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Discovery of Potent Myeloid Cell Leukemia-1 (Mcl-1) Inhibitors That Demonstrate in Vivo Activity in Mouse Xenograft Models of Human Cancer.
Lee T, Christov PP, Shaw S, Tarr JC, Zhao B, Veerasamy N, Jeon KO, Mills JJ, Bian Z, Sensintaffar JL, Arnold AL, Fogarty SA, Perry E, Ramsey HE, Cook RS, Hollingshead M, Davis Millin M, Lee KM, Koss B, Budhraja A, Opferman JT, Kim K, Arteaga CL, Moore WJ, Olejniczak ET, Savona MR, Fesik SW
(2019) J Med Chem 62: 3971-3988
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antineoplastic Agents, Azepines, Binding Sites, Cell Line, Tumor, Cell Survival, Crystallography, X-Ray, Drug Evaluation, Preclinical, Female, Humans, Mice, Mice, Inbred NOD, Mice, SCID, Molecular Dynamics Simulation, Myeloid Cell Leukemia Sequence 1 Protein, Neoplasms, Protein Structure, Tertiary, Small Molecule Libraries, Structure-Activity Relationship, Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
Show Abstract · Added April 15, 2019
Overexpression of myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1) in cancers correlates with high tumor grade and poor survival. Additionally, Mcl-1 drives intrinsic and acquired resistance to many cancer therapeutics, including B cell lymphoma 2 family inhibitors, proteasome inhibitors, and antitubulins. Therefore, Mcl-1 inhibition could serve as a strategy to target cancers that require Mcl-1 to evade apoptosis. Herein, we describe the use of structure-based design to discover a novel compound (42) that robustly and specifically inhibits Mcl-1 in cell culture and animal xenograft models. Compound 42 binds to Mcl-1 with picomolar affinity and inhibited growth of Mcl-1-dependent tumor cell lines in the nanomolar range. Compound 42 also inhibited the growth of hematological and triple negative breast cancer xenografts at well-tolerated doses. These findings highlight the use of structure-based design to identify small molecule Mcl-1 inhibitors and support the use of 42 as a potential treatment strategy to block Mcl-1 activity and induce apoptosis in Mcl-1-dependent cancers.
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20 MeSH Terms
A Coordinated Attack: Rett Syndrome Therapeutic Development.
Gogliotti RG, Niswender CM
(2019) Trends Pharmacol Sci 40: 233-236
MeSH Terms: Animals, Drug Discovery, Drug Evaluation, Preclinical, Drug Repositioning, Female, Humans, Methyl-CpG-Binding Protein 2, Mutation, Research Design, Rett Syndrome
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by mutations in the Methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) gene. This Science & Society article focuses on pharmacological strategies that attack RTT treatment from multiple angles, including drug repurposing and de novo discovery efforts, and discusses the impacts of preclinical study design and translationally relevant outcome measures.
Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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Discovery of Novel Central Nervous System Penetrant Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Subtype 2 (mGlu) Negative Allosteric Modulators (NAMs) Based on Functionalized Pyrazolo[1,5- a]pyrimidine-5-carboxamide and Thieno[3,2- b]pyridine-5-carboxamide Cores.
Childress ES, Wieting JM, Felts AS, Breiner MM, Long MF, Luscombe VB, Rodriguez AL, Cho HP, Blobaum AL, Niswender CM, Emmitte KA, Conn PJ, Lindsley CW
(2019) J Med Chem 62: 378-384
MeSH Terms: Allosteric Regulation, Amides, Animals, Central Nervous System, Drug Evaluation, Preclinical, Half-Life, Humans, Inhibitory Concentration 50, Protein Isoforms, Pyrazoles, Pyridines, Pyrimidines, Rats, Receptors, Metabotropic Glutamate, Structure-Activity Relationship
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
A scaffold hopping exercise from a monocyclic mGlu NAM with poor rodent PK led to two novel heterobicyclic series of mGlu NAMs based on either a functionalized pyrazolo[1,5- a]pyrimidine-5-carboxamide core or a thieno[3,2- b]pyridine-5-carboxamide core. These novel analogues possess enhanced rodent PK, while also maintaining good mGlu NAM potency, selectivity (versus mGlu and the remaining six mGlu receptors), and high CNS penetration. Interestingly, SAR was divergent between the new 5,6-heterobicyclic systems.
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Chemical Screening Using Cell-Free Egg Extract.
