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A case report of clonal EBV-like memory CD4 T cell activation in fatal checkpoint inhibitor-induced encephalitis.
Johnson DB, McDonnell WJ, Gonzalez-Ericsson PI, Al-Rohil RN, Mobley BC, Salem JE, Wang DY, Sanchez V, Wang Y, Chastain CA, Barker K, Liang Y, Warren S, Beechem JM, Menzies AM, Tio M, Long GV, Cohen JV, Guidon AC, O'Hare M, Chandra S, Chowdhary A, Lebrun-Vignes B, Goldinger SM, Rushing EJ, Buchbinder EI, Mallal SA, Shi C, Xu Y, Moslehi JJ, Sanders ME, Sosman JA, Balko JM
(2019) Nat Med 25: 1243-1250
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes, Encephalitis, Female, Herpesvirus 4, Human, Humans, Immunologic Memory, Lymphocyte Activation, Male, Middle Aged, Programmed Cell Death 1 Receptor, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added November 12, 2019
Checkpoint inhibitors produce durable responses in numerous metastatic cancers, but immune-related adverse events (irAEs) complicate and limit their benefit. IrAEs can affect organ systems idiosyncratically; presentations range from mild and self-limited to fulminant and fatal. The molecular mechanisms underlying irAEs are poorly understood. Here, we report a fatal case of encephalitis arising during anti-programmed cell death receptor 1 therapy in a patient with metastatic melanoma. Histologic analyses revealed robust T cell infiltration and prominent programmed death ligand 1 expression. We identified 209 reported cases in global pharmacovigilance databases (across multiple cancer types) of encephalitis associated with checkpoint inhibitor regimens, with a 19% fatality rate. We performed further analyses from the index case and two additional cases to shed light on this recurrent and fulminant irAE. Spatial and multi-omic analyses pinpointed activated memory CD4 T cells as highly enriched in the inflamed, affected region. We identified a highly oligoclonal T cell receptor repertoire, which we localized to activated memory cytotoxic (CD45ROGZMBKi67) CD4 cells. We also identified Epstein-Barr virus-specific T cell receptors and EBV lymphocytes in the affected region, which we speculate contributed to neural inflammation in the index case. Collectively, the three cases studied here identify CD4 and CD8 T cells as culprits of checkpoint inhibitor-associated immune encephalitis.
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MeSH Terms
Protective antibodies against Eastern equine encephalitis virus bind to epitopes in domains A and B of the E2 glycoprotein.
Kim AS, Austin SK, Gardner CL, Zuiani A, Reed DS, Trobaugh DW, Sun C, Basore K, Williamson LE, Crowe JE, Slifka MK, Fremont DH, Klimstra WB, Diamond MS
(2019) Nat Microbiol 4: 187-197
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antibodies, Monoclonal, Antibodies, Neutralizing, Antibodies, Viral, Chlorocebus aethiops, Cricetinae, Encephalitis Virus, Eastern Equine, Encephalomyelitis, Equine, Epitope Mapping, Epitopes, Female, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Mice, Protein Domains, Vero Cells, Viral Envelope Proteins
Show Abstract · Added March 31, 2019
Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) is a mosquito-transmitted alphavirus with a high case mortality rate in humans. EEEV is a biodefence concern because of its potential for aerosol spread and the lack of existing countermeasures. Here, we identify a panel of 18 neutralizing murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against the EEEV E2 glycoprotein, several of which have 'elite' activity with 50 and 99% effective inhibitory concentrations (EC and EC) of less than 10 and 100 ng ml, respectively. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis and neutralization escape mapping analysis revealed epitopes for these mAbs in domains A or B of the E2 glycoprotein. A majority of the neutralizing mAbs blocked infection at a post-attachment stage, with several inhibiting viral membrane fusion. Administration of one dose of anti-EEEV mAb protected mice from lethal subcutaneous or aerosol challenge. These experiments define the mechanistic basis for neutralization by protective anti-EEEV mAbs and suggest a path forward for treatment and vaccine design.
