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In vitro safety pharmacology evaluation of 2-hydroxybenzylamine acetate.
Fuller JC, Pitchford LM, Morrison RD, Daniels JS, Flynn CR, Abumrad NN, Oates JA, Boutaud O, Rathmacher JA
(2018) Food Chem Toxicol 121: 541-548
MeSH Terms: Adult, Benzylamines, Blood Proteins, Cytochrome P-450 Enzyme System, ERG1 Potassium Channel, Erythrocytes, Female, Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic, Hepatocytes, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Mutagenicity Tests, Salmonella typhimurium
Show Abstract · Added April 15, 2019
2-hydroxybenzylamine (2-HOBA), a compound found in buckwheat, is a potent scavenger of reactive γ-ketoaldehydes, which are increased in diseases associated with inflammation and oxidative stress. While the potential of 2-HOBA is promising, studies were needed to characterize the safety of the compound before clinical trials. In a series of experiments, the risks of 2-HOBA-mediated mutagenicity and cardio-toxicity were assessed in vitro. The effects of 2-HOBA on the mRNA expression of select cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes were also assessed in cryopreserved human hepatocytes. Further, the distribution and metabolism of 2-HOBA in blood were determined. Our results indicate that 2-HOBA is not cytotoxic or mutagenic in vitro and does not induce the expression of CYP1A2, CYP2B6, or CYP3A4 in human hepatocytes. The results of the hERG testing showed a low risk of cardiac QT wave prolongation. Plasma protein binding and red blood cell distribution characteristics indicate low protein binding and no preferential distribution into erythrocytes. The major metabolites identified were salicylic acid and the glycoside conjugate of 2-HOBA. Together, these findings support development of 2-HOBA as a nutritional supplement and provide important information for the design of further preclinical safety studies in animals as well as for human clinical trials with 2-HOBA.
Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.
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Exome Genotyping Identifies Pleiotropic Variants Associated with Red Blood Cell Traits.
Chami N, Chen MH, Slater AJ, Eicher JD, Evangelou E, Tajuddin SM, Love-Gregory L, Kacprowski T, Schick UM, Nomura A, Giri A, Lessard S, Brody JA, Schurmann C, Pankratz N, Yanek LR, Manichaikul A, Pazoki R, Mihailov E, Hill WD, Raffield LM, Burt A, Bartz TM, Becker DM, Becker LC, Boerwinkle E, Bork-Jensen J, Bottinger EP, O'Donoghue ML, Crosslin DR, de Denus S, Dubé MP, Elliott P, Engström G, Evans MK, Floyd JS, Fornage M, Gao H, Greinacher A, Gudnason V, Hansen T, Harris TB, Hayward C, Hernesniemi J, Highland HM, Hirschhorn JN, Hofman A, Irvin MR, Kähönen M, Lange E, Launer LJ, Lehtimäki T, Li J, Liewald DC, Linneberg A, Liu Y, Lu Y, Lyytikäinen LP, Mägi R, Mathias RA, Melander O, Metspalu A, Mononen N, Nalls MA, Nickerson DA, Nikus K, O'Donnell CJ, Orho-Melander M, Pedersen O, Petersmann A, Polfus L, Psaty BM, Raitakari OT, Raitoharju E, Richard M, Rice KM, Rivadeneira F, Rotter JI, Schmidt F, Smith AV, Starr JM, Taylor KD, Teumer A, Thuesen BH, Torstenson ES, Tracy RP, Tzoulaki I, Zakai NA, Vacchi-Suzzi C, van Duijn CM, van Rooij FJ, Cushman M, Deary IJ, Velez Edwards DR, Vergnaud AC, Wallentin L, Waterworth DM, White HD, Wilson JG, Zonderman AB, Kathiresan S, Grarup N, Esko T, Loos RJ, Lange LA, Faraday N, Abumrad NA, Edwards TL, Ganesh SK, Auer PL, Johnson AD, Reiner AP, Lettre G
(2016) Am J Hum Genet 99: 8-21
MeSH Terms: African Americans, Allelic Imbalance, Erythrocyte Indices, Erythrocytes, Erythropoiesis, Exome, Gene Frequency, Genetic Pleiotropy, Genetic Variation, Genotype, Hematocrit, Hemoglobins, Humans, Quantitative Trait Loci
Show Abstract · Added April 26, 2017
Red blood cell (RBC) traits are important heritable clinical biomarkers and modifiers of disease severity. To identify coding genetic variants associated with these traits, we conducted meta-analyses of seven RBC phenotypes in 130,273 multi-ethnic individuals from studies genotyped on an exome array. After conditional analyses and replication in 27,480 independent individuals, we identified 16 new RBC variants. We found low-frequency missense variants in MAP1A (rs55707100, minor allele frequency [MAF] = 3.3%, p = 2 × 10(-10) for hemoglobin [HGB]) and HNF4A (rs1800961, MAF = 2.4%, p < 3 × 10(-8) for hematocrit [HCT] and HGB). In African Americans, we identified a nonsense variant in CD36 associated with higher RBC