Broadus MR, Lee E
(2018) Cold Spring Harb Protoc 2018:
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell-Free System, Drug Evaluation, Preclinical, Ovum, Xenopus laevis
Show Abstract · Added April 8, 2018
Most drug screening methods use purified proteins, cultured cells, and/or small model organisms such as , zebrafish, flies, or nematodes. These systems have proven successes in drug discovery, but they also have weaknesses. Although purified cellular components allow for identification of compounds with activity against specific targets, such systems lack the complex biological interactions present in cellular and organismal screens. In vivo systems overcome these weaknesses, but the lack of cellular permeability, efflux by cellular pumps, and/or toxicity can be major limitations. egg extract, a concentrated and biologically active cytosol, can potentially overcome these weaknesses. Drug interactions occur in a near-physiological milieu, thereby functioning in a "truer" endogenous manner than purified components. Also, egg extract is a cell-free system that lacks intact plasma membranes that could restrict drug access to potential targets. Finally, egg extract is readily manipulated at the protein level: Proteins are easily depleted or added to the system, an important feature for analyzing drug effects in disease states. Thus, egg extract offers an attractive media for screening drugs that merges strengths of both in vitro and in vivo systems.
© 2018 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.
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5 MeSH Terms
Cancer therapy-induced cardiomyopathy: can human induced pluripotent stem cell modelling help prevent it?
Stack JP, Moslehi J, Sayed N, Wu JC
(2019) Eur Heart J 40: 1764-1770
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antineoplastic Agents, Cardiomyopathies, Cardiotoxicity, Cardiotoxins, Drug Evaluation, Preclinical, Genomics, Humans, Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells, Mice, Models, Biological, Neoplasms, Precision Medicine
Show Abstract · Added April 22, 2018
Cardiotoxic effects from cancer therapy are a major cause of morbidity during cancer treatment. Unexpected toxicity can occur during treatment and/or after completion of therapy, into the time of cancer survivorship. While older drugs such as anthracyclines have well-known cardiotoxic effects, newer drugs such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors, proteasome inhibitors, and immunotherapies also can cause diverse cardiovascular and metabolic complications. Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs) are increasingly being used as instruments for disease modelling, drug discovery, and mechanistic toxicity studies. Promising results with hiPSC-CM chemotherapy studies are raising hopes for improving cancer therapies through personalized medicine and safer drug development. Here, we review the cardiotoxicity profiles of common chemotherapeutic agents as well as efforts to model them in vitro using hiPSC-CMs.
Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author(s) 2018. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.
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13 MeSH Terms
GBT1118, a compound that increases the oxygen affinity of hemoglobin, improves survival in murine hypoxic acute lung injury.
Putz ND, Shaver CM, Dufu K, Li CM, Xu Q, Hutchaleelaha A, Lehrer-Graiwer J, Majka SM, Ware LB, Bastarache JA
(2018) J Appl Physiol (1985) 124: 899-905
MeSH Terms: Acute Lung Injury, Animals, Benzaldehydes, Disease Models, Animal, Drug Evaluation, Preclinical, Hypoxia, Lipopolysaccharides, Male, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Niacinamide
Show Abstract · Added May 31, 2018
Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by lung inflammation and pulmonary edema, leading to arterial hypoxemia and death if the hypoxemia is severe. Strategies to correct hypoxemia have the potential to improve clinical outcomes in ARDS. The goal of this study was to evaluate the potential of hemoglobin modification as a novel therapy for ARDS-induced hypoxemia. The therapeutic effect of two different doses of GBT1118, a compound that increases the oxygen affinity of hemoglobin, was evaluated in a murine model of acute lung injury induced by intratracheal LPS instillation 24 h before exposure to 5% or 10% hypoxia ( n = 8-15 per group). As expected, administration of GBT1118 to mice significantly increased the oxygen affinity of hemoglobin. Compared with mice receiving vehicle control, mice treated with GBT1118 had significantly lower mortality after LPS + 5% hypoxia (47% with vehicle vs. 22% with low-dose GBT1118, 13% with high-dose GBT1118, P = 0.032 by log rank) and had reduced severity of illness. Mice treated with GBT1118 showed a sustained significant increase in SpO over 4 h of hypoxia exposure. Treatment with GBT1118 did not alter alveolar-capillary permeability, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) inflammatory cell counts, or BAL concentrations of IL-1β, TNF-α, or macrophage inflammatory protein-1α. High-dose GBT1118 did not affect histological lung injury but did decrease tissue hypoxia as measured intensity of pimonidazole (Hypoxyprobe) staining in liver ( P = 0.043) and kidney ( P = 0.043). We concluded that increasing the oxygen affinity of hemoglobin using GBT1118 may be a novel therapy for treating hypoxemia associated with acute lung injury. NEW & NOTEWORTHY In this study, we show that GBT1118, a compound that increases hemoglobin affinity for oxygen, improves survival and oxygen saturation in a two-hit lung injury model of intratracheal LPS without causing tissue hypoxia. Modulation of hemoglobin oxygen affinity represents a novel therapeutic approach to treatment of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, conditions characterized by hypoxemia.
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10 MeSH Terms
When Enough Is Enough: Decision Criteria for Moving a Known Drug into Clinical Testing for a New Indication in the Absence of Preclinical Efficacy Data.
