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Cuts Both Ways: Proteases Modulate Virulence of Enterohemorrhagic .
Palmer LD, Skaar EP
(2019) MBio 10:
MeSH Terms: Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli, Escherichia coli Proteins, Humans, Microbiota, Peptide Hydrolases, Virulence
Show Abstract · Added April 2, 2019
Enterohemorrhagic (EHEC) is a major cause of foodborne gastrointestinal illness. EHEC uses a specialized type III secretion system (T3SS) to form attaching and effacing lesions in the colonic epithelium and outcompete commensal gut microbiota to cause disease. A recent report in (E. A. Cameron, M. M. Curtis, A. Kumar, G. M. Dunny, et al., mBio 9:e02204-18, 2018, https://doi.org/10.1128/mBio.02204-18) describes a new role for gut commensals in potentiating disease caused by EHEC. Proteases produced by EHEC and the prevalent human commensal cleave proteins in the EHEC T3SS translocon that modulate T3SS function. protease activity promotes translocation of bacterial effectors required for lesion formation. These results describe a new role for the microbiota in gastrointestinal disease that could uncover future treatments to prevent the spread of gastroenteritis.
Copyright © 2019 Palmer and Skaar.
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Micro-Data-Independent Acquisition for High-Throughput Proteomics and Sensitive Peptide Mass Spectrum Identification.
Heaven MR, Cobbs AL, Nei YW, Gutierrez DB, Herren AW, Gunawardena HP, Caprioli RM, Norris JL
(2018) Anal Chem 90: 8905-8911
MeSH Terms: Algorithms, Chromatography, Liquid, Databases, Protein, Escherichia coli, Escherichia coli Proteins, HeLa Cells, High-Throughput Screening Assays, Humans, Peptides, Proteome, Proteomics, Software, Tandem Mass Spectrometry, Workflow
Show Abstract · Added August 27, 2018
State-of-the-art strategies for proteomics are not able to rapidly interrogate complex peptide mixtures in an untargeted manner with sensitive peptide and protein identification rates. We describe a data-independent acquisition (DIA) approach, microDIA (μDIA), that applies a novel tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) mass spectral deconvolution method to increase the specificity of tandem mass spectra acquired during proteomics experiments. Using the μDIA approach with a 10 min liquid chromatography gradient allowed detection of 3.1-fold more HeLa proteins than the results obtained from data-dependent acquisition (DDA) of the same samples. Additionally, we found the μDIA MS/MS deconvolution procedure is critical for resolving modified peptides with relatively small precursor mass shifts that cause the same peptide sequence in modified and unmodified forms to theoretically cofragment in the same raw MS/MS spectra. The μDIA workflow is implemented in the PROTALIZER software tool which fully automates tandem mass spectral deconvolution, queries every peptide with a library-free search algorithm against a user-defined protein database, and confidently identifies multiple peptides in a single tandem mass spectrum. We also benchmarked μDIA against DDA using a 90 min gradient analysis of HeLa and Escherichia coli peptides that were mixed in predefined quantitative ratios, and our results showed μDIA provided 24% more true positives at the same false positive rate.
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14 MeSH Terms
Crystal structure of an assembly intermediate of respiratory Complex II.
Sharma P, Maklashina E, Cecchini G, Iverson TM
(2018) Nat Commun 9: 274
MeSH Terms: Crystallography, X-Ray, Electron Transport Complex II, Escherichia coli, Escherichia coli Proteins, Flavin-Adenine Dinucleotide, Oxidoreductases
Show Abstract · Added April 1, 2019
Flavin is covalently attached to the protein scaffold in ~10% of flavoenzymes. However, the mechanism of covalent modification is unclear, due in part to challenges in stabilizing assembly intermediates. Here, we capture the structure of an assembly intermediate of the Escherichia coli Complex II (quinol:fumarate reductase (FrdABCD)). The structure contains the E. coli FrdA subunit bound to covalent FAD and crosslinked with its assembly factor, SdhE. The structure contains two global conformational changes as compared to prior structures of the mature protein: the rotation of a domain within the FrdA subunit, and the destabilization of two large loops of the FrdA subunit, which may create a tunnel to the active site. We infer a mechanism for covalent flavinylation. As supported by spectroscopic and kinetic analyses, we suggest that SdhE shifts the conformational equilibrium of the FrdA active site to disfavor succinate/fumarate interconversion and enhance covalent flavinylation.