distribution width (rs3211938, MAF = 8.7%, p = 7 × 10(-11)) and showed that it is associated with lower CD36 expression and strong allelic imbalance in ex vivo differentiated human erythroblasts. We also identified a rare missense variant in ALAS2 (rs201062903, MAF = 0.2%) associated with lower mean corpuscular volume and mean corpuscular hemoglobin (p < 8 × 10(-9)). Mendelian mutations in ALAS2 are a cause of sideroblastic anemia and erythropoietic protoporphyria. Gene-based testing highlighted three rare missense variants in PKLR, a gene mutated in Mendelian non-spherocytic hemolytic anemia, associated with HGB and HCT (SKAT p < 8 × 10(-7)). These rare, low-frequency, and common RBC variants showed pleiotropy, being also associated with platelet, white blood cell, and lipid traits. Our association results and functional annotation suggest the involvement of new genes in human erythropoiesis. We also confirm that rare and low-frequency variants play a role in the architecture of complex human traits, although their phenotypic effect is generally smaller than originally anticipated.
Copyright © 2016 American Society of Human Genetics. All rights reserved.
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14 MeSH Terms
Staying on target with continuous dialysis.
Demirjian S, Fissell WH
(2015) Clin J Am Soc Nephrol 10: 7-8
MeSH Terms: 2,3-Diphosphoglycerate, Acute Kidney Injury, Erythrocytes, Female, Humans, Hypophosphatemia, Male, Renal Replacement Therapy
Added February 22, 2016
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8 MeSH Terms
Metabolomics of ADSOL (AS-1) red blood cell storage.
Roback JD, Josephson CD, Waller EK, Newman JL, Karatela S, Uppal K, Jones DP, Zimring JC, Dumont LJ
(2014) Transfus Med Rev 28: 41-55
MeSH Terms: Adenine, Animals, Blood Preservation, Cell Membrane, Chromatography, Liquid, Erythrocyte Transfusion, Erythrocytes, Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry, Glucose, Glycolysis, Humans, Kinetics, Lipids, Mannitol, Metabolome, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Oxidative Stress, Signal Transduction, Sodium Chloride, Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Show Abstract · Added March 20, 2014
Population-based investigations suggest that red blood cells (RBCs) are therapeutically effective when collected, processed, and stored for up to 42 days under validated conditions before transfusion. However, some retrospective clinical studies have shown worse patient outcomes when transfused RBCs have been stored for the longest times. Furthermore, studies of RBC persistence in the circulation after transfusion have suggested that considerable donor-to-donor variability exists and may affect transfusion efficacy. To understand the limitations of current blood storage technologies and to develop approaches to improve RBC storage and transfusion efficacy, we investigated the global metabolic alterations that occur when RBCs are stored in AS-1 (AS1-RBC). Leukoreduced AS1-RBC units prepared from 9 volunteer research donors (12 total donated units) were serially sampled for metabolomics analysis over 42 days of refrigerated storage. Samples were tested by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry, and specific biochemical compounds were identified by comparison to a library of purified standards. Over 3 experiments, 185 to 264 defined metabolites were quantified in stored RBC samples. Kinetic changes in these biochemicals confirmed known alterations in glycolysis and other pathways previously identified in RBCs stored in saline, adenine, glucose and mannitol solution (SAGM-RBC). Furthermore, we identified additional alterations not previously seen in SAGM-RBCs (eg, stable pentose phosphate pathway flux, progressive decreases in oxidized glutathione), and we delineated changes occurring in other metabolic pathways not previously studied (eg, S-adenosyl methionine cycle). These data are presented in the context of a detailed comparison with previous studies of SAGM-RBCs from human donors and murine AS1-RBCs. Global metabolic profiling of AS1-RBCs revealed a number of biochemical alterations in stored blood that may affect RBC viability during storage as well as therapeutic effectiveness of stored RBCs in transfusion recipients. These results provide future opportunities to more clearly pinpoint the metabolic defects during RBC storage, to identify biomarkers for donor screening and prerelease RBC testing, and to develop improved RBC storage solutions and methodologies.
Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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21 MeSH Terms
Oxidation of endogenous N-arachidonoylserotonin by human cytochrome P450 2U1.
Siller M, Goyal S, Yoshimoto FK, Xiao Y, Wei S, Guengerich FP
(2014) J Biol Chem 289: 10476-87
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Animals, Arachidonic Acids, Brain, Catalysis, Cattle, Chromatography, Liquid, Cytochrome P-450 Enzyme System, Cytochrome P450 Family 2, Erythrocytes, Escherichia coli, Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic, Humans, Indoles, Liver, Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Mass Spectrometry, Molecular Sequence Data, Oxygen, Polymerase Chain Reaction, Protein Binding, Proteomics, Sequence Homology, Amino Acid, Serotonin
Show Abstract · Added March 10, 2014
Cytochrome P450 (P450) 2U1 has been shown to be expressed, at the mRNA level, in human thymus, brain, and several other tissues. Recombinant P450 2U1 was purified and used as a reagent in a metabolomic search for substrates in bovine brain. In addition to fatty acid oxidation reactions, an oxidation of endogenous N-arachidonoylserotonin was characterized. Subsequent NMR and mass spectrometry and chemical synthesis showed that the main product was the result of C-2 oxidation of the indole ring, in contrast to other human P450s that generated different products. N-Arachidonoylserotonin, first synthesized chemically and described as an inhibitor of fatty acid amide hydrolase, had previously been found in porcine and mouse intestine; we demonstrated its presence in bovine and human brain samples. The product (2-oxo) was 4-fold less active than N-arachidonoylserotonin in inhibiting fatty acid amide hydrolase. The rate of oxidation of N-arachidonoylserotonin was similar to that of arachidonic acid, one of the previously identified fatty acid substrates of P450 2U1. The demonstration of the oxidation of N-arachidonoylserotonin by P450 2U1 suggests a possible role in human brain and possibly other sites.
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Connexin 36 mediates blood cell flow in mouse pancreatic islets.
Short KW, Head WS, Piston DW
(2014) Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 306: E324-31
MeSH Terms: Animals, Blood Glucose, Cell Tracking, Connexins, Erythrocytes, Insulin, Insulin Secretion, Islets of Langerhans, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Regional Blood Flow
Show Abstract · Added March 10, 2014
The insulin-secreting β-cells are contained within islets of Langerhans, which are highly vascularized. Blood cell flow rates through islets are glucose-dependent, even though there are no changes in blood cell flow within in the surrounding exocrine pancreas. This suggests a specific mechanism of glucose-regulated blood flow in the islet. Pancreatic islets respond to elevated glucose with synchronous pulses of electrical activity and insulin secretion across all β-cells in the islet. Connexin 36 (Cx36) gap junctions between islet β-cells mediate this synchronization, which is lost in Cx36 knockout mice (Cx36(-/-)). This leads to glucose intolerance in these mice, despite normal plasma insulin levels and insulin sensitivity. Thus, we sought to investigate whether the glucose-dependent changes in intraislet blood cell flow are also dependent on coordinated pulsatile electrical activity. We visualized and quantified blood cell flow using high-speed in vivo fluorescence imaging of labeled red blood cells and plasma. With the use of a live animal glucose clamp, blood cell flow was measured during either hypoglycemia (∼50 mg/dl) or hyperglycemia (∼300 mg/dl). In contrast to the large glucose-dependent islet blood velocity changes observed in wild-type mice, only minimal differences are observed in both Cx36(+/-) and Cx36(-/-) mice. This observation supports a novel model where intraislet blood cell flow is regulated by the coordinated electrical activity in the islet β-cells. Because Cx36 expression and function is reduced in type 2 diabetes, the resulting defect in intraislet blood cell flow regulation may also play a significant role in diabetic pathology.
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13 MeSH Terms
Isoprostane and isofuran lipid mediators accumulate in stored red blood cells and influence platelet function in vitro.
