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AGA Technical Review on Gastric Intestinal Metaplasia-Epidemiology and Risk Factors.
Altayar O, Davitkov P, Shah SC, Gawron AJ, Morgan DR, Turner K, Mustafa RA
(2020) Gastroenterology 158: 732-744.e16
MeSH Terms: Ethnic Groups, European Continental Ancestry Group, Gastric Mucosa, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Humans, Metaplasia, Precancerous Conditions, Risk Factors, Stomach Neoplasms, United States
Added March 3, 2020
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11 MeSH Terms
Left Ventricular Mass at MRI and Long-term Risk of Cardiovascular Events: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA).
Kawel-Boehm N, Kronmal R, Eng J, Folsom A, Burke G, Carr JJ, Shea S, Lima JAC, Bluemke DA
(2019) Radiology 293: 107-114
MeSH Terms: Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Atherosclerosis, Cohort Studies, Comorbidity, Ethnic Groups, Female, Heart Failure, Heart Ventricles, Humans, Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Myocardial Infarction, Prospective Studies, Risk, Risk Factors, United States
Show Abstract · Added January 10, 2020
Background Few data exist on the long-term risk prediction of elevated left ventricular (LV) mass quantified by MRI for cardiovascular (CV) events in a contemporary, ethnically diverse cohort. Purpose To assess the long-term impact of elevated LV mass on CV events in a prospective cohort study of a multiethnic population in relationship to risk factors and coronary artery calcium (CAC) score. Materials and Methods The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, or MESA (: NCT00005487), is an ongoing prospective multicenter population-based study in the United States. A total of 6814 participants (age range, 45-84 years) free of clinical CV disease at baseline were enrolled between 2000 and 2002. In 4988 participants (2613 [52.4%] women; mean age, 62 years ± 10.1 [standard deviation]) followed over 15 years for CV events, LV mass was derived from cardiac MRI at baseline enrollment by using semiautomated software at a central core laboratory. Cox proportional hazard models, Kaplan-Meier curves, and scores were applied to assess the impact of LV hypertrophy. Results A total of 290 participants had hard coronary heart disease (CHD) events (207 myocardial infarctions [MIs], 95 CHD deaths), 57 had other CV disease-related deaths, and 215 had heart failure (HF). LV hypertrophy was an independent predictor of hard CHD events (hazard ratio [HR]: 2.7; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.9, 3.8), MI (HR: 2.8; 95% CI: 1.8, 4.0), CHD death (HR: 4.3; 95% CI: 2.5, 7.3), other CV death (HR: 7.5; 95% CI: 4.2, 13.5), and HF (HR: 5.4; 95% CI: 3.8, 7.5) ( < .001 for all end points). LV hypertrophy was a stronger predictor than CAC for CHD death, other CV death, and HF ( scores: 5.4 vs 3.4, 6.8 vs 2.4, and 9.7 vs 3.2 for LV hypertrophy vs CAC, respectively). Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated an increased risk of CV events in participants with LV hypertrophy, particularly after 5 years. Conclusion Elevated left ventricular mass was strongly associated with hard coronary heart disease events, other cardiovascular death, and heart failure over 15 years of follow-up, independent of traditional risk factors and coronary artery calcium score. © RSNA, 2019 See also the editorial by Hanneman in this issue.
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On Using Local Ancestry to Characterize the Genetic Architecture of Human Traits: Genetic Regulation of Gene Expression in Multiethnic or Admixed Populations.