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17 MeSH Terms
Clinical Reasoning: A 57-year-old woman with ataxia and oscillopsia: Varicella-zoster encephalitis.
Bradshaw MJ, Gilden D, Lavin P, Sriram S
(2016) Neurology 87: e61-4
MeSH Terms: Ataxia, Encephalitis, Varicella Zoster, Female, Humans, Immunocompromised Host, Kidney Transplantation, Middle Aged, Ocular Motility Disorders
Added April 18, 2017
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Immunogenicity and efficacy of alphavirus-derived replicon vaccines for respiratory syncytial virus and human metapneumovirus in nonhuman primates.
Bates JT, Pickens JA, Schuster JE, Johnson M, Tollefson SJ, Williams JV, Davis NL, Johnston RE, Schultz-Darken N, Slaughter JC, Smith-House F, Crowe JE
(2016) Vaccine 34: 950-6
MeSH Terms: Alphavirus, Animals, Antibodies, Neutralizing, Antibodies, Viral, Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid, Chlorocebus aethiops, Encephalitis Virus, Venezuelan Equine, Immunoglobulin G, Metapneumovirus, Neutralization Tests, Nose, Paramyxoviridae Infections, Replicon, Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections, Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human, Viral Fusion Proteins, Viral Vaccines
Show Abstract · Added January 26, 2016
Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) are major causes of illness among children, the elderly, and the immunocompromised. No vaccine has been licensed for protection against either of these viruses. We tested the ability of two Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus-based viral replicon particle (VEE-VRP) vaccines that express the hRSV or hMPV fusion (F) protein to confer protection against hRSV or hMPV in African green monkeys. Animals immunized with VEE-VRP vaccines developed RSV or MPV F-specific antibodies and serum neutralizing activity. Compared to control animals, immunized animals were better able to control viral load in the respiratory mucosa following challenge and had lower levels of viral genome in nasopharyngeal and bronchoalveolar lavage fluids. The high level of immunogenicity and protective efficacy induced by these vaccine candidates in nonhuman primates suggest that they hold promise for further development.
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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17 MeSH Terms
Neural stem cells sustain natural killer cells that dictate recovery from brain inflammation.
Liu Q, Sanai N, Jin WN, La Cava A, Van Kaer L, Shi FD
(2016) Nat Neurosci 19: 243-52
MeSH Terms: Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Animals, Brain, Brain Chemistry, Cell Proliferation, Cerebral Ventricles, Cytokines, Encephalitis, Encephalomyelitis, Autoimmune, Experimental, Female, Humans, Immune Tolerance, Interleukin-15, Killer Cells, Natural, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Transgenic, Multiple Sclerosis, Neural Stem Cells, Recovery of Function
Show Abstract · Added March 28, 2016
Recovery from organ-specific autoimmune diseases largely relies on the mobilization of endogenous repair mechanisms and local factors that control them. Natural killer (NK) cells are swiftly mobilized to organs targeted by autoimmunity and typically undergo numerical contraction when inflammation wanes. We report the unexpected finding that NK cells are retained in the brain subventricular zone (SVZ) during the chronic phase of multiple sclerosis in humans and its animal model in mice. These NK cells were found preferentially in close proximity to SVZ neural stem cells (NSCs) that produce interleukin-15 and sustain functionally competent NK cells. Moreover, NK cells limited the reparative capacity of NSCs following brain inflammation. These findings reveal that reciprocal interactions between NSCs and NK cells regulate neurorepair.
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22 MeSH Terms
A mouse model for Betacoronavirus subgroup 2c using a bat coronavirus strain HKU5 variant.