Spinelli SL, Lannan KL, Casey AE, Croasdell A, Curran TM, Henrichs KF, Pollock SJ, Milne GA, Refaai MA, Francis CW, Phipps RP, Blumberg N
(2014) Transfusion 54: 1569-79
MeSH Terms: Blood Platelets, Dinoprost, Erythrocytes, F2-Isoprostanes, Furans, Humans, Immunoassay, Isoprostanes, Reactive Oxygen Species
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2014
BACKGROUND - Stored red blood cells (RBCs) release hemoglobin (Hb) that leads to oxidative damage, which may contribute to thrombosis in susceptible transfusion recipients. Oxidative stress stimulates the generation of a new class of lipid mediators called F2 -isoprostanes (F2 -IsoPs) and isofurans (IsoFs) that influence cellular behavior. This study investigated RBC-derived F2 -IsoPs and IsoFs during storage and their influence on human platelets (PLTs).
STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS - F2 -IsoP and IsoF levels in RBC supernatants were measured by mass spectrometry during storage and after washing. The effects of stored supernatants, cell-free Hb, or a key F2 -IsoP, 8-iso-prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α ), on PLT function were examined in vitro.
RESULTS - F2 -IsoPs, IsoFs, and Hb accumulated in stored RBC supernatants. Prestorage leukoreduction reduced supernatant F2 -IsoPs and IsoFs levels, which increased again over storage time. Stored RBC supernatants and 8-iso-PGF2α induced PLT activation marker CD62P (P-selectin) expression and prothrombotic thromboxane A2 release. Cell-free Hb did not alter PLT mediator release, but did inhibit PLT spreading. Poststorage RBC washing reduced F2 -IsoP and IsoF levels up to 24 hours.
CONCLUSIONS - F2 -IsoPs and IsoFs are produced by stored RBCs and induce adverse effects on PLT function in vitro, supporting a potential novel role for bioactive lipids in adverse transfusion outcomes. F2 -IsoP and IsoF levels could be useful biomarkers for determining the suitability of blood components for transfusion. A novel finding is that cell-free Hb inhibits PLT spreading and could adversely influence wound healing. Poststorage RBC washing minimizes harmful lipid mediators, and its use could potentially reduce transfusion complications.
© 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.
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9 MeSH Terms
Brown Recluse spider bite mediated hemolysis: clinical features, a possible role for complement inhibitor therapy, and reduced RBC surface glycophorin A as a potential biomarker of venom exposure.
Gehrie EA, Nian H, Young PP
(2013) PLoS One 8: e76558
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized, Biomarkers, Brown Recluse Spider, CD55 Antigens, CD59 Antigens, Child, Complement System Proteins, Environmental Exposure, Erythrocytes, Female, Gene Expression Regulation, Glycophorin, Hemolysis, Humans, Immunoglobulin G, Male, Retrospective Studies, Spider Bites, Spider Venoms
Show Abstract · Added March 7, 2014
BACKGROUND - The venom of Loxosceles reclusa (Brown Recluse spider) can cause a severe, life-threatening hemolysis in humans for which no therapy is currently available in the USA beyond supportive measures. Because this hemolysis is uncommon, relatively little is known about its clinical manifestation, diagnosis, or management. Here, we aimed to clarify the clinical details of envenomation, to determine the efficacy of the complement inhibitor eculizumab to prevent the hemolysis in vitro, and to investigate markers of exposure to Brown Recluse venom.
STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS - We performed a 10-year chart review of cases of Brown Recluse spider bite-mediated hemolysis at our institution. We also designed an in vitro assay to test the efficacy of eculizumab to inhibit hemolysis of venom exposed red blood cells. Finally, we compared levels of CD55, CD59 and glycophorin A on venom exposed versus venom-naïve cells.
RESULTS - Most victims of severe Brown Recluse spider mediated hemolysis at our institution are children and follow an unpredictable clinical course. Brown Recluse spider bite mediated hemolysis is reduced by 79.2% (SD=18.8%) by eculizumab in vitro. Erythrocyte glycophorin A, but not CD55 or CD59, is reduced after red blood cells are incubated with venom in vitro.
