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Quantum dots reveal heterogeneous membrane diffusivity and dynamic surface density polarization of dopamine transporter.
Kovtun O, Tomlinson ID, Ferguson RS, Rosenthal SJ
(2019) PLoS One 14: e0225339
MeSH Terms: Algorithms, Animals, Cell Membrane, Dopamine Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Models, Theoretical, Quantum Dots, Reproducibility of Results, Structure-Activity Relationship
Show Abstract · Added March 30, 2020
The presynaptic dopamine transporter mediates rapid reuptake of synaptic dopamine. Although cell surface DAT trafficking recently emerged as an important component of DAT regulation, it has not been systematically investigated. Here, we apply our single quantum dot (Qdot) tracking approach to monitor DAT plasma membrane dynamics in several heterologous expression cell hosts with nanometer localization accuracy. We demonstrate that Qdot-tagged DAT proteins exhibited highly heterogeneous membrane diffusivity dependent on the local membrane topography. We also show that Qdot-tagged DATs were localized away from the flat membrane regions and were dynamically retained in the membrane protrusions and cell edges for the duration of imaging. Single quantum dot tracking of wildtype DAT and its conformation-defective coding variants (R60A and W63A) revealed a significantly accelerated rate of dysfunctional DAT membrane diffusion. We believe our results warrant an in-depth investigation as to whether compromised membrane dynamics is a common feature of brain disorder-derived DAT mutants.
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Differential regional decline in dopamine receptor availability across adulthood: Linear and nonlinear effects of age.
Seaman KL, Smith CT, Juarez EJ, Dang LC, Castrellon JJ, Burgess LL, San Juan MD, Kundzicz PM, Cowan RL, Zald DH, Samanez-Larkin GR
(2019) Hum Brain Mapp 40: 3125-3138
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Aging, Brain, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Models, Statistical, Positron-Emission Tomography, Receptors, Dopamine D2, Receptors, Dopamine D3, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added April 15, 2019
Theories of adult brain development, based on neuropsychological test results and structural neuroimaging, suggest differential rates of age-related change in function across cortical and subcortical sub-regions. However, it remains unclear if these trends also extend to the aging dopamine system. Here we examined cross-sectional adult age differences in estimates of D2-like receptor binding potential across several cortical and subcortical brain regions using PET imaging and the radiotracer [ F]Fallypride in two samples of healthy human adults (combined N = 132). After accounting for regional differences in overall radioligand binding, estimated percent difference in receptor binding potential by decade (linear effects) were highest in most temporal and frontal cortical regions (~6-16% per decade), moderate in parahippocampal gyrus, pregenual frontal cortex, fusiform gyrus, caudate, putamen, thalamus, and amygdala (~3-5%), and weakest in subcallosal frontal cortex, ventral striatum, pallidum, and hippocampus (~0-2%). Some regions showed linear effects of age while many showed curvilinear effects such that binding potential declined from young adulthood to middle age and then was relatively stable until old age. Overall, these data indicate that the rate and pattern of decline in D2 receptor availability is regionally heterogeneous. However, the differences across regions were challenging to organize within existing theories of brain development and did not show the same pattern of regional change that has been observed in gray matter volume, white matter integrity, or cognitive performance. This variation suggests that existing theories of adult brain development may need to be modified to better account for the spatial dynamics of dopaminergic system aging.
© 2019 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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16 MeSH Terms
Critical role of the finger loop in arrestin binding to the receptors.
Zheng C, Tholen J, Gurevich VV
(2019) PLoS One 14: e0213792
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Arrestins, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Point Mutation, Protein Conformation, Receptor, Muscarinic M2, Receptors, Adrenergic, beta-2, Receptors, Dopamine D1, Receptors, Dopamine D2, Sequence Homology
Show Abstract · Added March 18, 2020
We tested the interactions with four different G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) of arrestin-3 mutants with substitutions in the four loops, three of which contact the receptor in the structure of the arrestin-1-rhodopsin complex. Point mutations in the loop at the distal tip of the N-domain (Glu157Ala), in the C-loop (Phe255Ala), back loop (Lys313Ala), and one of the mutations in the finger loop (Gly65Pro) had mild variable effects on receptor binding. In contrast, the deletion of Gly65 at the beginning of the finger loop reduced the binding to all GPCRs tested, with the binding to dopamine D2 receptor being affected most dramatically. Thus, the presence of a glycine at the beginning of the finger loop appears to be critical for the arrestin-receptor interaction.
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Biotinylated-spiperone ligands for quantum dot labeling of the dopamine D2 receptor in live cell cultures.
