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Cerebral blood flow in 5- to 8-month-olds: Regional tissue maturity is associated with infant affect.
Catalina Camacho M, King LS, Ojha A, Garcia CM, Sisk LM, Cichocki AC, Humphreys KL, Gotlib IH
(2020) Dev Sci 23: e12928
MeSH Terms: Brain, Cerebrovascular Circulation, Emotions, Female, Humans, Infant, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Mothers, Prefrontal Cortex, Stress, Psychological, Temperament
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
Infancy is marked by rapid neural and emotional development. The relation between brain function and emotion in infancy, however, is not well understood. Methods for measuring brain function predominantly rely on the BOLD signal; however, interpretation of the BOLD signal in infancy is challenging because the neuronal-hemodynamic relation is immature. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) provides a context for the infant BOLD signal and can yield insight into the developmental maturity of brain regions that may support affective behaviors. This study aims to elucidate the relations among rCBF, age, and emotion in infancy. One hundred and seven mothers reported their infants' (infant age M ± SD = 6.14 ± 0.51 months) temperament. A subsample of infants completed MRI scans, 38 of whom produced usable perfusion MRI during natural sleep to quantify rCBF. Mother-infant dyads completed the repeated Still-Face Paradigm, from which infant affect reactivity and recovery to stress were quantified. We tested associations of infant age at scan, temperament factor scores, and observed affect reactivity and recovery with voxel-wise rCBF. Infant age was positively associated with CBF in nearly all voxels, with peaks located in sensory cortices and the ventral prefrontal cortex, supporting the formulation that rCBF is an indicator of tissue maturity. Temperamental Negative Affect and recovery of positive affect following a stressor were positively associated with rCBF in several cortical and subcortical limbic regions, including the orbitofrontal cortex and inferior frontal gyrus. This finding yields insight into the nature of affective neurodevelopment during infancy. Specifically, infants with relatively increased prefrontal cortex maturity may evidence a disposition toward greater negative affect and negative reactivity in their daily lives yet show better recovery of positive affect following a social stressor.
© 2019 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
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12 MeSH Terms
Early life stress, cortisol, frontolimbic connectivity, and depressive symptoms during puberty.
Kircanski K, Sisk LM, Ho TC, Humphreys KL, King LS, Colich NL, Ordaz SJ, Gotlib IH
(2019) Dev Psychopathol 31: 1011-1022
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Depression, Emotions, Female, Frontal Lobe, Humans, Hydrocortisone, Hypothalamo-Hypophyseal System, Limbic System, Male, Nerve Net, Pituitary-Adrenal System, Puberty, Saliva, Stress, Psychological, White Matter
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
Early life stress (ELS) is a risk factor for the development of depression in adolescence; the mediating neurobiological mechanisms, however, are unknown. In this study, we examined in early pubertal youth the associations among ELS, cortisol stress responsivity, and white matter microstructure of the uncinate fasciculus and the fornix, two key frontolimbic tracts; we also tested whether and how these variables predicted depressive symptoms in later puberty. A total of 208 participants (117 females; M age = 11.37 years; M Tanner stage = 2.03) provided data across two or more assessment modalities: ELS; salivary cortisol levels during a psychosocial stress task; diffusion magnetic resonance imaging; and depressive symptoms. In early puberty there were significant associations between higher ELS and decreased cortisol production, and between decreased cortisol production and increased fractional anisotropy in the uncinate fasciculus. Further, increased fractional anisotropy in the uncinate fasciculus predicted higher depressive symptoms in later puberty, above and beyond earlier symptoms. In post hoc analyses, we found that sex moderated several additional associations. We discuss these findings within a broader conceptual model linking ELS, emotion dysregulation, and depression across the transition through puberty, and contend that brain circuits implicated in the control of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis function should be a focus of continued research.
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Neural correlates of resolving conflict from emotional and nonemotional distracters in obsessive-compulsive disorder.