CONCLUSION - Taken together, our laboratory data and clinical observations indicate that L. reclusa venom exposure results in non-specific antibody and complement fixation on red blood cells, resulting in complement mediated hemolysis that is curtailed by the complement inhibitor eculizumab in vitro. Glycophorin A measurement by flow cytometry may help to identify victims of L. reclusa envenomation.
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21 MeSH Terms
Genetic variants that confer resistance to malaria are associated with red blood cell traits in African-Americans: an electronic medical record-based genome-wide association study.
Ding K, de Andrade M, Manolio TA, Crawford DC, Rasmussen-Torvik LJ, Ritchie MD, Denny JC, Masys DR, Jouni H, Pachecho JA, Kho AN, Roden DM, Chisholm R, Kullo IJ
(2013) G3 (Bethesda) 3: 1061-8
MeSH Terms: African Americans, Disease Resistance, Electronic Health Records, Erythrocyte Count, Erythrocyte Indices, Erythrocytes, Genome-Wide Association Study, Hematocrit, Hemoglobins, Humans, Malaria
Show Abstract · Added March 7, 2014
To identify novel genetic loci influencing interindividual variation in red blood cell (RBC) traits in African-Americans, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in 2315 individuals, divided into discovery (n = 1904) and replication (n = 411) cohorts. The traits included hemoglobin concentration (HGB), hematocrit (HCT), RBC count, mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC). Patients were participants in the electronic MEdical Records and GEnomics (eMERGE) network and underwent genotyping of ~1.2 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms on the Illumina Human1M-Duo array. Association analyses were performed adjusting for age, sex, site, and population stratification. Three loci previously associated with resistance to malaria-HBB (11p15.4), HBA1/HBA2 (16p13.3), and G6PD (Xq28)-were associated (P ≤ 1 × 10(-6)) with RBC traits in the discovery cohort. The loci replicated in the replication cohort (P ≤ 0.02), and were significant at a genome-wide significance level (P < 5 × 10(-8)) in the combined cohort. The proportions of variance in RBC traits explained by significant variants at these loci were as follows: rs7120391 (near HBB) 1.3% of MCHC, rs9924561 (near HBA1/A2) 5.5% of MCV, 6.9% of MCH and 2.9% of MCHC, and rs1050828 (in G6PD) 2.4% of RBC count, 2.9% of MCV, and 1.4% of MCH, respectively. We were not able to replicate loci identified by a previous GWAS of RBC traits in a European ancestry cohort of similar sample size, suggesting that the genetic architecture of RBC traits differs by race. In conclusion, genetic variants that confer resistance to malaria are associated with RBC traits in African-Americans.
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Ex vivo red blood cell hemolysis assay for the evaluation of pH-responsive endosomolytic agents for cytosolic delivery of biomacromolecular drugs.
Evans BC, Nelson CE, Yu SS, Beavers KR, Kim AJ, Li H, Nelson HM, Giorgio TD, Duvall CL
(2013) J Vis Exp : e50166
MeSH Terms: Cytosol, Drug Carriers, Drug Delivery Systems, Endosomes, Erythrocyte Membrane, Erythrocytes, Hemolysis, Humans, Hydrogen-Ion Concentration, Lipid Bilayers, Lysosomes, Macromolecular Substances
Show Abstract · Added August 29, 2013
Phospholipid bilayers that constitute endo-lysosomal vesicles can pose a barrier to delivery of biologic drugs to intracellular targets. To overcome this barrier, a number of synthetic drug carriers have been engineered to actively disrupt the endosomal membrane and deliver cargo into the cytoplasm. Here, we describe the hemolysis assay, which can be used as rapid, high-throughput screen for the cytocompatibility and endosomolytic activity of intracellular drug delivery systems. In the hemolysis assay, human red blood cells and test materials are co-incubated in buffers at defined pHs that mimic extracellular, early endosomal, and late endo-lysosomal environments. Following a centrifugation step to pellet intact red blood cells, the amount of hemoglobin released into the medium is spectrophotometrically measured (405 nm for best dynamic range). The percent red blood cell disruption is then quantified relative to positive control samples lysed with a detergent. In this model system the erythrocyte membrane serves as a surrogate for the lipid bilayer membrane that enclose endo-lysosomal vesicles. The desired result is negligible hemolysis at physiologic pH (7.4) and robust hemolysis in the endo-lysosomal pH range from approximately pH 5-6.8.
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12 MeSH Terms