Tomlinson ID, Kovtun O, Crescentini TM, Rosenthal SJ
(2019) Bioorg Med Chem Lett 29: 959-964
MeSH Terms: Biotin, Dopamine D2 Receptor Antagonists, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Ligands, Microscopy, Fluorescence, Quantum Dots, Receptors, Dopamine D2, Spiperone, Streptavidin
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
We have synthesized 3 analogs of the dopamine D2 receptor (D2 DR) antagonist spiperone that can be conjugated to streptavidin-coated quantum dots via a pegylated biotin derivative. Using fluorescent imaging we demonstrate that substitution on the spiro position is tolerated, whilst the length and rigidity of a spacer arm attached to spiperone is important in controlling specific labeling as well as minimizing nonspecific labeling to cells and the surface of cell culture dishes. The ligand with the most rigid linker IDT772 (4) had the best binding profile and had high specific binding to D2 DR expressing HEK-293T cells with low nonspecific binding to plates and HEK-293T cells that lacked the D2 DR.
Copyright © 2019. Published by Elsevier Ltd.
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10 MeSH Terms
Dopamine effects on frontal cortical blood flow and motor inhibition in Parkinson's disease.
Trujillo P, van Wouwe NC, Lin YC, Stark AJ, Petersen KJ, Kang H, Zald DH, Donahue MJ, Claassen DO
(2019) Cortex 115: 99-111
MeSH Terms: Aged, Cerebrovascular Circulation, Dopamine Agonists, Female, Frontal Lobe, Humans, Inhibition, Psychological, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Neuropsychological Tests, Parkinson Disease, Psychomotor Performance, Reaction Time
Show Abstract · Added April 15, 2019
Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by dysfunction in frontal cortical and striatal networks that regulate action control. We investigated the pharmacological effect of dopamine agonist replacement therapy on frontal cortical activity and motor inhibition. Using Arterial Spin Labeling MRI, we examined 26 PD patients in the off- and on-dopamine agonist medication states to assess the effect of dopamine agonists on frontal cortical regional cerebral blood flow. Motor inhibition was measured by the Simon task in both medication states. We applied the dual process activation suppression model to dissociate fast response impulses from motor inhibition of incorrect responses. General linear regression model analyses determined the medication effect on regional cerebral blood flow and motor inhibition, and the relationship between regional cerebral blood flow and motor inhibitory proficiency. We show that dopamine agonist administration increases frontal cerebral blood flow, particularly in the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA) and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Higher regional blood flow in the pre-SMA, DLPFC and motor cortex was associated with better inhibitory control, suggesting that treatments which improve frontal cortical activity could ameliorate motor inhibition deficiency in PD patients.
Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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14 MeSH Terms
Structural, functional, and behavioral insights of dopamine dysfunction revealed by a deletion in .
Campbell NG, Shekar A, Aguilar JI, Peng D, Navratna V, Yang D, Morley AN, Duran AM, Galli G, O'Grady B, Ramachandran R, Sutcliffe JS, Sitte HH, Erreger K, Meiler J, Stockner T, Bellan LM, Matthies HJG, Gouaux E, Mchaourab HS, Galli A
(2019) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 116: 3853-3862
MeSH Terms: Animals, Animals, Genetically Modified, Autism Spectrum Disorder, Crystallography, X-Ray, Dopamine, Dopamine Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins, Drosophila melanogaster, Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy, Fear, Humans, Interpersonal Relations, Locomotion, Models, Molecular, Mutation, Sequence Deletion
Show Abstract · Added March 18, 2020
The human dopamine (DA) transporter (hDAT) mediates clearance of DA. Genetic variants in hDAT have been associated with DA dysfunction, a complication associated with several brain disorders, including autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Here, we investigated the structural and behavioral bases of an ASD-associated in-frame deletion in hDAT at N336 (∆N336). We uncovered that the deletion promoted a previously unobserved conformation of the intracellular gate of the transporter, likely representing the rate-limiting step of the transport process. It is defined by a "half-open and inward-facing" state (HOIF) of the intracellular gate that is stabilized by a network of interactions conserved phylogenetically, as we demonstrated in hDAT by Rosetta molecular modeling and fine-grained simulations, as well as in its bacterial homolog leucine transporter by electron paramagnetic resonance analysis and X-ray crystallography. The stabilization of the HOIF state is associated both with DA dysfunctions demonstrated in isolated brains of expressing hDAT ∆N336 and with abnormal behaviors observed at high-time resolution. These flies display increased fear, impaired social interactions, and locomotion traits we associate with DA dysfunction and the HOIF state. Together, our results describe how a genetic variation causes DA dysfunction and abnormal behaviors by stabilizing a HOIF state of the transporter.
