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Bone corticalization requires local SOCS3 activity and is promoted by androgen action via interleukin-6.
Cho DC, Brennan HJ, Johnson RW, Poulton IJ, Gooi JH, Tonkin BA, McGregor NE, Walker EC, Handelsman DJ, Martin TJ, Sims NA
(2017) Nat Commun 8: 806
MeSH Terms: Androgens, Animals, Cancellous Bone, Chondrocytes, Dihydrotestosterone, Estradiol, Female, Interleukin-6, Male, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Osteogenesis, Ovariectomy, Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling 3 Protein
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
Long bone strength is determined by its outer shell (cortical bone), which forms by coalescence of thin trabeculae at the metaphysis (corticalization), but the factors that control this process are unknown. Here we show that SOCS3-dependent cytokine expression regulates bone corticalization. Young male and female Dmp1Cre.Socs3 mice, in which SOCS3 has been ablated in osteocytes, have high trabecular bone volume and poorly defined metaphyseal cortices. After puberty, male mice recover, but female corticalization is still impaired, leading to a lasting defect in bone strength. The phenotype depends on sex-steroid hormones: dihydrotestosterone treatment of gonadectomized female Dmp1Cre.Socs3 mice restores normal cortical morphology, whereas in males, estradiol treatment, or IL-6 deletion, recapitulates the female phenotype. This suggests that androgen action promotes metaphyseal corticalization, at least in part, via IL-6 signaling.The strength of long bones is determined by coalescence of trabeculae during corticalization. Here the authors show that this process is regulated by SOCS3 via a mechanism dependent on IL-6 and expression of sex hormones.
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Oestrogen inhibition reverses pulmonary arterial hypertension and associated metabolic defects.
Chen X, Austin ED, Talati M, Fessel JP, Farber-Eger EH, Brittain EL, Hemnes AR, Loyd JE, West J
(2017) Eur Respir J 50:
MeSH Terms: Anastrozole, Animals, Bone Morphogenetic Protein Receptors, Type II, Disease Models, Animal, Echocardiography, Estradiol, Estrogen Antagonists, Female, Fulvestrant, Hemodynamics, Humans, Hypertension, Pulmonary, Insulin Resistance, Lung, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Mutation, Nitriles, Signal Transduction, Tamoxifen, Triazoles
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Increased oestrogen is a strong epidemiological risk factor for development of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in patients, associated with metabolic defects. In addition, oestrogens drive penetrance in mice carrying mutations in bone morphogenetic protein receptor type II (BMPR2), the cause of most heritable PAH. The goal of the present study was to determine whether inhibition of oestrogens was effective in the treatment of PAH in these mice.The oestrogen inhibitors fulvestrant and anastrozole were used in a prevention and treatment paradigm in BMPR2 mutant mice, and tamoxifen was used for treatment. In addition, BMPR2 mutant mice were crossed onto oestrogen receptor (ESR)1 and ESR2 knockout backgrounds to assess receptor specificity. Haemodynamic and metabolic outcomes were measured.Oestrogen inhibition both prevented and treated PAH in BMPR2 mutant mice. This was associated with reduction in metabolic defects including oxidised lipid formation, insulin resistance and rescue of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ and CD36. The effect was mediated primarily through ESR2, but partially through ESR1.Our data suggest that trials of oestrogen inhibition in human PAH are warranted, and may improve pulmonary vascular disease through amelioration of metabolic defects. Although fulvestrant and anastrozole were more effective than tamoxifen, tamoxifen may be useful in premenopausal females, because of a reduced risk of induction of menopause.
Copyright ©ERS 2017.
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21 MeSH Terms
Estrogen enhances hippocampal gray-matter volume in young and older postmenopausal women: a prospective dose-response study.