Zhong Y, Perera MA, Gamazon ER
(2019) Am J Hum Genet 104: 1097-1115
MeSH Terms: Ethnic Groups, Gene Expression Regulation, Genetics, Population, Genome-Wide Association Study, Humans, Linkage Disequilibrium, Models, Genetic, Multifactorial Inheritance, Phenotype, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Quantitative Trait Loci
Show Abstract · Added July 17, 2019
Understanding the nature of the genetic regulation of gene expression promises to advance our understanding of the genetic basis of disease. However, the methodological impact of the use of local ancestry on high-dimensional omics analyses, including, most prominently, expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) mapping and trait heritability estimation, in admixed populations remains critically underexplored. Here, we develop a statistical framework that characterizes the relationships among the determinants of the genetic architecture of an important class of molecular traits. We provide a computationally efficient approach to local ancestry analysis in eQTL mapping while increasing control of type I and type II error over traditional approaches. Applying our method to National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) and Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) datasets, we show that the use of local ancestry can improve eQTL mapping in admixed and multiethnic populations, respectively. We estimate the trait variance explained by ancestry by using local admixture relatedness between individuals. By using simulations of diverse genetic architectures and degrees of confounding, we show improved accuracy in estimating heritability when accounting for local ancestry similarity. Furthermore, we characterize the sparse versus polygenic components of gene expression in admixed individuals. Our study has important methodological implications for genetic analysis of omics traits across a range of genomic contexts, from a single variant to a prioritized region to the entire genome. Our findings highlight the importance of using local ancestry to better characterize the heritability of complex traits and to more accurately map genetic associations.
Copyright © 2019 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Genome-Wide Association and Functional Studies Reveal Novel Pharmacological Mechanisms for Allopurinol.
Brackman DJ, Yee SW, Enogieru OJ, Shaffer C, Ranatunga D, Denny JC, Wei WQ, Kamatani Y, Kubo M, Roden DM, Jorgenson E, Giacomini KM
(2019) Clin Pharmacol Ther 106: 623-631
MeSH Terms: ATP Binding Cassette Transporter, Subfamily G, Member 2, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Allopurinol, Cytokines, Ethnic Groups, Female, Genome-Wide Association Study, Glucose Transport Proteins, Facilitative, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Neoplasm Proteins, Oxypurinol, Prognosis, Uric Acid
Show Abstract · Added March 24, 2020
Allopurinol, which lowers uric acid (UA) concentration, is increasingly being recognized for its benefits in cardiovascular and renal disease. However, response to allopurinol is variable. We gathered samples from 4,446 multiethnic subjects for a genome-wide association study of allopurinol response. Consistent with previous studies, we observed that the Q141K variant in ABCG2 (rs2231142), which encodes the efflux pump breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), associated with worse response to allopurinol. However, for the first time this association reached genome-wide level significance (P = 8.06 × 10 ). Additionally, we identified a novel association with a variant in GREM2 (rs1934341, P = 3.22 × 10 ). In vitro studies identified oxypurinol, the active metabolite of allopurinol, as an inhibitor of the UA transporter GLUT9, suggesting that oxypurinol may modulate UA reabsorption. These results provide strong evidence for a role of BCRP Q141K in allopurinol response, and suggest that allopurinol may have additional hypouricemic effects beyond xanthine oxidase inhibition.
© 2019 The Authors Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics © 2019 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.
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16 MeSH Terms
Functionally oriented analysis of cardiometabolic traits in a trans-ethnic sample.