Agnihothram S, Yount BL, Donaldson EF, Huynh J, Menachery VD, Gralinski LE, Graham RL, Becker MM, Tomar S, Scobey TD, Osswald HL, Whitmore A, Gopal R, Ghosh AK, Mesecar A, Zambon M, Heise M, Denison MR, Baric RS
(2014) mBio 5: e00047-14
MeSH Terms: Animals, Chiroptera, Coronavirus, Coronavirus Infections, Disease Models, Animal, Drug Carriers, Encephalitis Virus, Venezuelan Equine, Eosinophilia, Genetic Vectors, Mice, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Respiratory System, Vaccines, Synthetic, Viral Vaccines
Show Abstract · Added February 19, 2015
Cross-species transmission of zoonotic coronaviruses (CoVs) can result in pandemic disease outbreaks. Middle East respiratory syndrome CoV (MERS-CoV), identified in 2012, has caused 182 cases to date, with ~43% mortality, and no small animal model has been reported. MERS-CoV and Pipistrellus bat coronavirus (BtCoV) strain HKU5 of Betacoronavirus (β-CoV) subgroup 2c share >65% identity at the amino acid level in several regions, including nonstructural protein 5 (nsp5) and the nucleocapsid (N) protein, which are significant drug and vaccine targets. BtCoV HKU5 has been described in silico but has not been shown to replicate in culture, thus hampering drug and vaccine studies against subgroup 2c β-CoVs. We report the synthetic reconstruction and testing of BtCoV HKU5 containing the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-CoV spike (S) glycoprotein ectodomain (BtCoV HKU5-SE). This virus replicates efficiently in cell culture and in young and aged mice, where the virus targets airway and alveolar epithelial cells. Unlike some subgroup 2b SARS-CoV vaccines that elicit a strong eosinophilia following challenge, we demonstrate that BtCoV HKU5 and MERS-CoV N-expressing Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particle (VRP) vaccines do not cause extensive eosinophilia following BtCoV HKU5-SE challenge. Passage of BtCoV HKU5-SE in young mice resulted in enhanced virulence, causing 20% weight loss, diffuse alveolar damage, and hyaline membrane formation in aged mice. Passaged virus was characterized by mutations in the nsp13, nsp14, open reading frame 5 (ORF5) and M genes. Finally, we identified an inhibitor active against the nsp5 proteases of subgroup 2c β-CoVs. Synthetic-genome platforms capable of reconstituting emerging zoonotic viral pathogens or their phylogenetic relatives provide new strategies for identifying broad-based therapeutics, evaluating vaccine outcomes, and studying viral pathogenesis. IMPORTANCE The 2012 outbreak of MERS-CoV raises the specter of another global epidemic, similar to the 2003 SARS-CoV epidemic. MERS-CoV is related to BtCoV HKU5 in target regions that are essential for drug and vaccine testing. Because no small animal model exists to evaluate MERS-CoV pathogenesis or to test vaccines, we constructed a recombinant BtCoV HKU5 that expressed a region of the SARS-CoV spike (S) glycoprotein, thereby allowing the recombinant virus to grow in cell culture and in mice. We show that this recombinant virus targets airway epithelial cells and causes disease in aged mice. We use this platform to (i) identify a broad-spectrum antiviral that can potentially inhibit viruses closely related to MERS-CoV, (ii) demonstrate the absence of increased eosinophilic immune pathology for MERS-CoV N protein-based vaccines, and (iii) mouse adapt this virus to identify viral genetic determinants of cross-species transmission and virulence. This study holds significance as a strategy to control newly emerging viruses.
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14 MeSH Terms
Diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of Hashimoto's encephalopathy.
Olmez I, Moses H, Sriram S, Kirshner H, Lagrange AH, Pawate S
(2013) J Neurol Sci 331: 67-71
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Autoantibodies, Azathioprine, Brain Diseases, Child, Child, Preschool, Electroencephalography, Encephalitis, Enzyme Inhibitors, Female, Hashimoto Disease, Humans, Immunoglobulins, Intravenous, Male, Methotrexate, Middle Aged, Retrospective Studies, Steroids
Show Abstract · Added August 14, 2014
OBJECTIVE - To share our experience on clinical presentation and management of patients diagnosed with Hashimoto's Encephalopathy (HE) at Vanderbilt Medical Center between 1999 and 2012.
BACKGROUND - HE is a rare disorder characterized by encephalopathy and central nervous system (CNS) dysfunction, elevated antithyroid antibodies, the absence of infection or structural abnormalities in the CNS, and a response to treatment with steroids. The relationship between thyroid antibodies and encephalopathy has remained unresolved.