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Dodecyl-β-melibioside Detergent Micelles as a Medium for Membrane Proteins.
Hutchison JM, Lu Z, Li GC, Travis B, Mittal R, Deatherage CL, Sanders CR
(2017) Biochemistry 56: 5481-5484
MeSH Terms: Amyloid beta-Protein Precursor, Detergents, Diacylglycerol Kinase, Disaccharides, Dynamic Light Scattering, Enzyme Stability, Escherichia coli Proteins, Glucosides, Glycolipids, Hot Temperature, Humans, Micelles, Myelin Proteins, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Biomolecular, Particle Size, Peptide Fragments, Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs, Protein Stability, Receptor, Notch1
Show Abstract · Added November 21, 2018
There remains a need for new non-ionic detergents that are suitable for use in biochemical and biophysical studies of membrane proteins. Here we explore the properties of n-dodecyl-β-melibioside (β-DDMB) micelles as a medium for membrane proteins. Melibiose is d-galactose-α(1→6)-d-glucose. Light scattering showed the β-DDMB micelle to be roughly 30 kDa smaller than micelles formed by the commonly used n-dodecyl-β-maltoside (β-DDM). β-DDMB stabilized diacylglycerol kinase (DAGK) against thermal inactivation. Moreover, activity assays conducted using aliquots of DAGK purified into β-DDMB yielded activities that were 40% higher than those of DAGK purified into β-DDM. β-DDMB yielded similar or better TROSY-HSQC NMR spectra for two single-pass membrane proteins and the tetraspan membrane protein peripheral myelin protein 22. β-DDMB appears be a useful addition to the toolbox of non-ionic detergents available for membrane protein research.
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Structural and biochemical analyses reveal insights into covalent flavinylation of the Complex II homolog quinol:fumarate reductase.
Starbird CA, Maklashina E, Sharma P, Qualls-Histed S, Cecchini G, Iverson TM
(2017) J Biol Chem 292: 12921-12933
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Substitution, Biocatalysis, Crystallography, X-Ray, Enzyme Stability, Escherichia coli, Escherichia coli Proteins, Flavin-Adenine Dinucleotide, Gene Deletion, Glutamic Acid, Hot Temperature, Models, Molecular, Molecular Docking Simulation, Mutagenesis, Site-Directed, Mutation, Oxidoreductases, Protein Conformation, Protein Denaturation, Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs, Protein Multimerization, Protein Processing, Post-Translational, Protein Subunits, Recombinant Proteins, Structural Homology, Protein, Succinate Dehydrogenase
Show Abstract · Added April 1, 2019
The Complex II homolog quinol:fumarate reductase (QFR, FrdABCD) catalyzes the interconversion of fumarate and succinate at a covalently attached FAD within the FrdA subunit. The SdhE assembly factor enhances covalent flavinylation of Complex II homologs, but the mechanisms underlying the covalent attachment of FAD remain to be fully elucidated. Here, we explored the mechanisms of covalent flavinylation of the QFR FrdA subunit. Using a Δ strain, we show that the requirement for the assembly factor depends on the cellular redox environment. We next identified residues important for the covalent attachment and selected the FrdA residue, which contributes to proton shuttling during fumarate reduction, for detailed biophysical and structural characterization. We found that QFR complexes containing FrdA have a structure similar to that of the WT flavoprotein, but lack detectable substrate binding and turnover. In the context of the isolated FrdA subunit, the anticipated assembly intermediate during covalent flavinylation, FrdA variants had stability similar to that of WT FrdA, contained noncovalent FAD, and displayed a reduced capacity to interact with SdhE. However, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analysis of WT FrdA cross-linked to SdhE suggested that the FrdA residue is unlikely to contribute directly to the FrdA-SdhE protein-protein interface. We also found that no auxiliary factor is absolutely required for flavinylation, indicating that the covalent flavinylation is autocatalytic. We propose that multiple factors, including the SdhE assembly factor and bound dicarboxylates, stimulate covalent flavinylation by preorganizing the active site to stabilize the quinone-methide intermediate.
© 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.
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Purine Biosynthesis Metabolically Constrains Intracellular Survival of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli.