Petty LE, Highland HM, Gamazon ER, Hu H, Karhade M, Chen HH, de Vries PS, Grove ML, Aguilar D, Bell GI, Huff CD, Hanis CL, Doddapaneni H, Munzy DM, Gibbs RA, Ma J, Parra EJ, Cruz M, Valladares-Salgado A, Arking DE, Barbeira A, Im HK, Morrison AC, Boerwinkle E, Below JE
(2019) Hum Mol Genet 28: 1212-1224
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Blood Pressure, Body Mass Index, Chromosome Mapping, Ethnic Groups, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Forecasting, Genetic Association Studies, Genome-Wide Association Study, Humans, Male, Metabolome, Middle Aged, Multifactorial Inheritance, Phenotype, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Transcriptome
Show Abstract · Added February 15, 2019
Interpretation of genetic association results is difficult because signals often lack biological context. To generate hypotheses of the functional genetic etiology of complex cardiometabolic traits, we estimated the genetically determined component of gene expression from common variants using PrediXcan (1) and determined genes with differential predicted expression by trait. PrediXcan imputes tissue-specific expression levels from genetic variation using variant-level effect on gene expression in transcriptome data. To explore the value of imputed genetically regulated gene expression (GReX) models across different ancestral populations, we evaluated imputed expression levels for predictive accuracy genome-wide in RNA sequence data in samples drawn from European-ancestry and African-ancestry populations and identified substantial predictive power using European-derived models in a non-European target population. We then tested the association of GReX on 15 cardiometabolic traits including blood lipid levels, body mass index, height, blood pressure, fasting glucose and insulin, RR interval, fibrinogen level, factor VII level and white blood cell and platelet counts in 15 755 individuals across three ancestry groups, resulting in 20 novel gene-phenotype associations reaching experiment-wide significance across ancestries. In addition, we identified 18 significant novel gene-phenotype associations in our ancestry-specific analyses. Top associations were assessed for additional support via query of S-PrediXcan (2) results derived from publicly available genome-wide association studies summary data. Collectively, these findings illustrate the utility of transcriptome-based imputation models for discovery of cardiometabolic effect genes in a diverse dataset.
© The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press.
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19 MeSH Terms
Trans-ethnic association study of blood pressure determinants in over 750,000 individuals.
Giri A, Hellwege JN, Keaton JM, Park J, Qiu C, Warren HR, Torstenson ES, Kovesdy CP, Sun YV, Wilson OD, Robinson-Cohen C, Roumie CL, Chung CP, Birdwell KA, Damrauer SM, DuVall SL, Klarin D, Cho K, Wang Y, Evangelou E, Cabrera CP, Wain LV, Shrestha R, Mautz BS, Akwo EA, Sargurupremraj M, Debette S, Boehnke M, Scott LJ, Luan J, Zhao JH, Willems SM, Thériault S, Shah N, Oldmeadow C, Almgren P, Li-Gao R, Verweij N, Boutin TS, Mangino M, Ntalla I, Feofanova E, Surendran P, Cook JP, Karthikeyan S, Lahrouchi N, Liu C, Sepúlveda N, Richardson TG, Kraja A, Amouyel P, Farrall M, Poulter NR, Understanding Society Scientific Group, International Consortium for Blood Pressure, Blood Pressure-International Consortium of Exome Chip Studies, Laakso M, Zeggini E, Sever P, Scott RA, Langenberg C, Wareham NJ, Conen D, Palmer CNA, Attia J, Chasman DI, Ridker PM, Melander O, Mook-Kanamori DO, Harst PV, Cucca F, Schlessinger D, Hayward C, Spector TD, Jarvelin MR, Hennig BJ, Timpson NJ, Wei WQ, Smith JC, Xu Y, Matheny ME, Siew EE, Lindgren C, Herzig KH, Dedoussis G, Denny JC, Psaty BM, Howson JMM, Munroe PB, Newton-Cheh C, Caulfield MJ, Elliott P, Gaziano JM, Concato J, Wilson PWF, Tsao PS, Velez Edwards DR, Susztak K, Million Veteran Program, O'Donnell CJ, Hung AM, Edwards TL
(2019) Nat Genet 51: 51-62
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Animals, Blood Pressure, Ethnic Groups, Female, Gene Expression, Genome-Wide Association Study, Humans, Kidney Tubules, Male, Mice, Middle Aged, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Transcriptome, Up-Regulation
Show Abstract · Added January 3, 2019
In this trans-ethnic multi-omic study, we reinterpret the genetic architecture of blood pressure to identify genes, tissues, phenomes and medication contexts of blood pressure homeostasis. We discovered 208 novel common blood pressure SNPs and 53 rare variants in genome-wide association studies of systolic, diastolic and pulse pressure in up to 776,078 participants from the Million Veteran Program (MVP) and collaborating studies, with analysis of the blood pressure clinical phenome in MVP. Our transcriptome-wide association study detected 4,043 blood pressure associations with genetically predicted gene expression of 840 genes in 45 tissues, and mouse renal single-cell RNA sequencing identified upregulated blood pressure genes in kidney tubule cells.