Theiss JD, McHugo M, Zhao M, Zald DH, Olatunji BO
(2019) Psychiatry Res Neuroimaging 284: 29-36
MeSH Terms: Adult, Brain, Case-Control Studies, Emotions, Female, Frontal Lobe, Gyrus Cinguli, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Negotiating, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, Prefrontal Cortex
Show Abstract · Added April 15, 2019
Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) is associated with altered processing in brain regions involved in conflict resolution. However, limited research has examined the extent to which conflict from emotional distracters characterizes OCD such that responsiveness to task-irrelevant emotional stimuli is altered compared to controls. In the present study, 16 patients with OCD and 15 healthy controls underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during resolution of conflict from emotional or nonemotional distracters. Results in healthy controls demonstrated that rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC), middle frontal gyrus (MFG), and medial superior frontal gyrus (MSFG) showed greater activation for high conflict versus low conflict. Responses in these regions differed between the emotional and nonemotional distracter tasks, with rACC and MSFG having greater activation for conflict from nonemotional distracters and anterior MFG showing greater activation for conflict from emotional distracters. Furthermore, between-group differences revealed a region in right posterior MFG in which controls similarly exhibited greater activation during high conflict versus low conflict with emotional distracters; however, OCD patients showed the opposite pattern with greater activation during low conflict compared to high conflict. These findings suggest that activity of right posterior MFG may be relevant in better understanding inefficient responding during emotional conflict in OCD.
Copyright © 2019 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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13 MeSH Terms
The Online Support Group as a Community: A Thematic Content Analysis of an Online Support Group for Idiopathic Subglottic Stenosis.
Haik D, Kashanchi K, Tajran S, Heilbronn C, Anderson C, Francis DO, Gelbard A, Verma SP
(2019) Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol 128: 293-299
MeSH Terms: Access to Information, Disease Management, Emotions, Female, Global Health, Humans, Information Dissemination, Internet, Laryngostenosis, Male, Psychosocial Support Systems, Self-Help Groups
Show Abstract · Added July 30, 2020
OBJECTIVE: - Idiopathic subglottic stenosis (iSGS) is a rare disease with few local resources for individuals to use. With the explosive growth of online social networking, platforms such as Facebook possess compelling potential to facilitate user-driven sharing of health information and peer support. This study was performed to better understand the content shared in a busy online community for individuals with iSGS.
METHODS: - The largest online community (OC) for individuals with iSGS, Living With Idiopathic Subglottic Stenosis (LwiSGS), was examined. A thematic content analysis of the communications shared in February of 2018 was performed. A conventional qualitative analysis model was employed to analyze aggregated data. The data were then codified.
RESULTS: - Analysis demonstrated that communications primarily encompassed three major thematic elements: (1) information sharing; (2) emotional support, expression, and experience sharing; and (3) community building. Positively toned posts grossly overshadowed negatively toned posts by almost a factor of 3. A significant portion of group members requested information from their peers, suggesting a high level of trust toward the resources provided in this group, even those involving a surgical procedure or medication.
CONCLUSION: - LwiSGS is a forum for patients with a rare chronic condition to share informational resources, personal experiences, and emotional support, as well as a community with their peers. These data suggest that LwiSGS could be a powerful resource for individuals with iSGS to share information, personal experiences, or emotional support.
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MeSH Terms
The emotional attentional blink is robust to divided attention.
Keefe JM, Sy JL, Tong F, Zald DH
(2019) Atten Percept Psychophys 81: 205-216
MeSH Terms: Adult, Attention, Attentional Blink, Awareness, Emotions, Female, Humans, Male, Orientation, Spatial, Photic Stimulation, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added April 15, 2019
The emotional attentional blink (EAB) refers to a temporary impairment in the ability to identify a target when it is preceded by an emotional distractor. It is thought to occur because the emotional salience of the distractor exogenously captures attention for a brief duration, rendering the target unattended and preventing it from reaching awareness. Here we tested the extent to which the EAB can be attenuated by inducing a diffuse top-down attentional state, which has been shown to improve target identification in an analogous attentional phenomenon, the attentional blink. Rapid sequences of landscape images were presented centrally, and participants reported the orientation of a ± 90° rotation of a landscape target. To induce a diffuse state of attention, participants were given a secondary task of monitoring for the appearance of a colored dot in the periphery. We found that emotional distractors impaired target recognition performance to comparable extents, regardless of whether or not participants concurrently performed the peripheral-monitoring task. Moreover, we found that performance of the secondary task led to an impaired ability to ignore neutral distractors. Subjective ratings of target vividness mirrored the behavioral accuracy, with frequent reports of intermediate levels of vividness suggesting that the EAB might impair target visibility in a graded manner. Our results demonstrate that the EAB is robust to manipulations of top-down attention, suggesting that the temporary capture of attention by emotionally salient stimuli involves processes that are distinct from those that produce the attentional blink.