Shaffer CL, Zhang EW, Dudley AG, Dixon BREA, Guckes KR, Breland EJ, Floyd KA, Casella DP, Algood HMS, Clayton DB, Hadjifrangiskou M
(2017) Infect Immun 85:
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cytoplasm, Epithelial Cells, Escherichia coli Infections, Escherichia coli Proteins, Female, Humans, Mice, Mice, Inbred C3H, Purines, Urinary Bladder, Urinary Tract Infections, Uropathogenic Escherichia coli, Virulence
Show Abstract · Added November 3, 2016
The ability to de novo synthesize purines has been associated with the intracellular survival of multiple bacterial pathogens. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), the predominant cause of urinary tract infections, undergoes a transient intracellular lifestyle during which bacteria clonally expand into multicellular bacterial communities within the cytoplasm of bladder epithelial cells. Here, we characterized the contribution of the conserved de novo purine biosynthesis-associated locus cvpA-purF to UPEC pathogenesis. Deletion of cvpA-purF, or of purF alone, abolished de novo purine biosynthesis but did not impact bacterial adherence properties in vitro or in the bladder lumen. However, upon internalization by bladder epithelial cells, UPEC deficient in de novo purine biosynthesis was unable to expand into intracytoplasmic bacterial communities over time, unless it was extrachromosomally complemented. These findings indicate that UPEC is deprived of purine nucleotides within the intracellular niche and relies on de novo purine synthesis to meet this metabolic requirement.
Copyright © 2016 American Society for Microbiology.
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14 MeSH Terms
Dynamic Evolution of Nitric Oxide Detoxifying Flavohemoglobins, a Family of Single-Protein Metabolic Modules in Bacteria and Eukaryotes.
Wisecaver JH, Alexander WG, King SB, Hittinger CT, Rokas A
(2016) Mol Biol Evol 33: 1979-87
MeSH Terms: Adaptation, Biological, Amino Acid Sequence, Bacteria, Bacterial Proteins, Biological Evolution, Computational Biology, Databases, Nucleic Acid, Dihydropteridine Reductase, Escherichia coli Proteins, Eukaryota, Evolution, Molecular, Fungi, Gene Duplication, Gene Transfer, Horizontal, Hemeproteins, NADH, NADPH Oxidoreductases, Nitric Oxide, Phylogeny
Show Abstract · Added April 6, 2017
Due to their functional independence, proteins that comprise standalone metabolic units, which we name single-protein metabolic modules, may be particularly prone to gene duplication (GD) and horizontal gene transfer (HGT). Flavohemoglobins (flavoHbs) are prime examples of single-protein metabolic modules, detoxifying nitric oxide (NO), a ubiquitous toxin whose antimicrobial properties many life forms exploit, to nitrate, a common source of nitrogen for organisms. FlavoHbs appear widespread in bacteria and have been identified in a handful of microbial eukaryotes, but how the distribution of this ecologically and biomedically important protein family evolved remains unknown. Reconstruction of the evolutionary history of 3,318 flavoHb protein sequences covering the family's known diversity showed evidence of recurrent HGT at multiple evolutionary scales including intrabacterial HGT, as well as HGT from bacteria to eukaryotes. One of the most striking examples of HGT is the acquisition of a flavoHb by the dandruff- and eczema-causing fungus Malassezia from Corynebacterium Actinobacteria, a transfer that growth experiments show is capable of mediating NO resistance in fungi. Other flavoHbs arose via GD; for example, many filamentous fungi possess two flavoHbs that are differentially targeted to the cytosol and mitochondria, likely conferring protection against external and internal sources of NO, respectively. Because single-protein metabolic modules such as flavoHb function independently, readily undergo GD and HGT, and are frequently involved in organismal defense and competition, we suggest that they represent "plug-and-play" proteins for ecological arms races.
© The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
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18 MeSH Terms
Protonation-dependent conformational dynamics of the multidrug transporter EmrE.