Albert K, Hiscox J, Boyd B, Dumas J, Taylor W, Newhouse P
(2017) Neurobiol Aging 56: 1-6
MeSH Terms: Cognition, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Estradiol, Female, Gray Matter, Hippocampus, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Middle Aged, Neuroimaging, Organ Size, Postmenopause
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Estrogen administration following menopause has been shown to support hippocampally mediated cognitive processes. A number of previous studies have examined the effect of estrogen on hippocampal structure to determine the mechanism underlying estrogen effects on hippocampal function. However, these studies have been largely observational and provided inconsistent results. We examined the effect of short-term estradiol administration on hippocampal gray-matter volume in a prospective study with multiple doses of estradiol (placebo, 1 mg, and 2 mg). Following 3 months of estradiol administration, bilateral posterior hippocampal voxel-based gray-matter volume was increased in women who received 2-mg estradiol. There were no significant differences in total hippocampal volume and no significant effects on gray-matter volume in women who received placebo or 1-mg estradiol. These findings accord with previous animal studies and provide evidence of estrogen effects on hippocampal morphology that may represent a neurobiological mechanism for estrogen effects on cognition in postmenopausal women.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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12 MeSH Terms
F-Fluoroestradiol PET/CT Measurement of Estrogen Receptor Suppression during a Phase I Trial of the Novel Estrogen Receptor-Targeted Therapeutic GDC-0810: Using an Imaging Biomarker to Guide Drug Dosage in Subsequent Trials.
Wang Y, Ayres KL, Goldman DA, Dickler MN, Bardia A, Mayer IA, Winer E, Fredrickson J, Arteaga CL, Baselga J, Manning HC, Mahmood U, Ulaner GA
(2017) Clin Cancer Res 23: 3053-3060
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Biomarkers, Pharmacological, Breast Neoplasms, Cinnamates, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Estradiol, Estrogen Receptor alpha, Female, Fulvestrant, Humans, Indazoles, Middle Aged, Molecular Imaging, Molecular Targeted Therapy, Positron Emission Tomography Computed Tomography, Receptors, Estrogen, Tamoxifen
Show Abstract · Added April 6, 2017
Evaluate F-fluoroestradiol (FES) PET/CT as a biomarker of estrogen receptor (ER) occupancy and/or downregulation during phase I dose escalation of the novel ER targeting therapeutic GDC-0810 and help select drug dosage for subsequent clinical trials. In a phase I clinical trial of GDC-0810, patients with ER-positive metastatic breast cancer underwent FES PET/CT before beginning therapy and at cycle 2, day 3 of GDC-0810 therapy. Up to five target lesions were selected per patient, and FES standardized uptake value (SUV) corrected for background was recorded for each lesion pretherapy and on-therapy. Complete ER downregulation was defined as ≥90% decrease in FES SUV. The effect of prior tamoxifen and fulvestrant therapy on FES SUV was assessed. Of 30 patients who underwent paired FES-PET scans, 24 (80%) achieved ≥90% decrease in FES avidity, including 1 of 3 patients receiving 200 mg/day, 2 of 4 patients receiving 400 mg/day, 14 of 16 patients receiving 600 mg/day, and 7 of 7 patients receiving 800 mg/day. Withdrawal of tamoxifen 2 months prior to FES PET/CT and withdrawal of fulvestrant 6 months prior to FES PET/CT both appeared sufficient to prevent effects on FES SUV. A dosage of 600 mg GDC-0810 per day was selected for phase II in part due to decreases in FES SUV achieved in phase I. FES PET/CT was a useful biomarker of ER occupancy and/or downregulation in a phase I dose escalation trial of GDC-0810 and helped select the dosage of the ER antagonist/degrader for phase II trials. .
©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.
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18 MeSH Terms
Endogenous Estrogens, Estrogen Metabolites, and Breast Cancer Risk in Postmenopausal Chinese Women.
