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Publication Record

Connections

Vagus Nerve Stimulation for the Treatment of Epilepsy.
González HFJ, Yengo-Kahn A, Englot DJ
(2019) Neurosurg Clin N Am 30: 219-230
MeSH Terms: Epilepsy, Humans, Seizures, Treatment Outcome, Vagus Nerve Stimulation
Show Abstract · Added June 22, 2019
Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) was the first neuromodulation device approved for treatment of epilepsy. In more than 20 years of study, VNS has consistently demonstrated efficacy in treating epilepsy. After 2 years, approximately 50% of patients experience at least 50% reduced seizure frequency. Adverse events with VNS treatment are rare and include surgical adverse events (including infection, vocal cord paresis, and so forth) and stimulation side effects (hoarseness, voice change, and cough). Future developments in VNS, including closed-loop and noninvasive stimulation, may reduce side effects or increase efficacy of VNS.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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MeSH Terms
Relating structural and functional brainstem connectivity to disease measures in epilepsy.
Englot DJ, Gonzalez HFJ, Reynolds BB, Konrad PE, Jacobs ML, Gore JC, Landman BA, Morgan VL
(2018) Neurology 91: e67-e77
MeSH Terms: Adult, Brain Stem, Case-Control Studies, Cognition Disorders, Epilepsy, Female, Humans, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Nerve Net, Neuropsychological Tests, Oxygen, Retrospective Studies
Show Abstract · Added September 25, 2018
OBJECTIVE - While epilepsy studies rarely examine brainstem, we sought to examine the hypothesis that temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) leads to subcortical arousal center dysfunction, contributing to neocortical connectivity and neurocognitive disturbances.
METHODS - In this case-control study of 26 adult patients with TLE and 26 controls, we used MRI to measure structural and functional connectivity of the cuneiform/subcuneiform nuclei (CSC), pedunculopontine nucleus, and ventral tegmental area. Ascending reticular activating system connectivity patterns were related to neuropsychological and disease measures.
RESULTS - Compared to controls, patients with TLE demonstrated reductions in ascending reticular activating system structural and functional connectivity, most prominently to neocortical regions ( < 0.05, unpaired tests, corrected). While reduced CSC structural connectivity was related to impaired performance IQ and visuospatial memory, diminished CSC functional connectivity was associated with impaired verbal IQ and language abilities ( < 0.05, Spearman ρ, tests). Finally, CSC structural connectivity decreases were quantitatively associated with consciousness-impairing seizure frequency ( < 0.05, Spearman ρ) and the presence of generalized seizures ( < 0.05, unpaired test), suggesting a relationship to disease severity.
CONCLUSIONS - Connectivity perturbations in brainstem arousal centers are present in TLE and may contribute to neurocognitive problems. These studies demonstrate the underappreciated role of brainstem networks in epilepsy and may lead to novel neuromodulation targets to treat or prevent deleterious brain network effects of seizures in TLE.
© 2018 American Academy of Neurology.
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3 Members
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15 MeSH Terms
Increased nationwide use of stereoencephalography for intracranial epilepsy electroencephalography recordings.
Abou-Al-Shaar H, Brock AA, Kundu B, Englot DJ, Rolston JD
(2018) J Clin Neurosci 53: 132-134
MeSH Terms: Adult, Electrocorticography, Electrodes, Implanted, Epilepsy, Female, Humans, Male
Show Abstract · Added September 25, 2018
Intracranial electroencephalography (iEEG) can be performed using minimally invasive stereo-electroencephalography (SEEG) or by implanting subdural electrodes via a craniotomy or multiple burr holes. There is anecdotal evidence that SEEG is becoming more common in the United States, though this has yet to be quantified. To address this question, all SEEG and burr hole/craniotomy subdural iEEG procedures were extracted from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Part B data files for the years 2000-2016. National trends were compared over time. In 2016, SEEG became the most frequently performed intracranial monitoring procedure in the Medicare population, increasing from 28.8% of total cases in 2000 to 43.1% in 2016 (p = 0.02). The proportion of strip electrode cases (through burr holes) significantly declined, while the frequency of craniotomies for subdural grid placement did not significantly change. These data are consistent with a nationwide increase in the utilization of SEEG with a concomitant decline in burr hole placement of subdural strip electrodes in the United States. The factors driving these changes are unknown, but are likely due in part to the desire for minimally invasive surgical options.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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A modern epilepsy surgery treatment algorithm: Incorporating traditional and emerging technologies.
