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Functional Coupling of K-Cl Cotransporter (KCC) to GABA-Gated Cl Channels in the Central Nervous System of Drosophila melanogaster Leads to Altered Drug Sensitivities.
Chen R, Prael FJ, Li Z, Delpire E, Weaver CD, Swale DR
(2019) ACS Chem Neurosci 10: 2765-2776
MeSH Terms: Animals, Central Nervous System, Chloride Channels, Drosophila Proteins, Drosophila melanogaster, Insecticide Resistance, Neurons, Signal Transduction, Symporters, Synaptic Transmission, gamma-Aminobutyric Acid
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2019
GABAergic signaling is the cornerstone for fast synaptic inhibition of neural signaling in arthropods and mammals and is the molecular target for insecticides and pharmaceuticals, respectively. The K-Cl cotransporter (KCC) is the primary mechanism by which mature neurons maintain low intracellular Cl concentration, yet the fundamental physiology, comparative physiology, and toxicological relevance of insect KCC is understudied. Considering this, we employed electrophysiological, genetic, and pharmacological methods to characterize the physiological underpinnings of KCC function to the Drosophila CNS. Our data show that genetic ablation or pharmacological inhibition of KCC results in an increased spike discharge frequency and significantly ( P < 0.05) reduces the CNS sensitivity to γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Further, simultaneous inhibition of KCC and ligand-gated chloride channel (LGCC) complex results in a significant ( P < 0.001) increase in CNS spontaneous activity over baseline firing rates that supports functional coupling of KCC to LGCC function. Interestingly, 75% reduction in KCC mRNA did not alter basal neurotransmission levels indicating that only a fraction of the KCC population is required to maintain the Cl ionic gradient when at rest, but prolonged synaptic activity increases the threshold for GABA-mediated inhibition and reduces nerve sensitivity to GABA. These data expand current knowledge regarding the physiological role of KCC in a model insect and provides the necessary foundation to develop KCC as a novel biochemical target of insecticides, as well as complements existing research to provide a holistic understanding of the plasticity in mammalian health and disease.
0 Communities
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11 MeSH Terms
DSS-induced damage to basement membranes is repaired by matrix replacement and crosslinking.
Howard AM, LaFever KS, Fenix AM, Scurrah CR, Lau KS, Burnette DT, Bhave G, Ferrell N, Page-McCaw A
(2019) J Cell Sci 132:
MeSH Terms: Animals, Basement Membrane, Collagen Type IV, Dextran Sulfate, Drosophila melanogaster, Extracellular Matrix, Female, Laminin, Male
Show Abstract · Added March 27, 2019
Basement membranes are an ancient form of animal extracellular matrix. As important structural and functional components of tissues, basement membranes are subject to environmental damage and must be repaired while maintaining functions. Little is known about how basement membranes get repaired. This paucity stems from a lack of suitable models for analyzing such repair. Here, we show that dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) directly damages the gut basement membrane when fed to adult DSS becomes incorporated into the basement membrane, promoting its expansion while decreasing its stiffness, which causes morphological changes to the underlying muscles. Remarkably, two days after withdrawal of DSS, the basement membrane is repaired by all measures of analysis. We used this new damage model to determine that repair requires collagen crosslinking and replacement of damaged components. Genetic and biochemical evidence indicates that crosslinking is required to stabilize the newly incorporated repaired Collagen IV rather than to stabilize the damaged Collagen IV. These results suggest that basement membranes are surprisingly dynamic.
© 2019. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.
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2 Members
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9 MeSH Terms
Structural, functional, and behavioral insights of dopamine dysfunction revealed by a deletion in .