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Serotonin transporter inhibition and 5-HT receptor activation drive loss of cocaine-induced locomotor activation in DAT Val559 mice.
Stewart A, Davis GL, Gresch PJ, Katamish RM, Peart R, Rabil MJ, Gowrishankar R, Carroll FI, Hahn MK, Blakely RD
(2019) Neuropsychopharmacology 44: 994-1006
MeSH Terms: Animals, Behavior, Animal, Cocaine, Conditioning, Classical, Disease Models, Animal, Dopamine, Dopamine Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins, Dopamine Uptake Inhibitors, Fluoxetine, Locomotion, Methylphenidate, Mice, Mice, 129 Strain, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Transgenic, Neostriatum, Receptor, Serotonin, 5-HT2C, Serotonin Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins, Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors
Show Abstract · Added January 8, 2019
Dopamine (DA) signaling dysfunction is believed to contribute to multiple neuropsychiatric disorders including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The rare DA transporter (DAT) coding substitution Ala559Val found in subjects with ADHD, bipolar disorder and autism, promotes anomalous DA efflux in vitro and, in DAT Val559 mice, leads to increased reactivity to imminent handling, waiting impulsivity, and enhanced motivation for reward. Here, we report that, in contrast to amphetamine and methylphenidate, which induce significant locomotor activation, cocaine administration to these mice elicits no locomotor effects, despite retention of conditioned place preference (CPP). Additionally, cocaine fails to elevate extracellular DA. Given that amphetamine and methylphenidate, unlike cocaine, lack high-affinity interactions with the serotonin (5-HT) transporter (SERT), we hypothesized that the lack of cocaine-induced hyperlocomotion in DAT Val559 mice arises from SERT blockade and augmented 5-HT signaling relative to cocaine actions on wildtype animals. Consistent with this idea, the SERT blocker fluoxetine abolished methylphenidate-induced locomotor activity in DAT Val559 mice, mimicking the effects seen with cocaine. Additionally, a cocaine analog (RTI-113) with greater selectivity for DAT over SERT retains locomotor activation in DAT Val559 mice. Furthermore, genetic elimination of high-affinity cocaine interactions at SERT in DAT Val559 mice, or specific inhibition of 5-HT receptors in these animals, restored cocaine-induced locomotion, but did not restore cocaine-induced elevations of extracellular DA. Our findings reveal a significant serotonergic plasticity arising in the DAT Val559 model that involves enhanced 5-HT signaling, acting independently of striatal DA release, capable of suppressing the activity of cocaine-sensitive motor circuits.
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19 MeSH Terms
Ventral striatal dopamine transporter availability is associated with lower trait motor impulsivity in healthy adults.
Smith CT, San Juan MD, Dang LC, Katz DT, Perkins SF, Burgess LL, Cowan RL, Manning HC, Nickels ML, Claassen DO, Samanez-Larkin GR, Zald DH
(2018) Transl Psychiatry 8: 269
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Dopamine Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins, Exploratory Behavior, Female, Fluorodeoxyglucose F18, Humans, Impulsive Behavior, Male, Middle Aged, Personality, Personality Inventory, Positron-Emission Tomography, Ventral Striatum, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added April 15, 2019
Impulsivity is a transdiagnostic feature of a range of externalizing psychiatric disorders. Preclinical work links reduced ventral striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) availability with heightened impulsivity and novelty seeking. However, there is a lack of human data investigating the relationship between DAT availability, particularly in subregions of the striatum, and the personality traits of impulsivity and novelty seeking. Here we collected PET measures of DAT availability (BP) using the tracer F-FE-PE2I in 47 healthy adult subjects and examined relations between BP in striatum, including its subregions: caudate, putamen, and ventral striatum (VS), and trait impulsivity (Barratt Impulsiveness Scale: BIS-11) and novelty seeking (Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire: TPQ-NS), controlling for age and sex. DAT BP in each striatal subregion showed nominal negative associations with total BIS-11 but not TPQ-NS. At the subscale level, VS DAT BP was significantly associated with BIS-11 motor impulsivity (e.g., taking actions without thinking) after correction for multiple comparisons. VS DAT BP explained 13.2% of the variance in motor impulsivity. Our data demonstrate that DAT availability in VS is negatively related to impulsivity and suggest a particular influence of DAT regulation of dopamine signaling in VS on acting without deliberation (BIS motor impulsivity). While needing replication, these data converge with models of ventral striatal functions that emphasize its role as a key interface linking motivation to action.