DESIGN/METHODS - Retrospective chart review.
RESULTS - We identified 13 patients who met the criteria for the diagnosis of HE. The median age was 49 years (range, 2-66) and all except one were women. Encephalopathy in the form of altered mental status, stroke-like symptoms or seizures, with prompt resolution of symptoms upon receiving steroids, was the commonest presentation, seen in 7 patients. The second commonest presentation was subacute progressive decrease in cognitive function, which reversed within days to weeks after steroid therapy, seen in 4 patients. Electroencephalogram (EEG) was available in 12 patients and was abnormal in 8, showing nonspecific cerebral dysfunction in all 8 and epileptiform activity in 3. Treatment consisted of steroids in the acute phase for 12 of 13 patients with rapid improvement in symptoms. Maintenance therapy was rituximab in 7 patients, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) in 7, azathioprine in 4, mycophenolate mofetil in 3, and methotrexate in 1 (some patients received sequential therapy with different agents). There was complete or near complete resolution of symptoms in 12 of the 13 patients.
CONCLUSIONS - We present a cohort of patients in whom CNS dysfunction was associated with elevated antithyroid antibodies and reversal of disease followed immunomodulatory therapies.
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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Inflammatory prostaglandin E2 signaling in a mouse model of Alzheimer disease.
Shi J, Wang Q, Johansson JU, Liang X, Woodling NS, Priyam P, Loui TM, Merchant M, Breyer RM, Montine TJ, Andreasson K
(2012) Ann Neurol 72: 788-98
MeSH Terms: Age Factors, Alzheimer Disease, Amyloid Precursor Protein Secretases, Amyloid beta-Peptides, Amyloid beta-Protein Precursor, Analysis of Variance, Animals, Animals, Newborn, Aspartic Acid Endopeptidases, Brain, Calcium-Binding Proteins, Cells, Cultured, Cognitive Dysfunction, DNA-Binding Proteins, Dinoprostone, Disease Models, Animal, Encephalitis, Female, Gene Expression Regulation, Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein, Humans, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Transgenic, Microfilament Proteins, Microtubule-Associated Proteins, Mutation, Neurons, Oxidative Stress, Peptide Fragments, Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases, RNA, Messenger, Receptors, Prostaglandin E, EP3 Subtype, Signal Transduction, Synaptosomal-Associated Protein 25, Vesicle-Associated Membrane Protein 2
Show Abstract · Added December 21, 2013
OBJECTIVE - There is significant evidence for a central role of inflammation in the development of Alzheimer disease (AD). Epidemiological studies indicate that chronic use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) reduces the risk of developing AD in healthy aging populations. As NSAIDs inhibit the enzymatic activity of the inflammatory cyclooxygenases COX-1 and COX-2, these findings suggest that downstream prostaglandin signaling pathways function in the preclinical development of AD. Here, we investigate the function of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2) ) signaling through its EP3 receptor in the neuroinflammatory response to Aβ peptide.
METHODS - The function of PGE(2) signaling through its EP3 receptor was examined in vivo in a model of subacute neuroinflammation induced by administration of Aβ(42) peptides. Our findings were then confirmed in young adult APPSwe-PS1ΔE9 transgenic mice.
RESULTS - Deletion of the PGE(2) EP3 receptor in a model of Aβ(42) peptide-induced neuroinflammation reduced proinflammatory gene expression, cytokine production, and oxidative stress. In the APPSwe-PS1ΔE9 model of familial AD, deletion of the EP3 receptor blocked induction of proinflammatory gene and protein expression and lipid peroxidation. In addition, levels of Aβ peptides were significantly decreased, as were β-secretase and β C-terminal fragment levels, suggesting that generation of Aβ peptides may be increased as a result of proinflammatory EP3 signaling. Finally, deletion of EP3 receptor significantly reversed the decline in presynaptic proteins seen in APPSwe-PS1ΔE9 mice.