Pulley JM, Jerome RN, Zaleski NM, Shirey-Rice JK, Pruijssers AJ, Lavieri RR, Chettiar SN, Naylor HM, Aronoff DM, Edwards DA, Niswender CM, Dugan LL, Crofford LJ, Bernard GR, Holroyd KJ
(2017) Assay Drug Dev Technol 15: 354-361
MeSH Terms: Animals, Clinical Trials as Topic, Decision Making, Drug Evaluation, Preclinical, Drug Repositioning, Humans, Models, Animal
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
Many animal models of disease are suboptimal in their representation of human diseases and lack of predictive power in the success of pivotal human trials. In the context of repurposing drugs with known human safety, it is sometimes appropriate to conduct the "last experiment first," that is, progressing directly to human investigations. However, there are not accepted criteria for when to proceed straight to humans to test a new indication. We propose a specific set of criteria to guide the decision-making around when to initiate human proof of principle without preclinical efficacy studies in animal models. This approach could accelerate the transition of novel therapeutic approaches to human applications.
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Challenges in the development of an M PAM preclinical candidate: The discovery, SAR, and biological characterization of a series of azetidine-derived tertiary amides.
Tarr JC, Wood MR, Noetzel MJ, Melancon BJ, Lamsal A, Luscombe VB, Rodriguez AL, Byers FW, Chang S, Cho HP, Engers DW, Jones CK, Niswender CM, Wood MW, Brandon NJ, Duggan ME, Conn PJ, Bridges TM, Lindsley CW
(2017) Bioorg Med Chem Lett 27: 5179-5184
MeSH Terms: Allosteric Regulation, Amides, Azetidines, Drug Evaluation, Preclinical, Humans, Protein Binding, Pyridazines, Receptor, Muscarinic M4, Structure-Activity Relationship
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
Herein we describe the continued optimization of M positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) within the 5-amino-thieno[2,3-c]pyridazine series of compounds. In this letter, we disclose our studies on tertiary amides derived from substituted azetidines. This series provided excellent CNS penetration, which had been challenging to consistently achieve in other amide series. Efforts to mitigate high clearance, aided by metabolic softspot analysis, were unsuccessful and precluded this series from further consideration as a preclinical candidate. In the course of this study, we found that potassium tetrafluoroborate salts could be engaged in a tosyl hydrazone reductive cross coupling reaction, a previously unreported transformation, which expands the synthetic utility of the methodology.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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Discovery of a novel 2,4-dimethylquinoline-6-carboxamide M positive allosteric modulator (PAM) chemotype via scaffold hopping.
Long MF, Engers JL, Chang S, Zhan X, Weiner RL, Luscombe VB, Rodriguez AL, Cho HP, Niswender CM, Bridges TM, Conn PJ, Engers DW, Lindsley CW
(2017) Bioorg Med Chem Lett 27: 4999-5001
MeSH Terms: Allosteric Regulation, Amides, Animals, Brain, Drug Evaluation, Preclinical, Half-Life, Protein Binding, Pyridines, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Receptor, Muscarinic M4, Structure-Activity Relationship
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
This Letter details our efforts to replace the 3-amino moiety, an essential pharmacophore for M PAM activity in most M PAMs to date, within the thieno[2,3-b]pyridine core, as the β-amino carboxamide motif has been shown to engender poor solubility, varying degrees of P-gp efflux and represents a structural alert. A scaffold hopping exercise identified a novel 2,4-dimethylquinoline carboxamide core that provided M PAM activity and good CNS penetration without an amino moiety. In addition, MacMillan photoredox catalysis chemistry was essential for construction of the 2,4-dimethylquinoline core.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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Discovery of imidazo[1,2-a]-, [1,2,4]triazolo[4,3-a]-, and [1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-a]pyridine-8-carboxamide negative allosteric modulators of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5.
Felts AS, Rodriguez AL, Morrison RD, Bollinger KA, Venable DF, Blobaum AL, Byers FW, Thompson Gray A, Daniels JS, Niswender CM, Jones CK, Conn PJ, Lindsley CW, Emmitte KA
(2017) Bioorg Med Chem Lett 27: 4858-4866
MeSH Terms: Allosteric Regulation, Amides, Animals, Cell Membrane Permeability, Dogs, Dopamine Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins, Drug Evaluation, Preclinical, Half-Life, Humans, Inhibitory Concentration 50, Madin Darby Canine Kidney Cells, Mice, Microsomes, Liver, Pyridines, Rats, Receptor, Metabotropic Glutamate 5, Structure-Activity Relationship, Triazoles
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
Based on a hypothesis that an intramolecular hydrogen bond was present in our lead series of picolinamide mGlu NAMs, we reasoned that an inactive nicotinamide series could be modified through introduction of a fused heterocyclic core to generate potent mGlu NAMs. In this Letter, we describe the synthesis and evaluation of compounds that demonstrate the viability of that approach. Selected analogs were profiled in a variety of in vitro assays, and two compounds were evaluated in rat pharmacokinetic studies and a mouse model of obsessive-compulsive disorder. Ancillary pharmacology screening revealed that members of this series exhibited moderate inhibition of the dopamine transporter (DAT), and SAR was developed that expanded the selectivity for mGlu versus DAT.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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