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Ventral prefrontal cortex and emotion regulation in aging: A case for utilizing transcranial magnetic stimulation.
Kim JU, Weisenbach SL, Zald DH
(2019) Int J Geriatr Psychiatry 34: 215-222
MeSH Terms: Aging, Cognition, Emotional Adjustment, Emotions, Humans, Prefrontal Cortex, Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation
Show Abstract · Added April 15, 2019
OBJECTIVES - The ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (vlPFC) has been speculated to play an important role in complex processes that allow emotional factors to influence human cognition. Accumulating evidence from human neuroimaging studies, in conjunction with studies of patients with lesions and animal models, shed light on the role of the vlPFC in emotion regulation (ER). This review aims to discuss and integrate recent findings related to vlPFC's role in ER in the context of aging, drawing from diverse sources, and suggest future directions for research utilizing transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS).
METHODS/DESIGN - We summarize findings from the existing literature investigating the neural basis of frontal-lobe mediated ER and then highlight major findings from recent studies directly comparing healthy younger and older adult groups. We conclude by pointing to unaddressed questions worth pursuing in future research.
RESULTS AND DISCUSSION - We propose future research directions utilizing TMS to answer key unaddressed questions. Moreover, we discuss the potential advantages, challenges, and limitations of using TMS as a complement to the existing neuroimaging methods in ER.
© 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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7 MeSH Terms
Black Americans' Perspectives of Barriers and Facilitators of Community Screening for Kidney Disease.
Umeukeje EM, Wild MG, Maripuri S, Davidson T, Rutherford M, Abdel-Kader K, Lewis J, Wilkins CH, Cavanaugh K
(2018) Clin J Am Soc Nephrol 13: 551-559
MeSH Terms: Adult, Advertising, African Americans, Aged, Community Health Services, Cultural Competency, Emotions, Female, Focus Groups, Health Education, Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice, Health Services Accessibility, Humans, Kidney Diseases, Male, Middle Aged, Motivation, Religion, Trust, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added November 29, 2018
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES - Incidence of ESKD is three times higher in black Americans than in whites, and CKD prevalence continues to rise among black Americans. Community-based kidney disease screening may increase early identification and awareness of black Americans at risk, but it is challenging to implement. This study aimed to identify participants' perspectives of community kidney disease screening. The Health Belief Model provides a theoretic framework for conceptualization of these perspectives and optimization of community kidney disease screening activities.
DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, & MEASUREMENTS - Researchers in collaboration with the Tennessee Kidney Foundation conducted three focus groups of adults in black American churches in Nashville, Tennessee. Questions examined views on CKD information, access to care, and priorities of kidney disease health. Content analysis was used. Guided by the Health Belief Model, themes were generated, and additional themes were derived from the data using an inductive approach.
RESULTS - Thirty-two black Americans completed the study in 2014. Participants were mostly women (79%) with a mean age of 56 years old (range, 24-78). Two major categories of barriers to kidney disease screening were identified: () participant factors, including limited kidney disease knowledge, spiritual/religious beliefs, emotions, and culture of the individual; and () logistic factors, including lack of convenience and incentives and poor advertisement. Potential facilitators of CKD screening included provision of CKD education, convenience of screening activities, and use of culturally sensitive and enhanced communication strategies. Program recommendations included partnering with trusted community members, selecting convenient locations, tailored advertising, and provision of compensation.
CONCLUSIONS - Findings of this study suggest that provider-delivered culturally sensitive education and stakeholder engagement are critical to increase trust, decrease fear, and maximize participation and early identification of kidney disease among black Americans considering community screening.
Copyright © 2018 by the American Society of Nephrology.
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20 MeSH Terms
Coping, emotion regulation, and psychopathology in childhood and adolescence: A meta-analysis and narrative review.