Campbell NG, Shekar A, Aguilar JI, Peng D, Navratna V, Yang D, Morley AN, Duran AM, Galli G, O'Grady B, Ramachandran R, Sutcliffe JS, Sitte HH, Erreger K, Meiler J, Stockner T, Bellan LM, Matthies HJG, Gouaux E, Mchaourab HS, Galli A
(2019) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 116: 3853-3862
MeSH Terms: Animals, Animals, Genetically Modified, Autism Spectrum Disorder, Crystallography, X-Ray, Dopamine, Dopamine Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins, Drosophila melanogaster, Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy, Fear, Humans, Interpersonal Relations, Locomotion, Models, Molecular, Mutation, Sequence Deletion
Show Abstract · Added March 18, 2020
The human dopamine (DA) transporter (hDAT) mediates clearance of DA. Genetic variants in hDAT have been associated with DA dysfunction, a complication associated with several brain disorders, including autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Here, we investigated the structural and behavioral bases of an ASD-associated in-frame deletion in hDAT at N336 (∆N336). We uncovered that the deletion promoted a previously unobserved conformation of the intracellular gate of the transporter, likely representing the rate-limiting step of the transport process. It is defined by a "half-open and inward-facing" state (HOIF) of the intracellular gate that is stabilized by a network of interactions conserved phylogenetically, as we demonstrated in hDAT by Rosetta molecular modeling and fine-grained simulations, as well as in its bacterial homolog leucine transporter by electron paramagnetic resonance analysis and X-ray crystallography. The stabilization of the HOIF state is associated both with DA dysfunctions demonstrated in isolated brains of expressing hDAT ∆N336 and with abnormal behaviors observed at high-time resolution. These flies display increased fear, impaired social interactions, and locomotion traits we associate with DA dysfunction and the HOIF state. Together, our results describe how a genetic variation causes DA dysfunction and abnormal behaviors by stabilizing a HOIF state of the transporter.
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MeSH Terms
Rif1 inhibits replication fork progression and controls DNA copy number in Drosophila.
Munden A, Rong Z, Sun A, Gangula R, Mallal S, Nordman JT
(2018) Elife 7:
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Animals, Carrier Proteins, DNA, DNA Replication, DNA-Binding Proteins, Drosophila Proteins, Drosophila melanogaster, Gene Dosage, Genome, Insect, Heat-Shock Response, Heterochromatin, Mutation, Protein Binding, Protein Domains, Reproducibility of Results, Salivary Glands
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
Control of DNA copy number is essential to maintain genome stability and ensure proper cell and tissue function. In polyploid cells, the SNF2-domain-containing SUUR protein inhibits replication fork progression within specific regions of the genome to promote DNA underreplication. While dissecting the function of SUUR's SNF2 domain, we identified an interaction between SUUR and Rif1. Rif1 has many roles in DNA metabolism and regulates the replication timing program. We demonstrate that repression of DNA replication is dependent on Rif1. Rif1 localizes to active replication forks in a partially SUUR-dependent manner and directly regulates replication fork progression. Importantly, SUUR associates with replication forks in the absence of Rif1, indicating that Rif1 acts downstream of SUUR to inhibit fork progression. Our findings uncover an unrecognized function of the Rif1 protein as a regulator of replication fork progression.
© 2018, Munden et al.
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1 Members
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MeSH Terms
APC Inhibits Ligand-Independent Wnt Signaling by the Clathrin Endocytic Pathway.
Saito-Diaz K, Benchabane H, Tiwari A, Tian A, Li B, Thompson JJ, Hyde AS, Sawyer LM, Jodoin JN, Santos E, Lee LA, Coffey RJ, Beauchamp RD, Williams CS, Kenworthy AK, Robbins DJ, Ahmed Y, Lee E
(2018) Dev Cell 44: 566-581.e8
MeSH Terms: Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Protein, Animals, Cells, Cultured, Clathrin, Drosophila melanogaster, Endocytosis, Female, Humans, Infant, Ligands, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Middle Aged, Wnt Proteins, Wnt Signaling Pathway, beta Catenin
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) mutations cause Wnt pathway activation in human cancers. Current models for APC action emphasize its role in promoting β-catenin degradation downstream of Wnt receptors. Unexpectedly, we find that blocking Wnt receptor activity in APC-deficient cells inhibits Wnt signaling independently of Wnt ligand. We also show that inducible loss of APC is rapidly followed by Wnt receptor activation and increased β-catenin levels. In contrast, APC2 loss does not promote receptor activation. We show that APC exists in a complex with clathrin and that Wnt pathway activation in APC-deficient cells requires clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Finally, we demonstrate conservation of this mechanism in Drosophila intestinal stem cells. We propose a model in which APC and APC2 function to promote β-catenin degradation, and APC also acts as a molecular "gatekeeper" to block receptor activation via the clathrin pathway.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
4 Members
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18 MeSH Terms
Wnt6 maintains anterior escort cells as an integral component of the germline stem cell niche.