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15 MeSH Terms
Multi-ethnic genome-wide association study for atrial fibrillation.
Roselli C, Chaffin MD, Weng LC, Aeschbacher S, Ahlberg G, Albert CM, Almgren P, Alonso A, Anderson CD, Aragam KG, Arking DE, Barnard J, Bartz TM, Benjamin EJ, Bihlmeyer NA, Bis JC, Bloom HL, Boerwinkle E, Bottinger EB, Brody JA, Calkins H, Campbell A, Cappola TP, Carlquist J, Chasman DI, Chen LY, Chen YI, Choi EK, Choi SH, Christophersen IE, Chung MK, Cole JW, Conen D, Cook J, Crijns HJ, Cutler MJ, Damrauer SM, Daniels BR, Darbar D, Delgado G, Denny JC, Dichgans M, Dörr M, Dudink EA, Dudley SC, Esa N, Esko T, Eskola M, Fatkin D, Felix SB, Ford I, Franco OH, Geelhoed B, Grewal RP, Gudnason V, Guo X, Gupta N, Gustafsson S, Gutmann R, Hamsten A, Harris TB, Hayward C, Heckbert SR, Hernesniemi J, Hocking LJ, Hofman A, Horimoto ARVR, Huang J, Huang PL, Huffman J, Ingelsson E, Ipek EG, Ito K, Jimenez-Conde J, Johnson R, Jukema JW, Kääb S, Kähönen M, Kamatani Y, Kane JP, Kastrati A, Kathiresan S, Katschnig-Winter P, Kavousi M, Kessler T, Kietselaer BL, Kirchhof P, Kleber ME, Knight S, Krieger JE, Kubo M, Launer LJ, Laurikka J, Lehtimäki T, Leineweber K, Lemaitre RN, Li M, Lim HE, Lin HJ, Lin H, Lind L, Lindgren CM, Lokki ML, London B, Loos RJF, Low SK, Lu Y, Lyytikäinen LP, Macfarlane PW, Magnusson PK, Mahajan A, Malik R, Mansur AJ, Marcus GM, Margolin L, Margulies KB, März W, McManus DD, Melander O, Mohanty S, Montgomery JA, Morley MP, Morris AP, Müller-Nurasyid M, Natale A, Nazarian S, Neumann B, Newton-Cheh C, Niemeijer MN, Nikus K, Nilsson P, Noordam R, Oellers H, Olesen MS, Orho-Melander M, Padmanabhan S, Pak HN, Paré G, Pedersen NL, Pera J, Pereira A, Porteous D, Psaty BM, Pulit SL, Pullinger CR, Rader DJ, Refsgaard L, Ribasés M, Ridker PM, Rienstra M, Risch L, Roden DM, Rosand J, Rosenberg MA, Rost N, Rotter JI, Saba S, Sandhu RK, Schnabel RB, Schramm K, Schunkert H, Schurman C, Scott SA, Seppälä I, Shaffer C, Shah S, Shalaby AA, Shim J, Shoemaker MB, Siland JE, Sinisalo J, Sinner MF, Slowik A, Smith AV, Smith BH, Smith JG, Smith JD, Smith NL, Soliman EZ, Sotoodehnia N, Stricker BH, Sun A, Sun H, Svendsen JH, Tanaka T, Tanriverdi K, Taylor KD, Teder-Laving M, Teumer A, Thériault S, Trompet S, Tucker NR, Tveit A, Uitterlinden AG, Van Der Harst P, Van Gelder IC, Van Wagoner DR, Verweij N, Vlachopoulou E, Völker U, Wang B, Weeke PE, Weijs B, Weiss R, Weiss S, Wells QS, Wiggins KL, Wong JA, Woo D, Worrall BB, Yang PS, Yao J, Yoneda ZT, Zeller T, Zeng L, Lubitz SA, Lunetta KL, Ellinor PT
(2018) Nat Genet 50: 1225-1233
MeSH Terms: Atrial Fibrillation, Case-Control Studies, Ethnic Groups, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genome-Wide Association Study, Humans, Quantitative Trait Loci, Transcriptome
Show Abstract · Added March 24, 2020
Atrial fibrillation (AF) affects more than 33 million individuals worldwide and has a complex heritability. We conducted the largest meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for AF to date, consisting of more than half a million individuals, including 65,446 with AF. In total, we identified 97 loci significantly associated with AF, including 67 that were novel in a combined-ancestry analysis, and 3 that were novel in a European-specific analysis. We sought to identify AF-associated genes at the GWAS loci by performing RNA-sequencing and expression quantitative trait locus analyses in 101 left atrial samples, the most relevant tissue for AF. We also performed transcriptome-wide analyses that identified 57 AF-associated genes, 42 of which overlap with GWAS loci. The identified loci implicate genes enriched within cardiac developmental, electrophysiological, contractile and structural pathways. These results extend our understanding of the biological pathways underlying AF and may facilitate the development of therapeutics for AF.