Moore SC, Matthews CE, Ou Shu X, Yu K, Gail MH, Xu X, Ji BT, Chow WH, Cai Q, Li H, Yang G, Ruggieri D, Boyd-Morin J, Rothman N, Hoover RN, Gao YT, Zheng W, Ziegler RG
(2016) J Natl Cancer Inst 108:
MeSH Terms: Aged, Asian Americans, Breast Neoplasms, Case-Control Studies, China, Estradiol, Estrogens, Estrone, Female, Humans, Incidence, Metabolic Networks and Pathways, Middle Aged, Odds Ratio, Postmenopause, United States
Show Abstract · Added May 4, 2017
BACKGROUND - The role of estrogen metabolism in determining breast cancer risk and differences in breast cancer rates between high-incidence and low-incidence nations is poorly understood.
METHODS - We measured urinary concentrations of estradiol and estrone (parent estrogens) and 13 estrogen metabolites formed by irreversible hydroxylation at the C-2, C-4, or C-16 positions of the steroid ring in a nested case-control study of 399 postmenopausal invasive breast cancer case participants and 399 matched control participants from the population-based Shanghai Women's Health Study cohort. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of breast cancer by quartiles of metabolic pathway groups, pathway ratios, and individual estrogens/estrogen metabolites were estimated by multivariable conditional logistic regression. Urinary estrogen/estrogen metabolite measures were compared with those of postmenopausal non-hormone-using Asian Americans, a population with three-fold higher breast cancer incidence rates. All statistical tests were two-sided.
RESULTS - Urinary concentrations of parent estrogens were strongly associated with breast cancer risk (ORQ4vsQ1 = 1.94, 95% CI = 1.21 to 3.12, Ptrend = .01). Of the pathway ratios, the 2-pathway:total estrogens/estrogen metabolites and 2-pathway:parent estrogens were inversely associated with risk (ORQ4vsQ1 = 0.57, 95% CI = 0.35 to 0.91, Ptrend = .03, and ORQ4vsQ1 = 0.61, 95% CI = 0.37 to 0.99, Ptrend = .04, respectively). After adjusting for parent estrogens, these associations remained clearly inverse but lost statistical significance (ORQ4vsQ1 = 0.65, 95% CI = 0.39 to 1.06, Ptrend = .12 and ORQ4vsQ1 = 0.76, 95% CI = 0.44 to 1.32, Ptrend = .28). The urinary concentration of all estrogens/estrogen metabolites combined in Asian American women was triple that in Shanghai women.
CONCLUSIONS - Lower urinary parent estrogen concentrations and more extensive 2-hydroxylation were each associated with reduced postmenopausal breast cancer risk in a low-risk nation. Markedly higher total estrogen/estrogen metabolite concentrations in postmenopausal United States women (Asian Americans) than in Shanghai women may partly explain higher breast cancer rates in the United States.
Published by Oxford University Press 2016. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the United States.
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16 MeSH Terms
Estrogen-cholinergic interactions: Implications for cognitive aging.
Newhouse P, Dumas J
(2015) Horm Behav 74: 173-85
MeSH Terms: Acetylcholine, Aged, Attention, Brain, Cholinergic Agents, Cholinergic Neurons, Cognition, Cognitive Aging, Estradiol, Estrogen Replacement Therapy, Female, Humans, Learning, Memory, Short-Term, Tamoxifen
Show Abstract · Added February 22, 2016
This article is part of a Special Issue "Estradiol and Cognition". While many studies in humans have investigated the effects of estrogen and hormone therapy on cognition, potential neurobiological correlates of these effects have been less well studied. An important site of action for estrogen in the brain is the cholinergic system. Several decades of research support the critical role of CNS cholinergic systems in cognition in humans, particularly in learning and memory formation and attention. In humans, the cholinergic system has been implicated in many aspects of cognition including the partitioning of attentional resources, working memory, inhibition of irrelevant information, and improved performance on effort-demanding tasks. Studies support the hypothesis that estradiol helps to maintain aspects of attention and verbal and visual memory. Such cognitive domains are exactly those modulated by cholinergic systems and extensive basic and preclinical work over the past several decades has clearly shown that basal forebrain cholinergic systems are dependent on estradiol support for adequate functioning. This paper will review recent human studies from our laboratories and others that have extended preclinical research examining estrogen-cholinergic interactions to humans. Studies examined include estradiol and cholinergic antagonist reversal studies in normal older women, examinations of the neural representations of estrogen-cholinergic interactions using functional brain imaging, and studies of the ability of selective estrogen receptor modulators such as tamoxifen to interact with cholinergic-mediated cognitive performance. We also discuss the implications of these studies for the underlying hypotheses of cholinergic-estrogen interactions and cognitive aging, and indications for prophylactic and therapeutic potential that may exploit these effects.