INTERPRETATION - Our findings identify the PGE(2) EP3 receptor as a novel proinflammatory, proamyloidogenic, and synaptotoxic signaling pathway, and suggest a role for COX-PGE(2) -EP3 signaling in the development of AD.
Copyright © 2012 American Neurological Association.
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37 MeSH Terms
Bid regulates the pathogenesis of neurotropic reovirus.
Danthi P, Pruijssers AJ, Berger AK, Holm GH, Zinkel SS, Dermody TS
(2010) PLoS Pathog 6: e1000980
MeSH Terms: Animals, Apoptosis, BH3 Interacting Domain Death Agonist Protein, Encephalitis, Viral, Fas-Associated Death Domain Protein, Fibroblasts, Humans, L Cells, Mice, NF-kappa B, Receptors, TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand, Reoviridae, Reoviridae Infections, Signal Transduction, Virus Replication
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Reovirus infection leads to apoptosis in both cultured cells and the murine central nervous system (CNS). NF-kappaB-driven transcription of proapoptotic cellular genes is required for the effector phase of the apoptotic response. Although both extrinsic death-receptor signaling pathways and intrinsic pathways involving mitochondrial injury are implicated in reovirus-induced apoptosis, mechanisms by which either of these pathways are activated and their relationship to NF-kappaB signaling following reovirus infection are unknown. The proapoptotic Bcl-2 family member, Bid, is activated by proteolytic cleavage following reovirus infection. To understand how reovirus integrates host signaling circuits to induce apoptosis, we examined proapoptotic signaling following infection of Bid-deficient cells. Although reovirus growth was not affected by the absence of Bid, cells lacking Bid failed to undergo apoptosis. Furthermore, we found that NF-kappaB activation is required for Bid cleavage and subsequent proapoptotic signaling. To examine the functional significance of Bid-dependent apoptosis in reovirus disease, we monitored fatal encephalitis caused by reovirus in the presence and absence of Bid. Survival of Bid-deficient mice was significantly enhanced in comparison to wild-type mice following either peroral or intracranial inoculation of reovirus. Decreased reovirus virulence in Bid-null mice was accompanied by a reduction in viral yield. These findings define a role for NF-kappaB-dependent cleavage of Bid in the cell death program initiated by viral infection and link Bid to viral virulence.
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15 MeSH Terms
An alphavirus replicon-based human metapneumovirus vaccine is immunogenic and protective in mice and cotton rats.
Mok H, Tollefson SJ, Podsiad AB, Shepherd BE, Polosukhin VV, Johnston RE, Williams JV, Crowe JE
(2008) J Virol 82: 11410-8
MeSH Terms: Administration, Intranasal, Animals, Antibodies, Viral, Cell Line, Encephalitis Virus, Venezuelan Equine, Immunoglobulin A, Immunoglobulin G, Lung, Macaca mulatta, Metapneumovirus, Mice, Mice, Inbred DBA, Mucous Membrane, Neutralization Tests, Paramyxoviridae Infections, Rats, Respiratory System, Sigmodontinae, Viral Structural Proteins, Viral Vaccines
Show Abstract · Added August 6, 2012
Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is a recently discovered paramyxovirus that causes upper and lower respiratory tract infections in infants, the elderly, and immunocompromised individuals worldwide. Here, we developed Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRPs) encoding hMPV fusion (F) or attachment (G) glycoproteins and evaluated the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of these vaccine candidates in mice and cotton rats. VRPs encoding hMPV F protein, when administered intranasally, induced F-specific virus-neutralizing antibodies in serum and immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies in secretions at the respiratory mucosa. Challenge virus replication was reduced significantly in both the upper and lower respiratory tracts following intranasal hMPV challenge in these animals. However, vaccination with hMPV G protein VRPs did not induce neutralizing antibodies or protect animals from hMPV challenge. Close examination of the histopathology of the lungs of VRP-MPV F-vaccinated animals following hMPV challenge revealed no enhancement of inflammation or mucus production. Aberrant cytokine gene expression was not detected in these animals. Together, these results represent an important first step toward the use of VRPs encoding hMPV F proteins as a prophylactic vaccine for hMPV.
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20 MeSH Terms