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15 MeSH Terms
Individual Differences in Dopamine Are Associated with Reward Discounting in Clinical Groups But Not in Healthy Adults.
Castrellon JJ, Seaman KL, Crawford JL, Young JS, Smith CT, Dang LC, Hsu M, Cowan RL, Zald DH, Samanez-Larkin GR
(2019) J Neurosci 39: 321-332
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Aging, Behavior, Addictive, Brain, Brain Mapping, Delay Discounting, Dopamine, Female, Humans, Individuality, Male, Mental Disorders, Middle Aged, Positron-Emission Tomography, Receptors, Dopamine D2, Reward, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added April 15, 2019
Some people are more willing to make immediate, risky, or costly reward-focused choices than others, which has been hypothesized to be associated with individual differences in dopamine (DA) function. In two studies using PET imaging, one empirical (Study 1: = 144 males and females across 3 samples) and one meta-analytic (Study 2: = 307 across 12 samples), we sought to characterize associations between individual differences in DA and time, probability, and physical effort discounting in human adults. Study 1 demonstrated that individual differences in DA D2-like receptors were not associated with time or probability discounting of monetary rewards in healthy humans, and associations with physical effort discounting were inconsistent across adults of different ages. Meta-analytic results for temporal discounting corroborated our empirical finding for minimal effect of DA measures on discounting in healthy individuals but suggested that associations between individual differences in DA and reward discounting depend on clinical features. Addictions were characterized by negative correlations between DA and discounting, but other clinical conditions, such as Parkinson's disease, obesity, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, were characterized by positive correlations between DA and discounting. Together, the results suggest that trait differences in discounting in healthy adults do not appear to be strongly associated with individual differences in D2-like receptors. The difference in meta-analytic correlation effects between healthy controls and individuals with psychopathology suggests that individual difference findings related to DA and reward discounting in clinical samples may not be reliably generalized to healthy controls, and vice versa. Decisions to forgo large rewards for smaller ones due to increasing time delays, uncertainty, or physical effort have been linked to differences in dopamine (DA) function, which is disrupted in some forms of psychopathology. It remains unclear whether alterations in DA function associated with psychopathology also extend to explaining associations between DA function and decision making in healthy individuals. We show that individual differences in DA D2 receptor availability are not consistently related to monetary discounting of time, probability, or physical effort in healthy individuals across a broad age range. By contrast, we suggest that psychopathology accounts for observed inconsistencies in the relationship between measures of DA function and reward discounting behavior.
Copyright © 2019 Castrellon et al.
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20 MeSH Terms
Lack of consistent sex differences in D-amphetamine-induced dopamine release measured with [F]fallypride PET.
Smith CT, Dang LC, Burgess LL, Perkins SF, San Juan MD, Smith DK, Cowan RL, Le NT, Kessler RM, Samanez-Larkin GR, Zald DH
(2019) Psychopharmacology (Berl) 236: 581-590
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Benzamides, Central Nervous System Stimulants, Dextroamphetamine, Dopamine, Female, Fluorine Radioisotopes, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Positron-Emission Tomography, Receptors, Dopamine D2, Receptors, Dopamine D3, Sex Characteristics, Sex Factors, Ventral Striatum, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added April 15, 2019
RATIONALE - Sex differences in the dopaminergic response to psychostimulants could have implications for drug abuse risk and other psychopathology involving the dopamine system, but human data are limited and mixed.
OBJECTIVES - Here, we sought to investigate sex differences in dopamine release after oral D-amphetamine administration.
METHODS - We used [F]fallypride positron emission tomography (PET) to measure the change in dopamine D2/3 receptor availability (%ΔBP, an index of dopamine release) between placebo and D-amphetamine sessions in two independent datasets containing a total of 39 females (on either hormonal birth control n = 18, postmenopausal n = 10, or studied in the first 10 days of their menstrual cycle n = 11) and 37 males.
RESULTS - Using both a priori anatomical regions of interest based on previous findings and voxelwise analyses, we failed to consistently detect broad sex differences in D-amphetamine-induced dopamine release. Nevertheless, there was limited evidence for greater right ventral striatal dopamine release in young adult males relative to similarly aged females, but this was not consistently observed across samples. Plasma estradiol did not correlate with dopamine release and this measure did not differ in females on and off hormonal birth control.
CONCLUSIONS - While our finding in young adults from one dataset of greater %ΔBP in males is partially consistent with a previously published study on sex differences in D-amphetamine-induced dopamine release, our data do not support the presence of consistent widespread sex differences in this measure of dopamine release.
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18 MeSH Terms