Englot DJ
(2018) Epilepsy Behav 80: 68-74
MeSH Terms: Algorithms, Drug Resistant Epilepsy, Electroencephalography, Epilepsy, Epilepsy, Generalized, Humans, Imaging, Three-Dimensional, Minimally Invasive Surgical Procedures, Quality of Life, Radiosurgery, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added September 25, 2018
Epilepsy surgery has seen numerous technological advances in both diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in recent years. This has increased the number of patients who may be candidates for intervention and potential improvement in quality of life. However, the expansion of the field also necessitates a broader understanding of how to incorporate both traditional and emerging technologies into the care provided at comprehensive epilepsy centers. This review summarizes both old and new surgical procedures in epilepsy using an example algorithm. While treatment algorithms are inherently oversimplified, incomplete, and reflect personal bias, they provide a general framework that can be customized to each center and each patient, incorporating differences in provider opinion, patient preference, and the institutional availability of technologies. For instance, the use of minimally invasive stereotactic electroencephalography (SEEG) has increased dramatically over the past decade, but many cases still benefit from invasive recordings using subdural grids. Furthermore, although surgical resection remains the gold-standard treatment for focal mesial temporal or neocortical epilepsy, ablative procedures such as laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) may be appropriate and avoid craniotomy in many cases. Furthermore, while palliative surgical procedures were once limited to disconnection surgeries, several neurostimulation treatments are now available to treat eloquent cortical, bitemporal, and even multifocal or generalized epilepsy syndromes. An updated perspective in epilepsy surgery will help guide surgical decision making and lay the groundwork for data collection needed in future studies and trials.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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1 Members
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11 MeSH Terms
Two-Dimensional Temporal Clustering Analysis for Patients with Epilepsy: Detecting Epilepsy-Related Information in EEG-fMRI Concordant, Discordant and Spike-Less Patients.
Maziero D, Velasco TR, Salmon CEG, Morgan VL
(2018) Brain Topogr 31: 322-336
MeSH Terms: Adult, Cluster Analysis, Electroencephalography, Epilepsy, Female, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added March 16, 2018
EEG acquired simultaneously with fMRI (EEG-fMRI) is a multimodal method that has shown promise in mapping the seizure onset zone in patients with focal epilepsy. However, there are many instances when this method is unsuccessful or not applicable, and other data driven fMRI methods may be utilized. One such method is the two-dimensional temporal clustering analysis (2dTCA). In this study we compared the classic EEG-fMRI and 2dTCA performance in mapping regions related to the seizure onset region in 18 focal epilepsy patients (12 presenting interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs), during EEG-fMRI acquisition) with Engel I or II surgical outcome. Activation maps of both 2dTCA timing outputs (positive and negative histograms) and EEG detected IEDs were computed and compared to the region of epilepsy surgical resection. Patients were evaluated in three categories based on frequency of EEG detected spiking during the MRI. EEG-fMRI maps were concordant to the epilepsy region in 5/12 subjects, four with frequent IEDs on EEG. The 2dTCA was successful in mapping 13/18 patients including 3/6 with no IEDs detected (10/12 with IEDs detected). The epilepsy-related activities were successfully mapped by both methods in only 4/12 patients. This work suggests that the epilepsy-related information detected by each method may be different: while EEG-fMRI is more accurate in patients with high rather than lower numbers of EEG detected IEDs; 2dTCA can be useful in evaluating patients even when no concurrent EEG spikes are detected or EEG-fMRI is not effective. Therefore, our results support that 2dTCA might be an alternative for mapping epilepsy-related BOLD activity in negative EEG-fMRI (6/7 patients) and spike-less patients.
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1 Members
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10 MeSH Terms
Rates and predictors of success and failure in repeat epilepsy surgery: A meta-analysis and systematic review.
Krucoff MO, Chan AY, Harward SC, Rahimpour S, Rolston JD, Muh C, Englot DJ
(2017) Epilepsia 58: 2133-2142
MeSH Terms: Drug Resistant Epilepsy, Electroencephalography, Humans, Reoperation, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added September 25, 2018
OBJECTIVE - Medically refractory epilepsy is a debilitating disorder that is particularly challenging to treat in patients who have already failed a surgical resection. Evidence regarding outcomes of further epilepsy surgery is limited to small case series and reviews. Therefore, our group performed the first quantitative meta-analysis of the literature from the past 30 years to assess for rates and predictors of successful reoperations.
METHODS - A PubMed search was conducted for studies reporting outcomes of repeat epilepsy surgery. Studies were excluded if they reported fewer than five eligible patients or had average follow-ups < 1 year, and patients were excluded from analysis if they received a nonresective intervention. Outcomes were stratified by each variable of interest, and quantitative meta-analysis was performed to generate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs).