Published by Elsevier Inc.
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15 MeSH Terms
Decreased LRIG1 in fulvestrant-treated luminal breast cancer cells permits ErbB3 upregulation and increased growth.
Morrison MM, Williams MM, Vaught DB, Hicks D, Lim J, McKernan C, Aurisicchio L, Ciliberto G, Simion C, Sweeney C, Cook RS
(2016) Oncogene 35: 1143-52
MeSH Terms: Animals, Breast Neoplasms, Cell Proliferation, Disease-Free Survival, Drug Resistance, Neoplasm, Estradiol, Estrogen Receptor alpha, Estrogens, Female, Fulvestrant, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Humans, MCF-7 Cells, Membrane Glycoproteins, Mice, Receptor, ErbB-3, Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
Show Abstract · Added April 15, 2019
ErbB3, a member of the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases, is a potent activator of phosphatidyl inositol-3 kinase (PI3K) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling, driving tumor cell survival and therapeutic resistance in breast cancers. In luminal breast cancers, ErbB3 upregulation following treatment with the antiestrogen fulvestrant enhances PI3K/mTOR-mediated cell survival. However, the mechanism by which ErbB3 is upregulated in fulvestrant-treated cells is unknown. We found that ErbB3 protein levels and cell surface presentation were increased following fulvestrant treatment, focusing our attention on proteins that regulate ErbB3 at the cell surface, including Nrdp1, NEDD4 and LRIG1. Among these, only LRIG1 correlated positively with ERα, but inversely with ErbB3 in clinical breast cancer data sets. LRIG1, an estrogen-inducible ErbB downregulator, was decreased in a panel of fulvestrant-treated luminal breast cancer cells. Ectopic LRIG1 expression from an estrogen-independent promoter uncoupled LRIG1 from estrogen regulation, thus sustaining LRIG1 and maintaining low ErbB3 levels in fulvestrant-treated cells. An LRIG1 mutant lacking the ErbB3 interaction motif was insufficient to downregulate ErbB3. Importantly, LRIG1 overexpression improved fulvestrant-mediated growth inhibition, whereas cells expressing the LRIG1 mutant were poorly sensitive to fulvestrant, despite effective ERα downregulation. Consistent with these results, LRIG1 expression correlated positively with increased disease-free survival in antiestrogen-treated breast cancer patients. These data suggest that ERα-dependent expression of LRIG1 dampens ErbB3 signaling in luminal breast cancer cells, and by blocking ERα activity with fulvestrant, LRIG1 is decreased thus permitting ErbB3 accumulation, enhanced ErbB3 signaling to cell survival pathways and blunting therapeutic response to fulvestrant.
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Estradiol levels modulate brain activity and negative responses to psychosocial stress across the menstrual cycle.