Wang X, Page-McCaw A
(2018) Development 145:
MeSH Terms: Animals, Animals, Genetically Modified, Bone Morphogenetic Proteins, Cadherins, Cell Count, Cell Differentiation, Cell Lineage, Cell Survival, Drosophila Proteins, Drosophila melanogaster, Female, Germ Cells, Ligands, Models, Biological, Ovary, Signal Transduction, Stem Cell Niche, Wnt Proteins
Show Abstract · Added March 20, 2018
Stem cells reside in a niche, a local environment whose cellular and molecular complexity is still being elucidated. In ovaries, germline stem cells depend on cap cells for self-renewing signals and physical attachment. Germline stem cells also contact the anterior escort cells, and here we report that anterior escort cells are absolutely required for germline stem cell maintenance. When escort cells die from impaired Wnt signaling or expression, the loss of anterior escort cells causes loss of germline stem cells. Anterior escort cells function as an integral niche component by promoting DE-cadherin anchorage and by transiently expressing the Dpp ligand to promote full-strength BMP signaling in germline stem cells. Anterior escort cells are maintained by Wnt6 ligands produced by cap cells; without Wnt6 signaling, anterior escort cells die leaving vacancies in the niche, leading to loss of germline stem cells. Our data identify anterior escort cells as constituents of the germline stem cell niche, maintained by a cap cell-produced Wnt6 survival signal.
© 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.
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1 Members
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18 MeSH Terms
The Marburgvirus-Neutralizing Human Monoclonal Antibody MR191 Targets a Conserved Site to Block Virus Receptor Binding.
King LB, Fusco ML, Flyak AI, Ilinykh PA, Huang K, Gunn B, Kirchdoerfer RN, Hastie KM, Sangha AK, Meiler J, Alter G, Bukreyev A, Crowe JE, Saphire EO
(2018) Cell Host Microbe 23: 101-109.e4
MeSH Terms: Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Animals, Antibodies, Monoclonal, Antibodies, Neutralizing, Antibodies, Viral, Binding Sites, Carrier Proteins, Cell Line, Chlorocebus aethiops, Crystallography, X-Ray, Drosophila melanogaster, Humans, Marburgvirus, Membrane Glycoproteins, Receptors, Virus, Tobacco, Vero Cells, Viral Envelope Proteins, Viral Fusion Proteins, Virus Attachment
Show Abstract · Added March 17, 2018
Since their first identification 50 years ago, marburgviruses have emerged several times, with 83%-90% lethality in the largest outbreaks. Although no vaccines or therapeutics are available for human use, the human antibody MR191 provides complete protection in non-human primates when delivered several days after inoculation of a lethal marburgvirus dose. The detailed neutralization mechanism of MR191 remains outstanding. Here we present a 3.2 Å crystal structure of MR191 complexed with a trimeric marburgvirus surface glycoprotein (GP). MR191 neutralizes by occupying the conserved receptor-binding site and competing with the host receptor Niemann-Pick C1. The structure illuminates previously disordered regions of GP including the stalk, fusion loop, CXCC switch, and an N-terminal region of GP2 that wraps about the outside of GP1 to anchor a marburgvirus-specific "wing" antibody epitope. Virus escape mutations mapped far outside the MR191 receptor-binding site footprint suggest a role for these other regions in the GP quaternary structure.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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1 Members
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20 MeSH Terms
Neuronal activity drives FMRP- and HSPG-dependent matrix metalloproteinase function required for rapid synaptogenesis.
Dear ML, Shilts J, Broadie K
(2017) Sci Signal 10:
MeSH Terms: Animals, Disease Models, Animal, Drosophila Proteins, Drosophila melanogaster, Fragile X Syndrome, Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans, Matrix Metalloproteinase 1, Matrix Metalloproteinase 2, Neuromuscular Junction, Neurons, Presynaptic Terminals, Proteoglycans, Wnt Signaling Pathway
Show Abstract · Added December 7, 2017
Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) functions modulate synapse formation and activity-dependent plasticity. Aberrant MMP activity is implicated in fragile X syndrome (FXS), a disease caused by the loss of the RNA-binding protein FMRP and characterized by neurological dysfunction and intellectual disability. Gene expression studies in suggest that Mmps cooperate with the heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) glypican co-receptor Dally-like protein (Dlp) to restrict trans-synaptic Wnt signaling and that synaptogenic defects in the fly model of FXS are alleviated by either inhibition of Mmp or genetic reduction of Dlp. We used the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) glutamatergic synapse to test activity-dependent Dlp and Mmp intersections in the context of FXS. We found that rapid, activity-dependent synaptic bouton formation depended on secreted Mmp1. Acute neuronal stimulation reduced the abundance of Mmp2 but increased that of both Mmp1 and Dlp, as well as enhanced the colocalization of Dlp and Mmp1 at the synapse. Dlp function promoted Mmp1 abundance, localization, and proteolytic activity around synapses. Dlp glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains mediated this functional interaction with Mmp1. In the FXS fly model, activity-dependent increases in Mmp1 abundance and activity were lost but were restored by reducing the amount of synaptic Dlp. The data suggest that neuronal activity-induced, HSPG-dependent Mmp regulation drives activity-dependent synaptogenesis and that this is impaired in FXS. Thus, exploring this mechanism further may reveal therapeutic targets that have the potential to restore synaptogenesis in FXS patients.
Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.
1 Communities
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13 MeSH Terms
Lef1-dependent hypothalamic neurogenesis inhibits anxiety.
Xie Y, Kaufmann D, Moulton MJ, Panahi S, Gaynes JA, Watters HN, Zhou D, Xue HH, Fung CM, Levine EM, Letsou A, Brennan KC, Dorsky RI
(2017) PLoS Biol 15: e2002257
MeSH Terms: Animals, Anxiety, Behavior, Animal, Biomarkers, Drosophila Proteins, Drosophila melanogaster, Female, Gene Expression Regulation, Genes, Reporter, Humans, Hypothalamus, Lymphoid Enhancer-Binding Factor 1, Male, Mice, Knockout, Mice, Transgenic, Mutation, Nerve Tissue Proteins, Neurogenesis, Neurons, Species Specificity, Transcription Factors, Zebrafish, Zebrafish Proteins
Show Abstract · Added February 14, 2018
While innate behaviors are conserved throughout the animal kingdom, it is unknown whether common signaling pathways regulate the development of neuronal populations mediating these behaviors in diverse organisms. Here, we demonstrate that the Wnt/ß-catenin effector Lef1 is required for the differentiation of anxiolytic hypothalamic neurons in zebrafish and mice, although the identity of Lef1-dependent genes and neurons differ between these 2 species. We further show that zebrafish and Drosophila have common Lef1-dependent gene expression in their respective neuroendocrine organs, consistent with a conserved pathway that has diverged in the mouse. Finally, orthologs of Lef1-dependent genes from both zebrafish and mouse show highly correlated hypothalamic expression in marmosets and humans, suggesting co-regulation of 2 parallel anxiolytic pathways in primates. These findings demonstrate that during evolution, a transcription factor can act through multiple mechanisms to generate a common behavioral output, and that Lef1 regulates circuit development that is fundamentally important for mediating anxiety in a wide variety of animal species.
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1 Members
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23 MeSH Terms
Short DNA sequence patterns accurately identify broadly active human enhancers.
Colbran LL, Chen L, Capra JA
(2017) BMC Genomics 18: 536
MeSH Terms: Animals, DNA, Drosophila melanogaster, Enhancer Elements, Genetic, GC Rich Sequence, Humans, Nucleotide Motifs, Sequence Analysis, DNA, Transcription Factors
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
BACKGROUND - Enhancers are DNA regulatory elements that influence gene expression. There is substantial diversity in enhancers' activity patterns: some enhancers drive expression in a single cellular context, while others are active across many. Sequence characteristics, such as transcription factor (TF) binding motifs, influence the activity patterns of regulatory sequences; however, the regulatory logic through which specific sequences drive enhancer activity patterns is poorly understood. Recent analysis of Drosophila enhancers suggested that short dinucleotide repeat motifs (DRMs) are general enhancer sequence features that drive broad regulatory activity. However, it is not known whether the regulatory role of DRMs is conserved across species.
RESULTS - We performed a comprehensive analysis of the relationship between short DNA sequence patterns, including DRMs, and human enhancer activity in 38,538 enhancers across 411 different contexts. In a machine-learning framework, the occurrence patterns of short sequence motifs accurately predicted broadly active human enhancers. However, DRMs alone were weakly predictive of broad enhancer activity in humans and showed different enrichment patterns than in Drosophila. In general, GC-rich sequence motifs were significantly associated with broad enhancer activity, and consistent with this enrichment, broadly active human TFs recognize GC-rich motifs.
CONCLUSIONS - Our results reveal the importance of specific sequence motifs in broadly active human enhancers, demonstrate the lack of evolutionary conservation of the role of DRMs, and provide a computational framework for investigating the logic of enhancer sequences.
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9 MeSH Terms