RESULTS - Seven hundred eighty-two patients who received repeat resective epilepsy surgery from 36 studies were included. Engel I outcome was observed in 47% (n = 369) of patients. Significant predictors of seizure freedom included congruent over noncongruent electrophysiology data (OR = 3.6, 95% CI = 1.6-8.2), lesional over nonlesional epilepsy (OR = 3.2, 95% CI = 1.9-5.3), and surgical limitations over disease-related factors associated with failure of the first surgery (OR = 2.6, 95% CI = 1.3-5.3). Among patients with at least one of these predictors, seizure freedom was achieved in 58%. Conversely, the use of invasive monitoring was associated with worse outcome (OR = 0.4, 95% CI = 0.2-0.9). Temporal lobe over extratemporal/multilobe resection (OR = 1.5, 95% CI = 0.8-3.0) and abnormal over normal preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (OR = 1.9, 95% CI = 0.6-5.4) showed nonsignificant trends toward seizure freedom.
SIGNIFICANCE - This analysis supports considering further resection in patients with intractable epilepsy who continue to have debilitating seizures after an initial surgery, especially in the context of factors predictive of a favorable outcome.
Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.
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1 Members
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MeSH Terms
Functional connectivity disturbances of the ascending reticular activating system in temporal lobe epilepsy.
Englot DJ, D'Haese PF, Konrad PE, Jacobs ML, Gore JC, Abou-Khalil BW, Morgan VL
(2017) J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 88: 925-932
MeSH Terms: Adult, Brain, Brain Mapping, Brain Stem, Case-Control Studies, Cerebral Cortex, Epilepsy, Temporal Lobe, Female, Humans, Limbic System, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Neocortex, Neural Inhibition, Neural Pathways, Neurocognitive Disorders, Synaptic Transmission
Show Abstract · Added June 23, 2017
OBJECTIVE - Seizures in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) disturb brain networks and lead to connectivity disturbances. We previously hypothesised that recurrent seizures in TLE may lead to abnormal connections involving subcortical activating structures including the ascending reticular activating system (ARAS), contributing to neocortical dysfunction and neurocognitive impairments. However, no studies of ARAS connectivity have been previously reported in patients with epilepsy.
METHODS - We used resting-state functional MRI recordings in 27 patients with TLE (67% right sided) and 27 matched controls to examine functional connectivity (partial correlation) between eight brainstem ARAS structures and 105 cortical/subcortical regions. ARAS nuclei included: cuneiform/subcuneiform, dorsal raphe, locus coeruleus, median raphe, parabrachial complex, pontine oralis, pedunculopontine and ventral tegmental area. Connectivity patterns were related to disease and neuropsychological parameters.
RESULTS - In control subjects, regions showing highest connectivity to ARAS structures included limbic structures, thalamus and certain neocortical areas, which is consistent with prior studies of ARAS projections. Overall, ARAS connectivity was significantly lower in patients with TLE than controls (p<0.05, paired t-test), particularly to neocortical regions including insular, lateral frontal, posterior temporal and opercular cortex. Diminished ARAS connectivity to these regions was related to increased frequency of consciousness-impairing seizures (p<0.01, Pearson's correlation) and was associated with impairments in verbal IQ, attention, executive function, language and visuospatial memory on neuropsychological evaluation (p<0.05, Spearman's rho or Kendell's tau-b).
CONCLUSIONS - Recurrent seizures in TLE are associated with disturbances in ARAS connectivity, which are part of the widespread network dysfunction that may be related to neurocognitive problems in this devastating disorder.
© Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.
0 Communities
3 Members
0 Resources
18 MeSH Terms
Magnetic resonance imaging connectivity for the prediction of seizure outcome in temporal lobe epilepsy.
Morgan VL, Englot DJ, Rogers BP, Landman BA, Cakir A, Abou-Khalil BW, Anderson AW
(2017) Epilepsia 58: 1251-1260
MeSH Terms: Adult, Biomarkers, Brain, Brain Mapping, Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Dominance, Cerebral, Electroencephalography, Epilepsy, Temporal Lobe, Female, Humans, Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Nerve Net, Predictive Value of Tests, Recurrence, Reference Values, Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added June 23, 2017
OBJECTIVE - Currently, approximately 60-70% of patients with unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) remain seizure-free 3 years after surgery. The goal of this work was to develop a presurgical connectivity-based biomarker to identify those patients who will have an unfavorable seizure outcome 1-year postsurgery.
METHODS - Resting-state functional and diffusion-weighted 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was acquired from 22 unilateral (15 right, 7 left) patients with TLE and 35 healthy controls. A seizure propagation network was identified including ipsilateral (to seizure focus) and contralateral hippocampus, thalamus, and insula, with bilateral midcingulate and precuneus. Between each pair of regions, functional connectivity based on correlations of low frequency functional MRI signals, and structural connectivity based on streamline density of diffusion MRI data were computed and transformed to metrics related to healthy controls of the same age.