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Cost Effectiveness of Gastric Cancer Screening According to Race and Ethnicity.
Saumoy M, Schneider Y, Shen N, Kahaleh M, Sharaiha RZ, Shah SC
(2018) Gastroenterology 155: 648-660
MeSH Terms: African Americans, Continental Population Groups, Cost-Benefit Analysis, Early Detection of Cancer, Ethnic Groups, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Gastroscopy, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Male, Markov Chains, Mass Screening, Middle Aged, Quality-Adjusted Life Years, Stomach Neoplasms, United States
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
BACKGROUND & AIMS - There are marked racial and ethnic differences in non-cardia gastric cancer prevalence within the United States. Although gastric cancer screening is recommended in some regions of high prevalence, screening is not routinely performed in the United States. Our objective was to determine whether selected non-cardia gastric cancer screening for high-risk races and ethnicities within the United States is cost effective.
METHODS - We developed a decision analytic Markov model with the base case of a 50-year-old person of non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, Hispanic, or Asian race or ethnicity. The cost effectiveness of a no-screening strategy (current standard) for non-cardia gastric cancer was compared with that of 2 endoscopic screening modalities initiated at the time of screening colonoscopy for colorectal cancer: upper esophagogastroduodenoscopy with biopsy examinations and continued surveillance only if intestinal metaplasia or more severe pathology is identified or esophagogastroduodenoscopy with biopsy examinations continued every 2 years even in the absence of identified pathology. We used prevalence rates, transition probabilities, costs, and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) from publications and public data sources. Outcome measures were reported in incremental cost-effectiveness ratios, with a willingness-to-pay threshold of $100,000/QALY.
RESULTS - Compared with biennial and no screening, screening esophagogastroduodenoscopy with continued surveillance only when indicated was cost effective for non-Hispanic blacks ($80,278/QALY), Hispanics ($76,070/QALY), and Asians ($71,451/QALY), but not for non-Hispanic whites ($122,428/QALY). The model was sensitive to intestinal metaplasia prevalence, transition rates from intestinal metaplasia to dysplasia to local and regional cancer, cost of endoscopy, and cost of resection (endoscopic or surgical).
CONCLUSIONS - Based on a decision analytic Markov model, endoscopic non-cardia gastric cancer screening for high-risk races and ethnicities could be cost effective in the United States.
Copyright © 2018 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Sequence-based HLA-A, B, C, DP, DQ, and DR typing of 714 adults from Colombo, Sri Lanka.