Albert K, Pruessner J, Newhouse P
(2015) Psychoneuroendocrinology 59: 14-24
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Affect, Brain, Brain Mapping, Cross-Sectional Studies, Estradiol, Female, Humans, Hydrocortisone, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Menstrual Cycle, Middle Aged, Saliva, Stress, Psychological, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added February 22, 2016
Although ovarian hormones are thought to have a potential role in the well-known sex difference in mood and anxiety disorders, the mechanisms through which ovarian hormone changes contribute to stress regulation are not well understood. One mechanism by which ovarian hormones might impact mood regulation is by mediating the effect of psychosocial stress, which often precedes depressive episodes and may have mood consequences that are particularly relevant in women. In the current study, brain activity and mood response to psychosocial stress was examined in healthy, normally cycling women at either the high or low estradiol phase of the menstrual cycle. Twenty eight women were exposed to the Montreal Imaging Stress Task (MIST), with brain activity determined through functional magnetic resonance imaging, and behavioral response assessed with subjective mood and stress measures. Brain activity responses to psychosocial stress differed between women in the low versus high estrogen phase of the menstrual cycle: women with high estradiol levels showed significantly less deactivation in limbic regions during psychosocial stress compared to women with low estradiol levels. Additionally, women with higher estradiol levels also had less subjective distress in response to the MIST than women with lower estradiol levels. The results of this study suggest that, in normally cycling premenopausal women, high estradiol levels attenuate the brain activation changes and negative mood response to psychosocial stress. Normal ovarian hormone fluctuations may alter the impact of psychosocially stressful events by presenting periods of increased vulnerability to psychosocial stress during low estradiol phases of the menstrual cycle. This menstrual cycle-related fluctuation in stress vulnerability may be relevant to the greater risk for affective disorder or post-traumatic stress disorder in women.
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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16 MeSH Terms
Estrogen, Stress, and Depression: A Neurocognitive Model.
Newhouse P, Albert K
(2015) JAMA Psychiatry 72: 727-9
MeSH Terms: Depression, Depressive Disorder, Estradiol, Estrogens, Female, Humans, Perimenopause
Added February 22, 2016
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7 MeSH Terms
Kinome-wide functional screen identifies role of PLK1 in hormone-independent, ER-positive breast cancer.
Bhola NE, Jansen VM, Bafna S, Giltnane JM, Balko JM, Estrada MV, Meszoely I, Mayer I, Abramson V, Ye F, Sanders M, Dugger TC, Allen EV, Arteaga CL
(2015) Cancer Res 75: 405-14
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols, Breast Neoplasms, Cell Cycle Proteins, Drug Synergism, Estradiol, Estrogen Receptor alpha, Female, Fulvestrant, Humans, MCF-7 Cells, Mice, Mice, Nude, Neoplasms, Hormone-Dependent, Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases, Proto-Oncogene Proteins, Pteridines, RNA, Small Interfering, Random Allocation, Transcription Factors, Transcription, Genetic, Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays, bcl-X Protein
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
Estrogen receptor (ER) α-positive breast cancers initially respond to antiestrogens but eventually become estrogen independent and recur. ER(+) breast cancer cells resistant to long-term estrogen deprivation (LTED) exhibit hormone-independent ER transcriptional activity and growth. A kinome-wide siRNA screen using a library targeting 720 kinases identified Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) as one of the top genes whose downregulation resulted in inhibition of estrogen-independent ER transcriptional activity and growth of LTED cells. High PLK1 mRNA and protein correlated with a high Ki-67 score in primary ER(+) breast cancers after treatment with the aromatase inhibitor letrozole. RNAi-mediated knockdown of PLK1 inhibited ER expression, estrogen-independent growth, and ER transcription in MCF7 and HCC1428 LTED cells. Pharmacologic inhibition of PLK1 with volasertib, a small-molecule ATP-competitive PLK1 inhibitor, decreased LTED cell growth, ER transcriptional activity, and ER expression. Volasertib in combination with the ER antagonist, fulvestrant, decreased MCF7 xenograft growth in ovariectomized mice more potently than each drug alone. JUNB, a component of the AP-1 complex, was expressed 16-fold higher in MCF7/LTED compared with parental MCF7 cells. Furthermore, JUNB and BCL2L1 (which encodes antiapoptotic BCL-xL) mRNA levels were markedly reduced upon volasertib treatment in MCF7/LTED cells, while they were increased in parental MCF7 cells. Finally, JUNB knockdown decreased ER expression and transcriptional activity in MCF7/LTED cells, suggesting that PLK1 drives ER expression and estrogen-independent growth via JUNB. These data support a critical role of PLK1 in acquired hormone-independent growth of ER(+) human breast cancer and is therefore a promising target in tumors that have escaped estrogen deprivation therapy.
©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.
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23 MeSH Terms