RESULTS - A consistent connectivity pattern representing the network expected in patients with seizure-free outcome was identified using eight patients who were seizure-free at 1-year postsurgery. The hypothesis that increased similarity to the model would be associated with better seizure outcome was tested in 14 other patients (Engel class IA, seizure-free: n = 5; Engel class IB-II, favorable: n = 4; Engel class III-IV, unfavorable: n = 5) using two similarity metrics: Pearson correlation and Euclidean distance. The seizure-free connectivity model successfully separated all the patients with unfavorable outcome from the seizure-free and favorable outcome patients (p = 0.0005, two-tailed Fisher's exact test) through the combination of the two similarity metrics with 100% accuracy. No other clinical and demographic predictors were successful in this regard.
SIGNIFICANCE - This work introduces a methodologic framework to assess individual patients, and demonstrates the ability to use network connectivity as a potential clinical tool for epilepsy surgery outcome prediction after more comprehensive validation.
Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.
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2 Members
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20 MeSH Terms
A Bayesian Double Fusion Model for Resting-State Brain Connectivity Using Joint Functional and Structural Data.
Kang H, Ombao H, Fonnesbeck C, Ding Z, Morgan VL
(2017) Brain Connect 7: 219-227
MeSH Terms: Adult, Bayes Theorem, Brain, Diffusion Tensor Imaging, Epilepsy, Temporal Lobe, Female, Functional Neuroimaging, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Neural Pathways, Spatio-Temporal Analysis, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added April 6, 2017
Current approaches separately analyze concurrently acquired diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. The primary limitation of these approaches is that they do not take advantage of the information from DTI that could potentially enhance estimation of resting-state functional connectivity (FC) between brain regions. To overcome this limitation, we develop a Bayesian hierarchical spatiotemporal model that incorporates structural connectivity (SC) into estimating FC. In our proposed approach, SC based on DTI data is used to construct an informative prior for FC based on resting-state fMRI data through the Cholesky decomposition. Simulation studies showed that incorporating the two data produced significantly reduced mean squared errors compared to the standard approach of separately analyzing the two data from different modalities. We applied our model to analyze the resting state DTI and fMRI data collected to estimate FC between the brain regions that were hypothetically important in the origination and spread of temporal lobe epilepsy seizures. Our analysis concludes that the proposed model achieves smaller false positive rates and is much robust to data decimation compared to the conventional approach.
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2 Members
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14 MeSH Terms
Quality-of-life metrics with vagus nerve stimulation for epilepsy from provider survey data.
Englot DJ, Hassnain KH, Rolston JD, Harward SC, Sinha SR, Haglund MM
(2017) Epilepsy Behav 66: 4-9
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Child, Child, Preschool, Drug Resistant Epilepsy, Female, Humans, Infant, Male, Middle Aged, Outcome Assessment (Health Care), Quality of Life, Registries, Vagus Nerve Stimulation, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added June 23, 2017
OBJECTIVE - Drug-resistant epilepsy is a devastating disorder associated with diminished quality of life (QOL). Surgical resection leads to seizure freedom and improved QOL in many epilepsy patients, but not all individuals are candidates for resection. In these cases, neuromodulation-based therapies such as vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) are often used, but most VNS studies focus exclusively on reduction of seizure frequency. QOL changes and predictors with VNS remain poorly understood.
METHOD - Using the VNS Therapy Patient Outcome Registry, we examined 7 metrics related to QOL after VNS for epilepsy in over 5000 patients (including over 3000 with ≥12months follow-up), as subjectively assessed by treating physicians. Trends and predictors of QOL changes were examined and related to post-operative seizure outcome and likelihood of VNS generator replacement.
RESULTS - After VNS therapy, physicians reported patient improvement in alertness (58-63%, range over follow-up period), post-ictal state (55-62%), cluster seizures (48-56%), mood change (43-49%), verbal communication (38-45%), school/professional achievements (29-39%), and memory (29-38%). Predictors of net QOL improvement included shorter time to implant (odds ratio [OR], 1.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-1.6), generalized seizure type (OR, 1.2; 95% CI, 1.0-1.4), female gender (OR, 1.2; 95% CI, 1.0-1.4), and Caucasian ethnicity (OR, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.0-1.5). No significant trends were observed over time. Patients with net QOL improvement were more likely to have favorable seizure outcomes (chi square [χ]=148.1, p<0.001) and more likely to undergo VNS generator replacement (χ=68.9, p<0.001) than those with worsened/unchanged QOL.
SIGNIFICANCE - VNS for drug-resistant epilepsy is associated with improvement on various QOL metrics subjectively rated by physicians. QOL improvement is associated with favorable seizure outcome and a higher likelihood of generator replacement, suggesting satisfaction with therapy. It is important to consider QOL metrics in neuromodulation for epilepsy, given the deleterious effects of seizures on patient QOL.
Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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17 MeSH Terms