Grifoni A, Weiskopf D, Lindestam Arlehamn CS, Angelo M, Leary S, Sidney J, Frazier A, Phillips E, Mallal S, Mack SJ, Tippalagama R, Goonewardana S, Premawansa S, Premawansa G, Wijewickrama A, De Silva AD, Sette A
(2018) Hum Immunol 79: 87-88
MeSH Terms: Adult, Animals, Ethnic Groups, Female, Gene Frequency, Genotype, HLA-A Antigens, HLA-B Antigens, HLA-C Antigens, HLA-DP Antigens, HLA-DQ Antigens, HLA-DR Antigens, Healthy Volunteers, Histocompatibility Testing, Humans, Male, Mice, Sequence Analysis, DNA, Sri Lanka, T-Lymphocytes
Show Abstract · Added March 30, 2020
DNA sequence-based typing at the HLA-A, -B, -C, -DPB1, -DQA1, -DQB1, and -DRB1 loci was performed on 714 healthy adult blood bank donors from Colombo, Sri Lanka, to characterize allele frequencies in support of studies on T cell immunity against pathogens, including Dengue virus. Deviations from Hardy Weinberg proportions were not detected at any locus. Several alleles were found in >30% of individuals, including the class II alleles DPB1 * 04:01, DPB1 * 02:01, DQB1 * 06:01 and DRB1 * 07:01, and the class I alleles A * 33:03 and A * 24:02. Genotype data will be available in the Allele Frequencies Net Database.
Copyright © 2018 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Health disparities among adult patients with a phenotypic diagnosis of familial hypercholesterolemia in the CASCADE-FH™ patient registry.
Amrock SM, Duell PB, Knickelbine T, Martin SS, O'Brien EC, Watson KE, Mitri J, Kindt I, Shrader P, Baum SJ, Hemphill LC, Ahmed CD, Andersen RL, Kullo IJ, McCann D, Larry JA, Murray MF, Fishberg R, Guyton JR, Wilemon K, Roe MT, Rader DJ, Ballantyne CM, Underberg JA, Thompson P, Duffy D, Linton MF, Shapiro MD, Moriarty PM, Knowles JW, Ahmad ZS
(2017) Atherosclerosis 267: 19-26
MeSH Terms: Adult, African Americans, Aged, Asian Americans, Cardiovascular Diseases, Cholesterol, HDL, Cholesterol, LDL, Ethnic Groups, Female, Health Status Disparities, Healthcare Disparities, Humans, Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors, Hyperlipoproteinemia Type II, Male, Middle Aged, Multicenter Studies as Topic, Odds Ratio, Phenotype, Prospective Studies, Registries, Retrospective Studies, Risk Factors, Sex Factors
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2018
BACKGROUND AND AIMS - Most familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) patients remain undertreated, and it is unclear what role health disparities may play for FH patients in the US. We sought to describe sex and racial/ethnic disparities in a national registry of US FH patients.
METHODS - We analyzed data from 3167 adults enrolled in the CAscade SCreening for Awareness and DEtection of Familial Hypercholesterolemia (CASCADE-FH) registry. Logistic regression was used to evaluate for disparities in LDL-C goals and statin use, with adjustments for covariates including age, cardiovascular risk factors, and statin intolerance.
RESULTS - In adjusted analyses, women were less likely than men to achieve treated LDL-C of <100 mg/dL (OR 0.68, 95% CI, 0.57-0.82) or ≥50% reduction from pretreatment LDL-C (OR 0.79, 95% CI, 0.65-0.96). Women were less likely than men to receive statin therapy (OR, 0.60, 95% CI, 0.50-0.73) and less likely to receive a high-intensity statin (OR, 0.60, 95% CI, 0.49-0.72). LDL-C goal achievement also varied by race/ethnicity: compared with whites, Asians and blacks were less likely to achieve LDL-C levels <100 mg/dL (Asians, OR, 0.47, 95% CI, 0.24-0.94; blacks, OR, 0.49, 95% CI, 0.32-0.74) or ≥50% reduction from pretreatment LDL-C (Asians, OR 0.56, 95% CI, 0.32-0.98; blacks, OR 0.62, 95% CI, 0.43-0.90).
CONCLUSIONS - In a contemporary US population of FH patients, we identified differences in LDL-C goal attainment and statin usage after stratifying the population by either sex or race/ethnicity. Our findings suggest that health disparities contribute to the undertreatment of US FH patients. Increased efforts are warranted to raise awareness of these disparities.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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