Compas BE, Jaser SS, Bettis AH, Watson KH, Gruhn MA, Dunbar JP, Williams E, Thigpen JC
(2017) Psychol Bull 143: 939-991
MeSH Terms: Adaptation, Psychological, Adolescent, Child, Emotions, Humans, Mental Disorders, Self-Control
Show Abstract · Added May 18, 2018
In this meta-analytic and narrative review, we examine several overarching issues related to the study of coping, emotion regulation, and internalizing and externalizing symptoms of psychopathology in childhood and adolescence, including the conceptualization and measurement of these constructs. We report a quantitative meta-analysis of 212 studies (N = 80,850 participants) that measured the associations between coping and emotion regulation with symptoms of internalizing and externalizing psychopathology. Within the meta-analysis we address the association of broad domains of coping and emotion regulation (e.g., total coping, emotion regulation), intermediate factors of coping and emotion regulation (e.g., primary control coping, secondary control coping), and specific coping and emotion regulation strategies (e.g., emotional expression, cognitive reappraisal) with internalizing and externalizing symptoms. For cross-sectional studies, which made up the majority of studies included, we examine 3 potential moderators: age, measure quality, and single versus multiple informants. Finally, we separately consider findings from longitudinal studies as these provide stronger tests of the effects. After accounting for publication bias, findings indicate that the broad domain of emotion regulation and adaptive coping and the factors of primary control coping and secondary control coping are related to lower levels of symptoms of psychopathology. Further, the domain of maladaptive coping, the factor of disengagement coping, and the strategies of emotional suppression, avoidance, and denial are related to higher levels of symptoms of psychopathology. Finally, we offer a critique of the current state of the field and outline an agenda for future research. (PsycINFO Database Record
(c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).
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Positive valence bias and parent-child relationship security moderate the association between early institutional caregiving and internalizing symptoms.
Vantieghem MR, Gabard-Durnam L, Goff B, Flannery J, Humphreys KL, Telzer EH, Caldera C, Louie JY, Shapiro M, Bolger N, Tottenham N
(2017) Dev Psychopathol 29: 519-533
MeSH Terms: Adaptation, Psychological, Adolescent, Adoption, Affective Symptoms, Child, Child, Institutionalized, Emotions, Facial Expression, Facial Recognition, Female, Humans, Male, Parent-Child Relations, Protective Factors
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
Institutional caregiving is associated with significant deviations from species-expected caregiving, altering the normative sequence of attachment formation and placing children at risk for long-term emotional difficulties. However, little is known about factors that can promote resilience following early institutional caregiving. In the current study, we investigated how adaptations in affective processing (i.e., positive valence bias) and family-level protective factors (i.e., secure parent-child relationships) moderate risk for internalizing symptoms in previously institutionalized (PI) youth. Children and adolescents with and without a history of institutional care performed a laboratory-based affective processing task and self-reported measures of parent-child relationship security. PI youth were more likely than comparison youth to show positive valence biases when interpreting ambiguous facial expressions. Both positive valence bias and parent-child relationship security moderated the association between institutional care and parent-reported internalizing symptoms, such that greater positive valence bias and more secure parent-child relationships predicted fewer symptoms in PI youth. However, when both factors were tested concurrently, parent-child relationship security more strongly moderated the link between PI status and internalizing symptoms. These findings suggest that both individual-level adaptations in affective processing and family-level factors of secure parent-child relationships may ameliorate risk for internalizing psychopathology following early institutional caregiving.
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Reaching back: the relative strength of the retroactive emotional attentional blink.
Ní Choisdealbha Á, Piech RM, Fuller JK, Zald DH
(2017) Sci Rep 7: 43645
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Analysis of Variance, Attention, Attentional Blink, Emotions, Humans, Male, Photic Stimulation, Reaction Time, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added April 6, 2017
Visual stimuli with emotional content appearing in close temporal proximity either before or after a target stimulus can hinder conscious perceptual processing of the target via an emotional attentional blink (EAB). This occurs for targets that appear after the emotional stimulus (forward EAB) and for those appearing before the emotional stimulus (retroactive EAB). Additionally, the traditional attentional blink (AB) occurs because detection of any target hinders detection of a subsequent target. The present study investigated the relations between these different attentional processes. Rapid sequences of landscape images were presented to thirty-one male participants with occasional landscape targets (rotated images). For the forward EAB, emotional or neutral distractor images of people were presented before the target; for the retroactive EAB, such images were also targets and presented after the landscape target. In the latter case, this design allowed investigation of the AB as well. Erotic and gory images caused more EABs than neutral images, but there were no differential effects on the AB. This pattern is striking because while using different target categories (rotated landscapes, people) appears to have eliminated the AB, the retroactive EAB still occurred, offering additional evidence for the power of emotional stimuli over conscious attention.
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11 MeSH Terms