transitions within a sample of nearly 10,000 adults of African ancestry with traits derived from electronic health records. Genetic data was located using the Metabochip, and used to derive local ancestry. We develop a model that captures the effect of both single variants and local ancestry, and use it to identify examples where local ancestry transitions significantly interact with nearby variants to influence metabolic traits. In our most compelling example, we find that the minor allele of rs16890640 occuring on a European background with a downstream local ancestry transition to African ancestry results in significantly lower mean corpuscular hemoglobin and volume. This finding represents a new way of discovering genetic interactions, and is supported by molecular data that suggest changes to local ancestry may impact local chromatin looping.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
16 MeSH Terms