Dastvan R, Fischer AW, Mishra S, Meiler J, Mchaourab HS
(2016) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 113: 1220-5
MeSH Terms: Antiporters, Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy, Escherichia coli Proteins, Models, Molecular, Protein Conformation, Protons, X-Ray Diffraction
Show Abstract · Added February 5, 2016
The small multidrug transporter from Escherichia coli, EmrE, couples the energetically uphill extrusion of hydrophobic cations out of the cell to the transport of two protons down their electrochemical gradient. Although principal mechanistic elements of proton/substrate antiport have been described, the structural record is limited to the conformation of the substrate-bound state, which has been shown to undergo isoenergetic alternating access. A central but missing link in the structure/mechanism relationship is a description of the proton-bound state, which is an obligatory intermediate in the transport cycle. Here we report a systematic spin labeling and double electron electron resonance (DEER) study that uncovers the conformational changes of EmrE subsequent to protonation of critical acidic residues in the context of a global description of ligand-induced structural rearrangements. We find that protonation of E14 leads to extensive rotation and tilt of transmembrane helices 1-3 in conjunction with repacking of loops, conformational changes that alter the coordination of the bound substrate and modulate its access to the binding site from the lipid bilayer. The transport model that emerges from our data posits a proton-bound, but occluded, resting state. Substrate binding from the inner leaflet of the bilayer releases the protons and triggers alternating access between inward- and outward-facing conformations of the substrate-loaded transporter, thus enabling antiport without dissipation of the proton gradient.
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7 MeSH Terms
Systematic evaluation of data-independent acquisition for sensitive and reproducible proteomics-a prototype design for a single injection assay.
Heaven MR, Funk AJ, Cobbs AL, Haffey WD, Norris JL, McCullumsmith RE, Greis KD
(2016) J Mass Spectrom 51: 1-11
MeSH Terms: Chromatography, Liquid, Escherichia coli, Escherichia coli Proteins, Flow Injection Analysis, Peptides, Proteome, Proteomics, Reproducibility of Results, Software, Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Show Abstract · Added August 17, 2016
Data-independent acquisition (DIA)-based proteomics has become increasingly complicated in recent years because of the vast number of workflows described, coupled with a lack of studies indicating a rational framework for selecting effective settings to use. To address this issue and provide a resource for the proteomics community, we compared 12 DIA methods that assay tryptic peptides using various mass-isolation windows. Our findings indicate that the most sensitive single injection LC-DIA method uses 6 m/z isolation windows to analyze the densely populated tryptic peptide range from 450 to 730 m/z, which allowed quantification of 4465 Escherichia coli peptides. In contrast, using the sequential windowed acquisition of all theoretical fragment-ions (SWATH) approach with 26 m/z isolation windows across the entire 400-1200 m/z range, allowed quantification of only 3309 peptides. This reduced sensitivity with 26 m/z windows is caused by an increase in co-eluting compounds with similar precursor values detected in the same tandem MS spectra, which lowers the signal-to-noise of peptide fragment-ion chromatograms and reduces the amount of low abundance peptides that can be quantified from 410 to 920 m/z. Above 920 m/z, more peptides were quantified with 26 m/z windows because of substantial peptide (13) C isotope distributions that parse peptide ions into separate isolation windows. Because reproducible quantification has been a long-standing aim of quantitative proteomics, and is a so-called trait of DIA, we sought to determine whether precursor-level chromatograms used in some methods rather than their fragment-level counterparts have similar precision. Our data show that extracted fragment-ion chromatograms are the reason DIA provides superior reproducibility. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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10 MeSH Terms
Characterization of the Domain Orientations of E. coli 5'-Nucleotidase by Fitting an Ensemble of Conformers to DEER Distance Distributions.
Krug U, Alexander NS, Stein RA, Keim A, Mchaourab HS, Sträter N, Meiler J
(2016) Structure 24: 43-56
MeSH Terms: 5'-Nucleotidase, Amino Acid Sequence, Escherichia coli, Escherichia coli Proteins, Molecular Dynamics Simulation, Molecular Sequence Data, Protein Structure, Tertiary
Show Abstract · Added February 5, 2016
Escherichia coli 5'-nucleotidase is a two-domain enzyme exhibiting a unique 96° domain motion that is required for catalysis. Here we present an integrated structural biology study that combines DEER distance distributions with structural information from X-ray crystallography and computational biology to describe the population of presumably almost isoenergetic open and closed states in solution. Ensembles of models that best represent the experimental distance distributions are determined by a Monte Carlo search algorithm. As a result, predominantly open conformations are observed in the unliganded state indicating that the majority of enzyme molecules await substrate binding for the catalytic cycle. The addition of a substrate analog yields ensembles with an almost equal mixture of open and closed states. Thus, in the presence of substrate, efficient catalysis is provided by the simultaneous appearance of open conformers (binding substrate or releasing product) and closed conformers (enabling the turnover of the substrate).
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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7 MeSH Terms